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Manchester Police Patrolman’s Association Endorse Maggie Hassan

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DSC_0236Manchester Police Patrolman’s Association Endorses Governor Maggie Hassan for Her Record of Supporting Public Safety in the Queen City

Fourth Public Safety Organization to Endorse Governor Hassan for Re-Election

Manchester—Praising her strong leadership and record of fighting for the priorities that help keep New Hampshire’s largest city safe, the Manchester Police Patrolman’s Association endorsed Maggie Hassan for re-election.

“Governor Hassan’s strong leadership and proven record of protecting our communities make her the clear choice on public safety in this election,” said MPPA President Ken Chamberlain. “We are proud to endorse Governor Hassan for re-election and know that she will always work to bring DSC_0229together members of both parties to get things done to strengthen public safety and ensure that our law enforcement officials have the support we need to protect the people of Manchester.”

“It’s a tremendous honor to have earned the support of the Manchester Police Patrolman’s Association again this year as we work to keep Manchester safe and solve problems the New Hampshire Way,” said Governor Hassan. “Maintaining the safety of our communities and citizens is the most important job of state government, and through our bipartisan budget, we’ve made critical investments in protecting our communities, without a sales or income tax. We maintained drug task force teams, funded the cold case unit, restored the CHINS program, and through our bipartisan health care expansion plan, thousands of people will have access to substance and alcohol treatment coverage for the first time.”

“But my opponent is pushing a so-called ‘plan’ that’s straight out of the Bill O’Brien playbook and would blow a $90 million hole in our state budget, placing critical investments in public safety at risk. We have come too far to let my opponent take us backward, and together we’ll continue to keep New Hampshire safe and move our state in the right direction,” added Governor Hassan.

Through her bipartisan budget, Governor Hassan fought to protect critical investments in public safety – without a sales or income tax. The Governor restored the CHINS program, invested in drug task force teams, funded the cold case unit, and launched Media Power Youth, a public-private initiative to increase media literacy and reduce and prevent youth violence.

The Governor also worked across party lines to strengthen community-based mental health services and pass a bipartisan Medicaid expansion plan that is providing coverage for mental health and substance use treatment to thousands of hard-working Granite Staters, strengthening the safety and well being of our communities.

The MPPA is the fourth public safety organization to endorse Governor Hassan for re-election, joining the New Hampshire Troopers’ Association, Professional Fire Fighters of New Hampshire, and the New Hampshire Police Association.

Today in labor history for the week of October 20, 2014

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October 20
Eugene V. Debs, U.S. labor leader and socialist, dies in Elmhurst, Ill. Among his radical ideas: an 8-hour workday, pensions, workman’s compensation, sick leave and social security. He ran for president from a jail cell in 1920 and got a million votes – 1926
(The Bending Cross: A Biography of Eugene V. Debs: Eugene V. Debs was a labor activist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who captured the heart and soul of the nation’s working people. He was brilliant, sincere, compassionate and scrupulously honest. A founder of one of the nation’s first industrial unions, the American Railway Union, he went on to help launch the Industrial Workers of the World—the Wobblies. A man of firm beliefs and dedication, he ran for President of the United States five times under the banner of the Socialist Party, in 1912 earning 6 percent of the popular vote.)

Hollywood came under scrutiny as the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) opened hearings into alleged Communist influence within the motion picture industry. Dozens of union members were among those blacklisted following as a result of HUAC’s activities – 1947

Presidential candidate Ronald Reagan writes to PATCO President Robert Poli with this promise: if the union endorses Reagan, “I will take whatever steps are necessary to provide our air traffic controllers with the most modern equipment available and to adjust staff levels and work days so that they are commensurate with achieving a maximum degree of public safety.” He got the endorsement. Nine months after the election, he fires the air traffic controllers for engaging in an illegal walkout over staffing levels and working conditions – 1980

2014.10.20history-merle.travisDeath of Merle Travis, songwriter and performer who wrote “Sixteen Tons” and “Dark as a Dungeon” – 1983

Two track workers are killed in a (San Francisco) Bay Area Rapid Transit train accident. Federal investigators said the train was run by a BART employee who was being trained as an operator as members of the Amalgamated Transit Union were participating in what was to be a four-day strike – 2013

October 21
Wisconsin dairy farmers begin their third strike of the year in an attempt to raise the price of milk paid to producers during the Great Depression. Several creameries were bombed before the strike ended a month later. The economy eventually improved, allowing the farmers to make more money – 1933

October 22
Bank robber Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd is killed by FBI agents near East Liverpool, Ohio. He was a hero to the people of Oklahoma who saw him as a “Sagebrush Robin Hood,” stealing from banks and sharing some of the proceeds with the poor – 1934

October 23
President Theodore Roosevelt establishes a fact-finding commission that suspends a nine-months-long strike by Western Pennsylvania coal miners fighting for better pay, shorter workdays and union recognition. The strikers ended up winning more pay for fewer hours, but failed to get union recognition. It was the first time that the federal government had intervened as a neutral arbitrator in a labor dispute – 1902

Explosion and fire at Phillips Petroleum refinery in Pasadena, Texas, kills 23 and injures 314 – 19892014.10.20history-phillips.petroleum

Postal workers Joseph Curseen and Thomas Morris die nearly a month after having inhaled anthrax at the Brentwood mail sorting center in Washington, D.C. Other postal workers had been made ill but survived. Letters containing the deadly spores had been addressed to U.S. Senate offices and media outlets – 2001

October 24
The 40-hour work week goes into effect under the Fair Labor Standards Act, signed by President Roosevelt two years earlier – 1940

U.S. minimum wage increases to 40¢ an hour – 1945

October 25
What many believe to be the first formal training on first aid in American history took place at the Windsor Hotel in Jermyn, Penn., when Dr. Matthew J. Shields instructed 25 coal miners on ways to help their fellow miners. Upon completion of the course each of the miners was prepared and able to render first aid. The training led to marked decreases in serious mining injuries and fatalities – 1899
2014.10.20history-educate(Back in 1899 workers were trained to help other workers. Education for Changing Unions is for those looking for new and better ways to educate workers and communities about unions and the principles for which they stand. It is filled with spirited new ideas, practical exercises and issues under debate. It’s written in a clear and accessible style that’s designed to stimulate working people and teachers in many settings and locations.)

Some 25,000 silk dye workers strike in Paterson, N.J. – 1934

In what becomes known as the Great Hawaiian Dock Strike, a 6-month struggle to win wage parity with mainland dock workers, ends in victory – 1949

The Tribune Co. begins a brutal 5-month-long lockout at the New York Daily News, part of an effort to bust the newspaper’s unions – 1990

John Sweeney, president of the Service Employees Int’l Union, elected president of AFL-CIO – 19952014.10.20history-bitter.pill.bookcover
(A Bitter Pill: A Lenny Moss Mystery: As president of SEIU, Sweeney represented hospital workers. In this entertaining mystery, hospital worker and union steward Lenny Moss and his friends at James Madison Hospital are in the fight of their lives. The new hospital president, Robert “Third Reich” Reichart, has turned the hospital into a for-profit facility and launched a campaign to decertify the union. If successful, the decertification drive will destroy the union and compromise patient care as staffing levels are slashed and departments get outsourced to private firms.)

After a two-year fight, workers at the Bonus Car Wash in Santa Monica, Calif., win a union contract calling for pay increases, better breaks and other gains. “They didn’t treat us like people,” nine-year employee Oliverio Gomez told the Los Angeles Times – 2011

October 26
After eight years and at least 1,000 worker deaths—mostly Irish immigrants—the 350-mile Erie Canal opens, linking the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean. Father John Raho wrote to his bishop Source Link

Shaheen Campaigns with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, NH AFL-CIO President in Hooksett

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Manchester – This evening Senator Jeanne Shaheen campaigned with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, New Hampshire AFL-CIO President Mark MacKenzie, and more than a hundred supporters from the labor community at an event in Hooksett, where the three discussed how Shaheen’s record standing up for New Hampshire working families contrasts with Scott Brown’s record of supporting out-of state corporate interests and companies that outsource jobs.

“When it comes to jobs and the economy, Scott Brown and I have two very different records,” said Shaheen. “I believe we need to increase the minimum wage because it’s what’s right for New Hampshire families, but Scott Brown opposes the increase. I know we need to once and for all end giveaways for Big Oil, Wall Street and companies that ship jobs overseas, but time and again Scott Brown voted to protect those special breaks. And I want to make sure we’re doing everything we can to support New Hampshire small businesses across our state, but Scott Brown voted against them when he was representing Massachusetts. The difference is clear: I have never stopped fighting to make a difference for the families and businesses that make up the backbone of our state’s economy, and I never will.”

“Jeanne Shaheen has a long record working to create good paying jobs and has always fought to ensure hardworking people get the fair shot they deserve,” said Boston Mayor Marty Walsh. “When he was Massachusetts’ senator, Scott Brown voted against unemployment benefits. He voted to water down Wall Street reform. And he helped big corporations ship American jobs overseas. When you see his record up close like we did, you see he’s not someone who has spent his career standing up for working people. Jeanne Shaheen has.”

“Outsourcing is the type of business practice that lines the pockets of millionaires like Scott Brown but is devastating for communities here in New Hampshire,” said Mark Mackenzie, President of the New Hampshire AFL-CIO. “When jobs are shipped overseas, families suffer, unemployment increases, and communities are decimated. The fact that Scott Brown personally profited from this practice is wrong, and we need to reelect our Senator, Jeanne Shaheen, who we know will always stand up for working families here in New Hampshire.”

Jeanne Shaheen has spent her career fighting for good paying jobs here in New Hampshire. Shaheen led the fight to pass the bipartisan Small Business Jobs Act, which has helped countless New Hampshire businesses expand and create new jobs. Shaheen also cosponsored the bipartisan Travel Promotion Act, which invested in New Hampshire’s tourism industry, the second largest in the state, supporting nearly 70,000 jobs. Shaheen is currently fighting to increase the minimum wage because she believes no one in New Hampshire should have to work full time and still live in poverty.

Meanwhile, Scott Brown opposes increasing the minimum wage and voted to support tax loopholes for Big Oil, Wall Street and companies that offshore American jobs.  Since losing in Massachusetts, Brown has made over a quarter million dollars as a board member of a company that touts outsourcing American jobs to China and Mexico as part of its business plan. Legal documents dated just two days before Brown entered the U.S. Senate race in New Hampshire bear his signature endorsing the company’s outsourcing strategy.

Students Protest Canceling SRC Teachers Contracts, SRC Chairwomen Simms Tells Students “You Belong In Jail”

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This is a special cross post from Sean Kitchen of the Raging Chicken Press who have been covering the anti-union activities surrounding in the Philadelphia school district.

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Mother of Student Protester, “I am appalled and ashamed at the behavior of Sylvia Simms”

By Sean Kitchen

Yesterday evening, SCR Chairwoman Sylvia Simms hosted a screening of the controversial movie Won’t Back Down, an anti-union file that promotes the right-wing stereotypes of public school teachers.  At the screening, students from the Philadelphia Student Union staged a protest chanting “We wont back down, Philly is a union town.”  This is the same organization that planned last week’s student strikes at Science Leadership Academy and the Creative and Performing Arts in South Philadelphia.  At the meeting, Simms is reported yelling “You must go to a failing school…you belong in jail,” to the student protesters, but some of these students attend Philadelphia School District’s magnet school, Science Leadership Academy.  The Raging Chicken Press was able to reach out to Suzanne Anderson the mother of a SLA student striker who participated in last night’s protest.

When asked about her feelings on the School Reform Commission’s decision to cancel the teachers’ contract, she wrote:

I think canceling the teacher’s contract (essentially eviscerating the union) was illegal, immoral and clearly an effort to intentionally undercut and sabotage public education. I know it’s been done over and over again over the last 25 years, but it boggles my mind that an employer takes the position that the workers bear the responsibility to personally finance a bail out of their “company” to save their jobs. It’s profoundly manipulative because teachers aren’t just employees. They are fully invested in the mission of their work and have, sadly, internalized the propaganda of  self-sacrifice to mitigate damaging the students they are dedicated to serve. It’s perverse and unsustainable.

There has been a clear dismantling of Public Works in my lifetime. parks, utilities, transportation, education. All are things that formed the bedrock of the US middle class.  Public education seems to now be expendable. A privilege saved for those who can afford it. Teachers are villainized as lazy, incompetent and greedy. The press keeps minimizing this contract breach as “greedy teachers who don’t want to pay their fair share toward their healthcare benefits.” “It’s only $70 a paycheck.” But it’s much more than that for families that now see less coverage and a $6000 a year pay-cut with exponentially more work to do, crippling micro-management by legislators and the self-serving toxic standardized testing machine. The teacher have absolutely no recourse, under specter of losing their  livelihood with the threat of losing their teaching credentials if they strike.

Then when asked about Sylvia Simms losing her cool on public school students, she went on to say:

schoolsI am appalled and ashamed at the behavior of Sylvia Simms, and some of the other adults, at this gathering. They shamefully menaced the same school children they are sworn to protect and serve,  insulted and shamed them because they dared to challenge the authority of the SRC. They specifically denigrated and belittled my kid, who is incredibly successful, by anyone’s measure.

Both my daughters attend Science Leadership Academy, where independent, critical thinking is taught, valued and lived.  It seems like the people in charge this evening wanted the kids to walk in lock-step and went completely berserk when the kids thought for themselves, stood up for themselves. There’s a scene in that stupid movie they screened tonight where the evil UNION “tenurized” teacher engaged in very similar behavior to that of Sylvia Simms and her ilk towards my daughter and her colleagues, betraying their true character and beliefs. A teacher would lose their job for treating a student like that.  I only hope the videos taken this evening are located and released, so the truth doesn’t get twisted and distorted by the SRC and their henchmen.

Originally posted at Raging Chicken Press.

The NH Union Leader Attacks Manchester Teachers, NEA-NH Responds

Teacher in classroom (image by audiolucistore Flickr)

250_mea45-150x150“LET US hear no more about underpaid Manchester teachers laboring without a contract.” So goes the opening statement of a recent Union Leader editorial. It goes on to admonish teachers for not willingly taking a pay cut while continuing to work as hard or harder than many would think possible. But as is often the case, whether it be in an editorial or an article, the paper skews facts in an effort to paint Manchester teachers as greedy and ungrateful when this isn’t the case.

The fact of the matter is that roughly one half of all Manchester teachers rely strictly on a cost of living adjustment (COLA) to increase their salary. Those on the schedule receive an agreed-to increase for the previous year’s service, plus the same COLA. Detractors say that this is a guaranteed raise for 14 years. It isn’t. It’s the mutual agreement made between the district and its teachers that allows for the district to slowly pay teachers what their years of schooling, training and credentialing warrant.

For those no longer receiving these steps, the proposed COLA does not meet the rate of inflation. The proposed COLA for this contract was 1 percent, while the threeyear average of the rate of inflation, on which our dastardly tax cap is based, equates to roughly 2.14 percent.

So right out of the gate teachers who have given their careers to the children and future of the city are increasing at less than half the average rate of inflation. This doesn’t even factor in the increase of insurance premiums, copays, prescriptions or deductibles.

The Union Leader likes to lump all of the numbers together. You see, it looks better for their contention that we’re sucking the city dry. We aren’t. The reality of the situation is that some plans call for a 7 percent premium, while another calls for a 14.5 percent premium. The end result of the four-year contract would have called for three different rates: 17.5 percent, 22.5 percent, or 25 percent, depending on the plan a teacher uses. About 60 percent of teachers who currently pay 7 percent would in four years pay 22.5 percent, more than tripling what they pay for their premium.

This is on top of paying four to five times more for a doctor’s visit, quadrupling ER visits, and doubling prescription costs. In the interest of full disclosure, that’s only one of our three major plans, the others have different issues and concerns, but this being the most widely used, it makes sense to focus on it.

Carrying this concept forward, a teacher on the top step of the schedule with a master’s degree would realize an increase of $674. Assuming they have a family and use the more popular plan, the increase in their insurance premium (including a one-year offset) would be $1,025.64. That’s a loss of $351, and they haven’t gone to the doctor, filled a prescription, or had an urgent care or ER visit. If their family of four averages one visit to the doctor a month, and one prescription a month, the total net loss is minimally $591. This is their thank you for dedicating their careers to the children and future of Manchester.

In year two, that same dedicated teacher would see a salary increase of $680 with an insurance increase of $1,500. Year two’s loss equals $819. Year three? They would finally see a gain, of roughly $323.73. And in year four that increase would be $88.13. Over the life of a four-year deal, that teacher would have seen an average yearly increase of $102.97 or one-tenth of a percent on their current salary. Is it greedy to think that we could do better for those who do nothing more than prepare the children of this city for their, and our, future? I don’t think it is.

A picture is worth a thousand words, and this picture shows that there is more to the issue than just glossed-over numbers. There isn’t a problem in this city that isn’t linked to the education of our children. Conversely, there isn’t a positive outcome in this city that isn’t linked to the education of our children. As the city continues to diminish the importance of education, we must ask what it means for our tomorrow. One need only read the recent report done by the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies to see the dangerous path we’re going down. Righting the ship requires making education a priority, and that begins with respecting our teachers.

Benjamin Dick is president of the Manchester Education Association and an English teacher at Memorial High School.

October 14, 1817

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Founder of the Norwegian labor movement Marcus Thrane is born. In 1848, Thrane began to organize local workingmen’s associations and two years later, the organizations presented the government with their demands. Fearing a revolution, Thrane and 132 other leaders were arrested. Thrane was convicted of sedition in 1851 and spent four years in prison, mostly in solitary confinement, before emigrating to the United States.

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After Nurse Tests Positive For EBOLA, Nurse’s Union Calls For Higher Safety Standards And Training

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Ebola – RNs Call for Highest Standards for Protective Equipment, including Hazmat Suits, Hands-On Training Following  Report of First Nurse Infection in Dallas

2,000 RNs Across U.S. Say Hospitals Still Lagging

Following news Sunday that the first U.S. nurse has now tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, National Nurses United called for all hospitals to have in place the highest standard of optimal protections, including Hazmat suits, and hands-on training to protect all RNs, other hospital personnel to confront Ebola.

“There is no standard short of optimal in protective equipment and hands-on-training that is acceptable,” said RoseAnn DeMoro, executive director of National Nurses United, the largest U.S. organization of nurses.

“Nurses and other frontline hospital personnel must have the highest level of protective equipment, such as the Hazmat suits Emery University or the CDC themselves use while transporting patients and hands on training and drills for all RNs and other hospital personnel, that includes the practice putting on and taking off the optimal equipment,” DeMoro said Sunday.

NNU will host a national call-in conference call Wednesday with nurses across the U.S. to discuss concerns about U.S. hospital readiness for Ebola.

“Our call was set before today’s announcement based on steady reports from nurses at multiple hospitals who are alarmed at the inadequate preparation they see at their hospitals. The time to act is long overdue,” DeMoro said.

On the Wednesday (10-15-14) call, National Nurses United, which has been surveying nurses across the U.S. has been calling on U.S. hospitals to immediately upgrade emergency preparations for Ebola — including proper hands on training for RNs and other hospital personnel and keep proper protective equipment fully supplied for immediate use.

Hundreds of RNs are expected to call in on Wednesday for a discussion, and to ask questions, about U.S. hospital preparedness. The call is at 3 p.m. EST, 12 noon PST.

(Note to media: You may listen in to the call via webcast, at https://www.webcaster4.com/Webcast/Page/731/6167 or via phone, from U.S. or Canada, 1-877-384-4190 or international, 1-857-244-7412. Participant Code 26306511#. The call will be open to media questions after nurses’ questions.)

As of Sunday mid-day, 2,000 RNs at more 750 facilities in 46 states and the District of Columbia have responded to the NNU national survey. 

Current findings show:

  • 76 percent still say their hospital has not communicated to them any policy regarding potential admission of patients infected by Ebola
  • 85 percent say their hospital has not provided education on Ebola with the ability for the nurses to interact and ask questions
  • 37 percent say their hospital has insufficient current supplies of eye protection (face shields or side shields with goggles) for daily use on their unit; 36 percent say there are insufficient supplies of fluid resistant/impermeable gowns in their hospital
  • 39 percent say their hospital does not have plans to equip isolation rooms with plastic covered mattresses and pillows and discard all linens after use; only 8 percent said they were aware their hospital does have such a plan in place

NNU is calling for all U.S. hospitals to immediately implement a full emergency preparedness plan for Ebola, or other disease outbreaks. That includes:

  • Full training of hospital personnel, along with proper protocols and training materials for responding to outbreaks, with the ability for nurses to interact and ask questions.
  • Adequate supplies of Hazmat suits and other personal protective equipment.
  • Properly equipped isolation rooms to assure patient, visitor, and staff safety.
  • Proper procedures for disposal of medical waste and linens after use.

NNU is also calling for significant increases in provision of aid, financial, personnel, and protective equipment, from the U.S., other governments, and private corporate interests to the nations in West Africa directly affected to contain and stop the spread of Ebola.

Today in labor history for the week of October 13, 2014

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October 13
American Federation of Labor votes to boycott all German-made products as a protest against Nazi antagonism to organized labor within Germany – 1934

More than 1,100 office workers strike Columbia University in New York City. The mostly female and minority workers win union recognition and pay increases – 1985

National Basketball Association cancels regular season games for the first time in its 51-year history, during a player lockout. Player salaries and pay caps are the primary issue. The lockout lasts 204 days – 1998

Hundreds of San Jose Mercury News newspaper carriers end 4-day walkout with victory – 2000

October 14
Int’l Working People’s Association founded in Pittsburgh, Pa. – 1883

The Seafarers Int’l Union (SIU) is founded as an AFL alternative to what was then the CIO’s National Maritime Union. SIU is an umbrella organization of 12 autonomous unions of mariners, fishermen and boatmen working on U.S.-flagged vessels – 1938

Formal construction began today on what is expected to be a five-year, $3.9 billion replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River. It’s estimated the project would be employing 8,000 building trades workers over the span of the job – 2013

October 15
President Woodrow Wilson signs the Clayton Antitrust Act—often referred to as “Labor’s Magna Carta”—establishing that unions are not “conspiracies” under the law. It for the first time freed unions to strike, picket and boycott employers. In 2014.10.13history-joelguide.bookcoverthe years that followed, however, numerous state measures and negative court interpretations weakened the law – 1914
(Every Employee’s Guide to the Law, 3rd edition: The Clayton Antitrust Act was liberating, but on a day-to-day basis you need to know about current laws. This book goes into solid, useful detail about the federal and state laws that, together with union contracts, are designed to assure fairness and justice in the workplace.)

October 16
Queen Marie Antoinette, wife of Louis XVI, is beheaded during the French Revolution. When alerted that the peasants were suffering due to widespread bread shortages, lore has it that she replied, “Let them eat cake.” In fact she never said that, but workers were, justifiably, ready to believe anything bad about their cold-hearted royalty – 1793

Abolitionist John Brown leads 18 men, including five free blacks, in an attack on the Harper’s Ferry ammunition depot, the beginning of guerilla warfare against slavery – 1859

2014.10.13history-london.beer.floodOctober 17
A huge vat ruptures at a London brewery, setting off a domino effect of similar ruptures, and what was to become known as The London Beer Flood. Nearly 1.5 million liters of beer gushed into the streets drowning or otherwise causing the deaths of eight people, mostly poor people living in nearby basements – 1814

Labor activist Warren Billings is released from California’s Folsom Prison. Along with Thomas J. Mooney, Billings had been pardoned for a 1916 conviction stemming from a bomb explosion during a San Francisco Preparedness Day parade. He had always maintained his innocence – 1939

“Salt of the Earth” strike begins by the mostly Mexican-American members of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers Union Local 890 in Bayard, N.M. Strikers’ wives walked picket lines for seven months when their men were enjoined during the 14-month strike against the New Jersey Zinc Co. A great movie, see it! – 19502014.10.13history-workingstiffs.bookcover
(Working Stiffs, Union Maids, Reds, and Riffraff: An Expanded Guide to Films About Labor http://www.laborbooks.com/index.php?app=ecom&ns=prodshow&ref=movies: This wonderful book is an encyclopedic guide to 350 labor films from around the world, ranging from those you’ve heard of—Salt of the Earth, The Grapes of Wrath, Roger & Me—to those you’ve never heard of but will fall in love with once you see them.)

Twelve New York City firefighters die fighting a blaze in midtown Manhattan – 1966

Int’l Printing Pressmen’s & Assistants’ Union of North America merges with Int’l Stereotypers’, Electrotypers’ & Platemakers’ Union to become Printing & Graphic Communications Union – 1973

Industrial Union of Marine & Shipbuilding Workers of America merges with Int’l Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers – 1988

2014.10.13history-colonial.shoemakers.shopOctober 18
The “Shoemakers of Boston”—the first labor organization in what would later become the United States—was authorized by the Massachusetts Bay Colony – 1648

New York City agrees to pay women school teachers a rate equal to that of men – 1911

IWW Colorado Mine strike; first time all coal fields are out – 1927

Some 58,000 Chrysler Corp. workers strike for wage increases – 1939

The United Packinghouse Workers of America (UPWA) was formed as a self-governing union, an outgrowth of the CIO’s Packinghouse Workers Organizing Committee. UPWA merged with the Meatcutters union in 1968, which merged with the Retail Clerks in 1979 to form the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) – 1943

GM agrees to hire more women and minorities for five years as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment 2014.10.13history-gm.eeoc.settlementOpportunity Commission – 1983

October 19
The National Association of Letter Carriers achieves equalization of wages for all letter carriers, meaning city delivery carriers began receiving the same wages regardless of the size of the community in which they worked – 1949

The J.P. Stevens textile company is forced to sign its first union contract after a 17-year struggle in North Carolina and other southern states – 1980

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October 12, 1933

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Following a campaign by the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union to organize in Los Angeles’ garment industry whose workforce is 75% Latina, 4,000 garment workers in Los Angeles walk off the job, demanding union recognition, a 35-hour work week, and the minimum wage. The strike ended on November 6 with the workers winning some of their demands.

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