AFGE Labor Day Video Shows Why Unions Are Needed Now More than Ever

Video, Greeting from Nation’s Largest Federal Employee Union Highlights Need for Unions Then and Now

Screen shot 2014-08-30 at 12.00.24 PMWASHINGTON – A new Labor Day video from the American Federation of Government Employees illustrates what unions have done for working people and why they remain relevant today.

The 2-minute video, “Unions: Now More than Ever,” shines a spotlight on all of the rights and protections that exist today in the workplace because of union activism.

The video also explains why collective organizing remains vitally important today, since so many employees work for substandard pay and benefits and don’t have a voice in the workplace.

The video was produced in-house by AFGE’s Communications Department. It is also available on YouTube at http://youtu.be/BA0MJZr6124.

In addition to the video, AFGE National President J. David Cox also has drafted a Labor Day message for the 670,000 federal and D.C. government employees who belong to AFGE. The full text of the message follows.

A Call to Action This Labor Day

As the nation marks another Labor Day, there is little to celebrate for many workers in this country. Millions of Americans work two or more jobs yet remain in poverty, thanks to substandard wages and benefits.

Most federal employees enjoy the benefits of belonging to a union, but most American workers have faced overwhelming employer opposition to exercising those same rights. Corporations have used their financial might and undue influence in Congress to weaken laws that are supposed to protect workers and to wage expensive battles aimed at defeating every attempt by employees to form unions.

As the old saying goes, those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.

In the late 1800s, workers who toiled for the Pullman Company outside Chicago suffered countless abuses at the hands of robber baron turned company owner George Pullman. Pullman literally owned the town where his employees lived, and he kept them under his thumb by keeping wages low and rents high. Employees worked 16-hour days yet couldn’t make ends meet. Sound familiar?

Employees banded together and shut down the company, and nearly every other railway workers refused to handle Pullman cars in solidarity with their striking brothers. When the military and U.S. Marshals were called in to break the strike, resulting in the death of 13 strikers and injuries to dozens more, the American people were outraged. The voice of labor was so united that the federal government responded by codifying a day of national honor for American organized labor and its achievements, in an attempt to pacify labor activists.

In the ensuing years, however, the American public has lost sight of why unions still matter, and we as unionists have failed in answering the question.

The facts are on our side. Between 1947 and 1973, the heyday of unionism in this country, productivity increased by 97 percent and workers’ compensation increased by 95 percent. Since then, however, productivity has increased by 80 percent, while employee compensation has risen just 11 percent.

As we mark another Labor Day, let us recall that this day was earned through great collective action. The Pullman Porters serve as but one reminder that American labor has had to—and must continue to—fight for every victory. As the leader of the later Porters’ Strike, A. Philip Randolph said, “Justice is never given; it is exacted and the struggle must be continuous for freedom is never a final fact, but a continuing evolving process to higher and higher levels of human, social, economic, political and religious relationship.”

Labor Day is no gift – so get out there and fight! 

J. David Cox Sr.

National President, AFGE

Teamsters Local 633 Endorse Diane Sheehan For Executive Council

Teamsters LogoToday Executive Council candidate Diane Sheehan was endorsed by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters local 633.  After receiving the endorsement Diane Sheehan released the following statment:

“I am proud, honored and truly appreciative to receive the endorsement of the Teamsters Local 633 for Executive Council, District 5.

As a current Alderman At-Large in Nashua, I am well aware of the importance of having a solid, professional workforce. Investing in good employees is good for the long term health of our community, our economy, and our quality of life.  My track record of commitment to our labor forces is something I am proud of, and glad that is it noted by the Teamsters We see the importance and value of treating employees with respect, and compensation when we watch what just happened with Market Basket. People matter.  I pledge to bring to the Council their cares and concerns and to work as hard in representing them, and all the people of District 5, as they come to work committed each day.

I humbly thank them for the confidence they have placed in me.”

UAW Announces New Cadillacs To Be Made By UAW Workers In Spring Hill Tenn.

In a Victory for Spring Hill Workers and Families, UAW and GM Announce Cadillac SRX As New Product for Spring Hill Manufacturing, $191 Million Investment in SGE Program

Spring Hill, Tenn. – Today, in a victory for Tennessee’s workers and families, UAW International Union and Local 1853 joined with General Motors executives to announce the Cadillac SRX as one of two future mid-size vehicles set for manufacturing at the Spring Hill plant, as well as a $191 million investment at the Spring Hill Complex for a new Small Gas Engine (SGE) program. Today’s news means that GM will retain 415 jobs at the Spring Hill facility.

“GM’s investment today is a huge testament to its confidence in Spring Hill’s workers, and is a great example of the economic opportunities we’ve been able to create here in Tennessee as a result of the collective bargaining process,” said UAW Vice President Cindy Estrada. “Today’s announcement is proof we can achieve great things when workers have a seat at the table and the chance to share their ideas for how to constantly improve the products we manufacture. It’s great to see our union continue to grow, but even greater to see how the people of Tennessee will benefit from these good jobs. I’m proud to stand here with UAW autoworkers and our colleagues from GM who worked together to make this huge victory for Spring Hill a reality.”

The GM plant in Spring Hill currently employs 1,575 workers who construct engines, stamping, and molding for GM vehicles. After the plant was idled in 2009, it was a priority of the UAW to see it reopened in 2011, when UAW members used the power of collective bargaining to bring these jobs back to the local community.

“I’m proud of our workers here in Spring Hill, and excited about these new investments that will allow us to continue growing and producing quality automobile parts here in Tennessee,” said UAW Region 8 Director Ray Curry. “These expansions are a clear sign of the hard work and dedication of the members of UAW Local 1853 and the strong relationship the UAW and GM have built. When workers are allowed to have a seat at the collective bargaining table, we are best positioned to make quality products and bring more jobs into our communities.”

Also Wednesday, UAW and GM announced that GM will invest $49.7 million at the Bedford, Ind., Castings Plan for SGE components, resulting in the creation or retention of 43 jobs.

FairPoint Walks Away From Bargaining Process, Declares Impasse

Unions Accuse Company of Federal Labor Law Violations

Manchester, NH–Unions representing nearly 2,000 employees of FairPoint Communications in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont met with the company on August 27 in Nashua, NH. The unions made a comprehensive proposal despite the company’s rejection of several earlier proposals.

The company then waited several hours before notifying the unions by email that the parties are at impasse and that the company would impose its last contract proposals at 12:01 a.m. on August 28.

“We strongly disagree with the company. We have not reached impasse. The company should stay at the table and continue to work with us to reach an acceptable agreement,” said Peter McLaughlin, Business Manager of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 2327 in Augusta and chair of the unions’ bargaining committee.

The unions have filed charges with the National Labor Relations Board accusing the company of violating federal law by not bargaining in good faith.

“We are deeply disappointed that FairPoint has walked away from the bargaining process,” said Don Trementozzi, President of Communications Workers of America (CWA) Local 1400. “We have worked tirelessly for months to negotiate an agreement that is fair to our members, our customers, and the company. We believe the company never intended to reach an agreement with us, but has been pushing towards this outcome all along.”

According to union leaders, the company has rejected every significant proposal the union has put forward since bargaining began in April and has refused to offer any counter proposals since before the contract expired on August 2.

“The company has refused to bargain with us, and their negotiators have even attempted to intimidate and bully us throughout the process,” said Glenn Brackett, Business Manager of IBEW Local 2320 in Manchester, NH. “But our members will not be intimidated by this company. They are determined to stand up for good jobs and our customers.”

Union leaders say FairPoint management wants to outsource hundreds of good jobs in Northern New England to low wage, out-of-state contractors. The company’s proposals would be devastating for communities that depend on well-trained and experienced workers to build and maintain their landlines, cell towers, DSL, and even 911 systems.

“FairPoint’s employees are some of the best trained, most experienced telecommunications workers in this country,” said Mike Spillane, Business Manager of IBEW Local 2326 in Burlington, VT. “But FairPoint executives are determined to outsource their work to low road contractors no matter the impact on customers and our communities. We will continue to fight their attempts to outsource our future.”

The union bargaining team will meet with its attorneys and other key advisors on Thursday morning to assess the situation and decide on next steps. In the meantime, the union has notified all members to continue working until further notice.

IBEW System Council T9 represents nearly 1,700 FairPoint employees in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. CWA Local 1400 represents nearly 300 employees in the three states.

Linda Tanner A Real Candidate For Working Families

One of the goals of the NH Labor News is to help Granite Staters get to know the candidates who are running for office in New Hampshire. We focus on candidates who support working families, particularly those candidates who are working to rebuild the middle class and strengthen our rights as workers.

This week’s focus is on State Senate District 8 candidate Linda Tanner.

Linda Tanner NH Senate Candidate District 8
Background Information for Rep. Linda Tanner

Linda is longtime community activist, teacher, and coach. Linda has dedicated her entire life to helping others and improving her community. For over 30 years as a teacher and coach at Kearsarge Regional High School, Linda worked tirelessly to help her students succeed in and out of the classroom. During her career at Kearsarge, she served as a Department Chair, worked with the School to Work program and developed a state championship tennis program. She was honored by the NH Interscholastic Athletic Association for her years of service and elected to the NH Coaches Hall of Fame for Girls Tennis. She received her Bachelor of Science in Health Education from East Stroudsburg University and her Masters from Dartmouth College. In 2012 she was elected to the New Hampshire House of Representatives from Sullivan County, District 9.

 

As a public school teacher, were you involved with your local union?

I was president of my local association, the Kearsarge Regional Education Association for three terms. I participated on many negotiation teams, worked with members on issues at the local level, and worked with management towards better working conditions. I am a lifetime member of the NEA NH and have their endorsement for this campaign.

 

As a former teacher, I am sure you have a lot to say about the current public education system. Can you give me two things you would like to see changed?  And are these changes that you can enact from the NH Senate?

Public education has been under attack by those who would privatize education, eliminate compulsory education, and eliminate teachers’ unions. I ran for my House seat because I wanted to stop these political maneuvers that were undermining what, I feel, is the most valuable institution for maintaining democracy.

I think there is a great deal we could do to promote and fund our public education system in New Hampshire. I definitely feel the move from the punitive No Child Left Behind to the Common Core is a move that will help students. The Common Core sets standards but does not dictate pedagogy, deals with progress instead of achievement or failure and is the right course towards improvement and consistency. Just like other programs, it needs to be tweaked and re-visited. I would like to see educators who are working in the schools as teachers have a larger input into programs and initiatives.

As a high school teacher, I worked with a school-to-work program for the average student to encourage them towards further education and give some basic instruction in job skills. I taught Health Occupations Co-op for several years. I feel this is a very valuable program that should be expanded to teach not only content but job skills such as being on time, being able to speak to people, shake hands, show respect for co-workers and your product.  Recently I visited the Job Corps Training facility in Vermont. We are currently building a facility in Manchester. This type of program, which targets low income youth, is vital to providing vocational training in a setting that also emphasizes those job skills. It gives an opportunity for young people to better their position and at the same time provide workers for key jobs in our State.

As a Senator I will work to help New Hampshire schools become a model system that supports innovation, is relevant to the world of work and careers, and maintains rigorous standards for all school children.

 

You are running for the NH Senate Seat in District 8 that is currently held by Sen. Bob Odell. In what ways are you similar or different from Sen. Odell?

I found my voting aligned in many areas with Senator Odell.  I voted to repeal the death penalty, expand Medicaid, and deal with the issues around the Medical Enhancement Tax. However, Senator Odell voted against returning the period for teachers to be fired without cause or hearing from 5 to 3 years, voted against medical marijuana, and voted for the repeal of automatic continuation requirement for public employees’ collective bargaining agreements. These are three examples of bills he opposed that I would have supported.

IMG_0067This Senate seat has been, under Senator Odell, a moderate vote in a 13 to 11 Republican majority. My election to the seat will balance the parties at 12 all, which would make a major shift – especially on Labor issues. Medicaid expansion has a clause that requires renewal during this next session. Both Republican candidates have stated that they will try to repeal the Medicaid expansion, fight ‘Obama Care,’ and make NH a ‘Right to Work State’ as a priority. If either of the candidates opposing me wins this seat: Medicaid will be repealed, leaving thousands without medical insurance; and ‘Right to Work” for less will be passed along with other legislation that will hurt working men and women.

 

The current minimum wage is $7.25 and the GOP-led legislature repealed the NH Minimum Wage law. What would you do as Senator to help push NH toward a real living wage? Last year, one proposal was to raise the state minimum wage over two years to $9.00/hour. Do you think $9.00 is the right number? Or do you think it should be $10.10 as the POTUS is pushing, or even higher? 

First, we need to reinstate a NH Minimum wage that was repealed under the Republican leadership of Speaker O’Brien. I served on the House Labor Committee in this past term. The bill that was introduced should be reintroduced in this next term. This bill offered modest increases over time and originally had a provision for further increases based on economic indicators. I think we need to have a bill that will pass both The House and Senate. I hope to be one of those Senators to move this piece of legislation forward.

Do you have any legislation that you would like to see or have ideas on proposing if you are elected?  

I want to defend against the so called ‘right to work’ bills. If those bills pass it will let non-union workers benefit from our hard work in negotiations without paying their fair share. It’s a union-busting tactic.

I want to ensure fairness in workers’ compensation laws for those hurt on the job – so if they can’t work, they will still be able to keep their homes and survive. At the same time, I want to see how we can reduce the rate for employers. I want to establish a minimum wage and increase it above the present $7.25 so everyone has the dignity of a decent wage. I want to protect workers from pay cards and title loans that are stripping away hard earned money with excessive fees and astronomical interest rates. I want to offer solutions for the current lack of affordable and accessible elderly and work force housing.

 

If you could pick one issue from your campaign to highlight, what issue would that be?  

I am a person who is running for this Senate seat not to be someone special or advance a radical agenda but to work on legislation that will help the working men and women of this State. I taught for 35 years in the NH public schools and over that time, you see the communities, the State, through the lives of your students. I know the successes, the struggles, and the heartbreaking issues many of our citizens face. I want to be their voice in the Legislature.

 

Why should the labor community support your campaign?  

I am a lifelong union member. As a teacher for 35 years and continuing through retirement, I have been a member of the National Education Association. During my years at Kearsarge Regional High School, I was President of my local for three terms. I served on many negotiations and collective bargaining teams working for high quality education, good working conditions, livable salaries and benefits.  I proudly served as a State Representative for Sullivan County and as a member of the House Labor Committee.  I have the experience, knowledge and the political will to help the working men and women our State.

 

What can people do to help your campaign?

I can’t win this election alone. The opposition is well-funded and as committed to winning this seat as we are. I need your help to win this election. I need your vote and I need you to talk with family, friends, co-workers and neighbors to urge them to vote for me. Also, with this large, rural district, we need funds for mailings, ads, and signs. Any amount you can send to us will help us get our message out.

Please see our website lindatanner.org for more information

 

 

 

 

Chris Pappas Receives Endorsement of New England Regional Council Of Carpenters

Chris Pappas, via Pappas2012.com

Manchester, NH– Following a strong first term in office, Manchester business owner and Executive Councilor Chris Pappas has received the endorsement of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America Local 118 based on his unwavering commitment to being the eyes and ears of working families in Concord. The Carpenters represent approximately 3,000 Carpenters, Piledrivers, Woodframers and Floorlayers in New Hampshire.

“The United Brotherhood of Carpenters Local Union 118 are proud to endorse Chris Pappas for a second term on the Executive Council. Councilor Pappas brings a strong bipartisan brand of leadership to the Council that cuts through partisanship to get the working families of New Hampshire the results they deserve. Chris has proven himself as a strong advocate for the people of District 4 by being their eyes and ears in Concord, making sure all their voices are heard in state government,” said Local 118 Business Agent Joseph Donahue. 

“The working men and women of the Carpenters understand there is too much at stake this election to sit on the sidelines, which is why we are mobilizing our grassroots base to get out into our neighborhoods to make sure voters know that a vote for Chris Pappas is a vote for New Hampshire’s middle class,” Donahue concluded.

“Ensuring New Hampshire remains a great place to live, work and raise a family remains my top priority on the Council and that means growing and strengthening our middle class,” said Councilor Pappas. “I am extremely honored to have the support of the New England Council of Carpenters and look forward to continuing my work with them to keep New Hampshire moving forward.”

Worker Wins Update: Increased Wages and Organizing Successes Highlight Banner Month

WASHINGTON, DC – From increases in the minimum wage to successful organizing efforts at some of America’s largest companies, workers have led notable wins over the recent months.

The following are a sample of victories won by workers:

Organizing Victories

AFSCME Sets Organizing Goal, Almost Doubles It: AFSCME President Lee Saunders announced that the union has organized more than 90,000 workers this year, nearly doubling its 2014 goal of 50,000.

Tennessee Auto Workers to Create New Local Union at VW PlantAuto workers at Volkswagen’s plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee announced the formation of UAW Local 42, a new local that will give workers an increased voice in the operation of the German car maker’s US facility. UAW organizers continue gain momentum, as the union has the support of nearly half of the plant’s 1,500 workers, which would make the union the facility’s exclusive collective bargaining agent.

California Casino Workers Organize: Workers at the new Graton Resort & Casino voted to join Unite HERE Local 2850 of Oakland, providing job security for 600 gambling, maintenance, and food and beverage workers.

Virgin America Flight Attendants Vote to Join TWU: Flight attendants at Virgin America voted to join the Transport Workers Union of America (TWU), citing the success of TWU in bargaining fair contracts for Southwest Airlines flight attendants.

Maryland Cab Drivers Join National Taxi Workers Alliance: Cab drivers in Montgomery County, Maryland announced their affiliation with the National Taxi Workers Alliance, citing low wages and unethical behavior by employers as their reason to affiliate with the national union.

Retail and Restaurant Workers Win Big, Organize Small: Small groups of workers made big strides as over a dozen employees at a Subway restaurant in Bloomsbury, NJ voted to join the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. Meanwhile, Cosmetics and Fragrance workers at a Macy’s store in Massachusetts won an NLRB ruling that will allow them to vote on forming a union.

Minnesota Home Care Workers Take Key Step to Organize: Home health care workers in Minnesota presented a petition to state officials that would allow a vote on whether they will form a union for more than 26,000 eligible workers.

New York Television Writers-Producers Join Writers Guild: Writers and producers from Original Media, a New York City-based production company, voted to join the Writers Guild of America, citing low wages, long work schedules, and no health care.

Raising Wages Victories

Fast Food Workers Win in New NLRB Ruling: The National Labor Relations Board ruled that McDonald’s could be held jointly responsible with its franchises for labor violations and wage disputes. The NLRB ruling makes it easier for workers to organize individual McDonald’s locations, and could result in better pay and conditions for workers.

Workers Increasingly Have Access to Paid Sick Leave: Cities such as San Diego, CA and Eugene, OR have passed measures mandating paid sick leave, providing workers with needed flexibility and making workplaces safer for all.

Student Athletes See Success, Improved Conditions: College athletic programs are strengthening financial security measuresfor student athletes in the wake of organizing efforts by Northwestern University football players. In addition, the future is bright as the majority of incoming college football players support forming a union.

San Diego Approves Minimum Wage Hike, Portland, ME Starts Process: Even as Congress has failed to raise the minimum wage, localities throughout the country have delivered action. San Diego will raise the minimum wage to $11.50 an hour by 2017, and the Portland, MEMinimum Wage Advisory Committee will consider an increase to their minimum wage which would take effect in 2015.

Joan Helps Rebuild Her Local Community With Skills Acquired As A Union Carpenter (VIDEO)

Joan Bennett

Joan Bennett

I wanted to share with you this great video from the New England Regional Council of Carpenters highlighting one woman’s day as a carpenter, a union member, and a local advocate.

“Joan Bennett, active member of Carpenters Local Union 33 in Boston, shares a day in her life as she volunteers her carpentry skills for a Rebuilding Together Boston project in Dorchester on April 26, 2014. This video was shot as part of the One Day in Boston initiative.”

We need more video’s like this to show all the good things that union members across the country are doing to help rebuild our communities, one house at a time, on their own time.

August 18, 1932

AFGE-Logo-2

The American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) receives a charter from the American Federation of Labor. The union was born during the Great Depression, when wage cuts and furloughs were the rule in an economy that was steadily contracting. Today, AFGE is the larges federal employee union, representing 650,000 federal and D.C. government workers nationwide and overseas.

Source Link

Today in labor history for the week of August 18, 2014

2014.08.18history-wevd

August 18
Radio station WEVD, named for Eugene V. Debs, goes on the air in New York City, operated by The Forward Association as a memorial to the labor and socialist leader – 1927
(The Bending Cross: A Biography of Eugene V. Debs: Eugene V. Debs was a labor activist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who captured the heart and soul of the nation’s working people. He was brilliant, sincere, compassionate and scrupulously honest. A founder of one of the nation’s first industrial unions, the American Railway Union, he went on to help launch the Industrial Workers of the World — the Wobblies. A man of firm beliefs and dedication, he ran for President of the United States five times under the banner of the Socialist Party, in 1912 earning 6 percent of the popular vote. Many union activists and labor scholars see Debs as the definitive labor leader.)

Founding of the American Federation of Government Employees, following a decision by the National Federation of Federal Employees (later to become part of the Int’l Association of Machinists) to leave the AFL – 1932

August 19
First edition of IWW Little Red Song Book published – 1909

Some 2,000 United Railroads streetcar service workers and supporters parade down San Francisco’s Market Street in support of pay demands and against the company’s anti-union policies. The strike failed in late November in the face of more than 1,000 strikebreakers, some of them imported from Chicago – 1917

Founding of the Maritime Trades Dept. of the AFL-CIO, to give “workers employed in the maritime industry and its allied trades a voice in shaping national policy” – 1946

Phelps-Dodge copper miners in Morenci and Clifton, Ariz., are confronted by tanks, helicopters, 426 state troopers and 325 National Guardsmen brought in to walk strikebreakers through picket lines in what was to become a failed 3-year fight by the Steelworkers and other unions – 19832014.08.18history-amfa-strike

Some 4,400 mechanics, cleaners and custodians, members of AMFA at Northwest Airlines, strike the carrier over job security, pay cuts and work rule changes. The 14-month strike was to fail, with most union jobs lost to replacements and outside contractors – 2005

August 20
The Great Fire of 1910, a wildfire that consumed about 3 million acres in Washington, Idaho and Montana—an area about the size of Connecticut—claimed the lives of 78 firefighters over two days. It is believed to be the largest, although not deadliest, fire in U.S. history – 1910

Deranged relief postal service carrier Patrick “Crazy Pat” Henry Sherrill shoots and kills 14 coworkers, and wounds another six, before killing himself at an Edmond, Okla., postal facility. Supervisors had ignored warning signs of Sherrill’s instability, investigators later found; the shootings came a day after he had been reprimanded for poor work. The incident inspired the objectionable term “going postal” – 1986

August 21
Slave revolt led by Nat Turner begins in Southampton County, Va. – 1831

August 22
Five flight attendants form the Air Line Stewardesses Association, the first labor union representing flight attendants. They were 2014.08.18history-first.contactreacting to an industry in which women were forced to retire at the age of 32, remain single, and adhere to strict weight, height and appearance requirements. The association later became the Association of Flight Attendants, now a division of the Communications Workers of America – 1945
(From First Contact to First Contract: A Union Organizer’s Handbook is a no-nonsense tool from veteran labor organizer and educator Bill Barry. He looks to his own vast experience to document and help organizers through all the stages of a unionization campaign, from how to get it off the ground to how to bring it home with a signed contract and a strong bargaining unit.)

Int’l Broom & Whisk Makers Union disbands – 1963

Joyce Miller, a vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing & Textile Workers, becomes first female member of the AFL-CIO Executive Council – 1980

The Kerr-McGee Corp. agrees to pay the estate of the late Karen Silkwood $1.38 million, settling a 10-year-old nuclear contamination 2014.08.18history-silkwood.carlawsuit. She was a union activist who died in 1974 under suspicious circumstances on her way to talk to a reporter about safety concerns at her plutonium fuel plant in Oklahoma – 1986

Int’l Longshore & Warehouse Union granted a charter by the AFL-CIO – 1988

August 23
The U.S. Commission on Industrial Relations is formed by Congress, during a period of great labor and social unrest. After three years, and hearing witnesses ranging from Wobblies to capitalists, it issued an 11-volume report frequently critical of capitalism. The New York Herald characterized the Commission’s president, Frank P. Walsh, as “a Mother Jones in trousers” – 1912

Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, accused of murder and tried unfairly, were executed on this day. The case became an international cause and sparked demonstrations and strikes throughout the world – 1927

Seven merchant seamen crewing the SS Baton Rouge Victory lost their lives when the ship was sunk by Viet Cong action en route to Saigon – 1966

2014.08.18history-chavez.fightFarm Workers Organizing Committee (to later become United Farm Workers of America) granted a charter by the AFL-CIO – 1966
(The Fight in the Fields: No man in this century has had more of an impact on the lives of Hispanic Americans, and especially farmworkers, than the legendary Cesar Chavez. Born to migrant workers in 1927, he attended 65 elementary schools before finishing 7th grade, the end of his formal education. Through hard work, charisma and uncommon bravery he moved on to become founder and leader of the United Farm Workers of America (UFW) and to win a degree of justice for tens of thousands of workers… and to set a moral example for the nation.)

August 24
The Gatling Gun Co.—manufacturers of an early machine gun—writes to B&O Railroad Co. President John W. Garrett during a strike, urging their product be purchased to deal with the “recent riotous disturbances around the country.” Says the company: “Four or five men only are required to operate (a gun), and Source Link