Home Care Workers Vow to Stand Up for Good Jobs and Quality Home Care in Wake of Harris v. Quinn Ruling

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Caregivers to Work with States and Consumers to Ensure a Strong Voice for Care

WASHINGTON, DC – Home care workers and consumers are ready to stand up for quality home care in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Harris v. Quinn today.

“No court case is going to stand in the way of home care workers coming together to have a strong voice for good jobs and quality home care,” said SEIU President Mary Kay Henry. “At a time when wages remain stagnant and income inequality is out of control, joining together in a union is the only proven way home care workers have of improving their lives and the lives of the people they care for.”

The ruling places at risk a system of consumer-directed home care in Illinois that has proven successful in raising wages, providing affordable health care benefits, and increasing training. The number of elderly Americans will increase dramatically in the coming years. States need to build a stable, qualified workforce to meet the growing need for home care—and having a strong union for home care workers is the only approach that has proven effective.

“I count on my home care provider for so much—I wouldn’t be able to work or get through the day without her,” said Rahnee Patrick, a home care consumer and advocate from ACCESS Living in Chicago.” “I’m worried that I could lose her if her wages and benefits don’t keep up with the cost of living.”

The case was brought by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, an extreme anti-worker group whose funders include billionaires like Charles Koch and the Walton family. It is the latest in a decades-long attack on the rights of working people to join together to improve their jobs and the quality of services they provide.

“They are trying to divide us and limit our power, but we won’t stop standing together for our families and our consumers” said Flora Johnson, a home care provider from Chicago. “Before we formed our union, I made less than $6 an hour, but by uniting we are set to make $13 an hour by the end of the year. I know from experience that we are stronger together.”

“For our parents and grandparents to get the care they need to live at home, workers need a strong voice in a union,” Henry said. “I know that Flora Johnson other SEIU members are determined to keep up the fight to end poverty wages and ensure quality care.”

Hey, Supreme Court: What about States’ Rights? (Harris Vs Quinn)

CC DBKING

10thAmendmentIt seems to me that today’s Supreme Court decision was driven more by ideology than by an understanding of how labor unions work in practice.

It seems to me that the Court gave very little consideration to states’ rights, particularly:

  • whether the State of Illinois should have the right to determine which categories of employees it considers to be “state employees” and
  • whether states – as employers – should have the right to decide whether they want to include “agency fee” provisions in their union contracts.

And I’m wondering whether the next SCOTUS decision will strike down states’ rights to decide – for themselves – whether or not to even have public employees’ unions. (Some states have chosen NOT to have public-sector unions. New Hampshire didn’t have public-sector collective bargaining until 1975, when it was established by Republican Governor Mel Thomson.)

Shouldn’t Illinois have the right to decide – for itself – whether the home-based caregivers that it pays with Medicaid money should be considered its “employees” for purposes of collective bargaining?

Shouldn’t Illinois have the right to decide – for itself – whether or not to include an “agency fee” provision in its union contracts?

Maybe I missed it…? But when I read through the decision, I didn’t see a whole lot of respect or deference given to the rights of the Illinois Legislature to set the employment conditions of the people it views as its “employees.”

Every time the New Hampshire Legislature considers a so-called “Right to Work” bill, we hear from private employers that it would infringe on their rights to set working conditions for their employees.

Shouldn’t state governments have that same right?

 

After SCOTUS Destroyed The Voting Rights Act, Labor Leaders Call On Congress To Protect Voters

Supreme Court of the US (Image Mark Fischer Flickr)

“The right to vote is precious and almost sacred, and one of the most important blessings of our democracy,” wrote Rep. John Lewis. “Today we must be vigilant in protecting that blessing.”

Supreme Court of the US (Image Mark Fischer Flickr)

Supreme Court of the US (Image Mark Fischer Flickr)

 

The 1960’s were a tumultuous time in America, especially for Americans of color. The battle for civil rights was being played out in city streets across the country. The evening news was full of demonstrations and rallies where people were gathering to fight for equality, and to be allowed their Constitutionally protected right to participate in our democracy.

Demonstrations, walkouts and sit-ins led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Both laws pushed America in new bold new direction, working to ensure everyone has a voice in our democracy. For decades Congress reauthorized the Voting Rights Act, to ensure that everyone, regardless of color, had the right to vote.

Yesterday was the first anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case of Shelby County v. Holder, which severely undermined the Voting Rights Act. The Supreme Court ruling threatened the voting rights of millions of Americans.

Rep John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis

“Today, the Supreme Court stuck a dagger into the heart of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most effective pieces of legislation Congress has passed in the last 50 years,” said Congressman John Lewis after the Supreme Court ruling in 2013.

“Our country has changed,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote for the majority. “While any racial discrimination in voting is too much, Congress must ensure that the legislation it passes to remedy that problem speaks to current conditions.”

Representative Lewis continued, “I disagree with the court that the history of discrimination is somehow irrelevant today. The record clearly demonstrates numerous attempts to impede voting rights still exist, and it does not matter that those attempts are not as “pervasive, widespread or rampant” as they were in 1965. One instance of discrimination is too much in a democracy.”

“Despite the Court’s opinion, voter discrimination based on race is not a thing of the past—it is a current reality that persists to this day,” said Mary Kay Henry, President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). “We saw efforts to disenfranchise African American and Latino voters in the 2012 election cycle in Texas, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and elsewhere – but voters there were protected by Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. In the wake of the Shelby decision, many of these jurisdictions rushed to implement new laws in time for the 2014 election cycle – the same unfair and discriminatory voting practices that had been rejected by the Department of Justice and the Federal Courts under the Voting Rights Act.

After the Supreme Court ruling, a handful of states moved quickly to push new “Voter ID” laws that have notoriously disenfranchised voters of color. Texas also rammed through their new gerrymandered districts that, prior to this decision, would have required a pre-clearance from the Department of Justice.

“Since 2010, 22 states have passed new voting restrictions that make it more difficult to vote,” Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy said, citing a new report from the Brennan Center for Justice. “Of the 11 states with the highest African-American turnout in 2008, seven of those have new restrictions in place.”

Yesterday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a public hearing on Senator Leahy’s bill to restore the Voting Rights Act.

“In the audience for Wednesday’s hearing was Ernest Montgomery, a member of the Calera City Council in Alabama and one of several black residents who intervened in the Shelby County lawsuit to try to protect pre-clearance. He said any update to the Voting Rights Act should restore pre-clearance for Alabama.” (Burlington Free Press)

“It would make our state leaders much more cautious about having any more violations and make sure we do the right thing,” Montgomery said.

After a year of waiting, and the unparalleled attacks on voting rights, we have seen a renewed effort for Congress to pass a new Voting Rights Act.

“That is why Members of Congress must come together and develop a fix to the Voting Rights Act – as the Court’s majority opinion recommended – that protects all Americans’ right to vote, regardless of who they are and where they live,” Henry stated. “We are hopeful that Congress can work together to restore the protections against racial discrimination that the Voting Rights Act is meant to provide for all Americans.”

“Fully restoring the Voting Rights Act is one of the only ways to give every American the fundamental right to participate in our democracy. Today’s bipartisan hearing on the Voting Rights Amendment Act is the first step in the fight to restore voting rights, the lifeblood of our democracy,” stated Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers.

“Our elected leaders should do everything in their power to make our democracy more accessible,” continued Weingarten. “Sadly, the Shelby decision and other state measures have made it easier for monied interests to have a voice and harder for those who have been historically disenfranchised.”

“The right to vote is precious and almost sacred, and one of the most important blessings of our democracy,” wrote Rep. John Lewis. “Today we must be vigilant in protecting that blessing.”

“As we approach another election, we must join together and reclaim the promise of our democracy, reverse the Shelby decision and enact meaningful protections at the ballot box,” concluded Weingarten.

AFT created a petition calling for action from the US House on a new Voting Rights Act.

Will Congress do the right thing to protect the voting rights of millions of Americans, or will they continue to sit there, with their hands over their eyes, pretending that people of color are not being refused their Constitutional right to vote?

NH State Employees’ Association (SEIU 1984) Opposes Privatization Takeover Of USPS, Joins Staples Boycott

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Concord, NH, June 9, 2014 – At the quarterly meeting of the SEA/SEIU 1984 Council, members unanimously resolved to support U.S. Postal workers and enter into a boycott of Staples, the office supply retailer.  Staples has entered into an agreement with the U.S. Postal Service to operate postal counters in more than 82 “test sites” throughout the country.  The Postal Service plans to expand this operation to more than 1,500 Staples store across the United States.

Staples plans to replace good-paying union jobs with non-union low-wage jobs held by workers who have no accountability for the safety and security of the mail. This is nothing less than a direct assault on good middle class jobs and on public postal workers.

“It’s clear the battle lines have been drawn in Corporate America’s plan to take over not just our politicians, but core governmental services.  And that’s why it’s also clear that more union brothers and sisters must step forward on that battlefield!  I will gladly stand with our US Postal Workers in their effort to stop Staples, the office supply retailer, from taking over trusted public services to boost corporate profit margins at the expense of hard working taxpayers, and I ask you to as well,” said Diana Lacey, President SEA/SEIU Local 1984 in an announcement of the boycott to members earlier today.

“We cannot thank SEIU local #1984 enough for joining our boycott of Staples. On behalf of Manchester Area Local President, Dana Coletti, and all people who believe in keeping the U.S. Postal Service as a public service, we appreciate this show of solidarity. Together we can and will end this drive to privatize all public services,” said Janice Kelble, Legislative Director, NH Postal Workers Union.

SEA/SEIU 1984 is latest labor union to join the cause to preserve this essential service.  SEA/SEIU 1984 joins NH AFL-CIO and AFT-New Hampshire in support of the postal workers.

SEA/SEIU 1984 is the exclusive representative of most state of NH employees, as well as county and municipal workers across the state.  The labor organization also represents workers at Hampstead Hospital.

SEIU’s Henry: Seattle Workers Show the Way by Winning $15/Hour Wage Floor

Seattle Space Needle (FLIKR Wonderlane) CROPPED
Image by Wonderland Flickr

Image by Wonderland Flickr

WASHINGTON, DC - After the Seattle City Council voted to lift the minimum wage in Seattle to $15 per hour, Mary Kay Henry, President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), issued the following statement:

“Like working Americans across the country, the 2.1 million members of SEIU are tremendously inspired by today’s breakthrough vote by the Seattle City Council to lift the wage floor there to $15 per hour. Congratulations to everyone in the coalition who fought to make this victory possible.

“We are all better off when working-class families have enough money in their pockets to pay for their basic needs and put money back into their neighborhoods to strengthen their community.

“This landmark victory happened because fast food workers stood with janitors, nurses, hospital workers, child care workers and home care aides to fight for wages that boost the economy. They stuck together, went on strike, and made their voices heard. They spoke out to say that it’s wrong that ordinary people work hard but live paycheck to paycheck so that irresponsible corporations can set new records for profits.

“This victory in the Seattle shows the way for workers in other cities who are fighting to lift their local minimum wage rates. The courage of fast food workers is inspiring for other people working in service jobs who are fighting to boost pay standards across an industry.

“It is a huge step forward as workers across the country build a movement to make sure that fast-growing service jobs pay people enough to become the foundation of the next American middle class. Together we will fight to build an economy that works for everyone, with broadly-shared prosperity for all of us.”

SEIU’s President Henry And 100 Workers Arrested at McDonald’s Shareholders’ Meeting

SEIU Protest TWITTER
SEIU Protest TWITTER

Image from @SEIU on Twitter

WASHINGTON, DC – Following her arrest at the McDonald’s shareholders’ meeting outside of Chicago, Mary Kay Henry, President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), issued the following statement:

“Earlier today, I was arrested outside of McDonald’s world headquarters alongside more than 100 McDonald’s workers from across the country because we engaged in a peaceful, nonviolent act of civil disobedience.

“I was arrested because I want McDonald’s workers to know that 2.1 million members of SEIU — home care workers, child care workers, adjunct professors, security officers, hospital workers and many others — proudly stand with them.

“We came to McDonald’s world headquarters because this is where the real decisions are made. It’s time for the McDonald’s corporation to stop hiding behind its franchisees and to stop pretending that it can’t boost pay for the people who make and serve their food. It’s time for this company to stop systematically stealing its employees’ wages. McDonald’s is the world’s second largest private sector employer. It is extraordinarily profitable. It has an obligation to pay the people who run its stores enough to afford their basic needs.

“Members from across our union tell me over and over that they fully support fast food workers’ call for a $15 wage floor and their right to form a union without retaliation. When these workers win, they will boost their families’ purchasing power and that will strengthen the economy for all of us. They will show that workers can stick together and fight to make sure they are paid a fair share of the profits they create.”

The “Fight For Fifteen” Spurs Protests Around The World

Fabrizio Costantini for The New York Times

photoYesterday hundreds of workers across the country walked off the jobs in protest, demanding higher wages from their multi-billion dollar restaurant employers.

Workers from McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy’s, KFC and other restaurants participated in a national day of action calling for a $15 wage and the ability to form and join unions.

The USA Today posted a great article highlighting some of the events across the country.

“At the end of the day, there is more than enough money to pay these workers $15 an hour,” says Kendall Fells, 34, the leader of Fast Food Forward, who marched with the protesters in New York.”

McDonalds workers in Orlando were treated to a refreshing shower when the McDonalds management turned on their laws sprinklers.

In an ironic twist, McDonalds violated local water ordnances when they turned the sprinklers on the protesters.

(See an additional image on Instagram of what appears to be the manager turning on the sprinkler)

“Working families everywhere are inspired by the spirit and the courage of fast food workers who are striking today in over 150 cities,” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka.  “Every worker deserves fair wages and the right to form a union without retaliation because no one who works full time should struggle to support their family. That’s why the ‘Fight for Fifteen’ movement is growing bigger and protests are happening across America and six different continents. The message is clear: corporations should pay their employees fair wages and Congress should act so no one gets left behind. Only then will we have an economy that works for all working people.”

In a show of solidarity, workers around the world went of strike with US workers.

The USA Today reports:

“In Europe, Lorenz Keller, who works for the Swiss trade union Unia, said that union members were protesting at several McDonald’s stores in Zurich and planned actions in Geneva.

Banner-waving activists in New Zealand were the first to hit the streets on Thursday, at a McDonald’s in Auckland.

In the Philippines, young protesters held a singing and dancing flash mob inside a McDonald’s on Manila’s Quezon Avenue during the morning rush-hour.

In South Korea, activists gathered outside a McDonald’s in Seoul, including one protester dressed as Ronald McDonald.

In Japan, co-organizer Manabu Natori, who tried but failed to find a Ronald costume in time, was encouraged by the public response to the minimum-wage protest outside a downtown Tokyo McDonald’s.”

Fast Food Forward organized the worldwide walkout in conjunction with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU).  After the protests SEIU President Mary Kay Henry released the following statement:

Fabrizio Costantini for The New York Times

Fabrizio Costantini for The New York Times

“The fast food worker movement is a story about hope. It gets bigger as each month goes by because a growing number of Americans are worried about finding jobs that pay enough to live on.

“Americans know that it’s wrong that so many families have no financial security, no matter how hard they work. 

“Americans know that inequality is destabilizing the economy. Communities are out of balance because of the falling wage floor.

“These workers are fighting for $15 per hour because that’s a wage that will allow them to cover their basic needs and help lift our entire economy. By putting more money into the pockets of workers in fast-growing service sector jobs, we can get our economy moving again and rebuild the middle class.

“The movement continues to gain support and these workers are determined to fight for a better life and to stick together in a union. We are all better off when people whose work makes their companies profitable share in the success their work creates.”

Arbitrator Orders State to Make Workers Whole

SEIU 1984 Logo

Justice for state employees – hundreds of workers will finally be compensated 

Concord, NH, March 18, 2014 – Yesterday, an independent arbitrator ruled in favor of more than 1,000 NH state employees in a key victory that reversed a unilateral change the state made to lower employee pay.  The decision directed the state to make the affected employees whole with back pay. The ruling corrects a violation of state law and the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the State and the Executive Branch workers represented by SEA/SEIU Local 1984.

The dispute began in August of 2012, when Matthew Newland, Manager of Employee Relations and a Governor John Lynch appointee, issued a memo to state human resource and payroll representatives rescinding a long standing practice related to shift differential payments that apply to more than 1,000 state workers.

State agencies with continuous operations face the challenge of recruiting and staffing employees to work beyond standard day shifts. An effective practice used by many employers to meet this challenge, including the State, is to adjust employees’ hourly pay. There are many state functions that require round the clock staffing, such as correctional law enforcement, emergency services, and providing direct care in health facilities, including New Hampshire Hospital and Veterans’ Homes.

After the state stalled for months a resolution that could come from less formal remedies, SEA/SEIU Local 1984 filed an Unfair Labor Practice petition with the Public Employees Labor Relations Board (PELRB), and then a subsequent ULP after the state further stalled progress.  Ultimately, the PELRB ordered the parties to go to arbitration and the state finally abided. After more than a year of wrangling, the arbitration took place in January of this year.

In yesterday’s decision, the arbitrator found the practice of paying shift differential was established through a state memo issued in 1989, and there was no evidence that the practice had been rescinded since. The practice had been in place and “occurred with such regularity and frequency that employees could reasonably expect the practice to continue on a regular or consistent basis.” Therefore, the practice could not be rescinded through a memo; the differential pay is subject to collective bargaining.

During the arbitration, the state asserted that ordering payment of the back shift differential pay would require a legislative appropriation and thus the arbitration decision would be advisory only. The arbitrator, however, addressed this in the decision saying that funds to cover shift differential came from the agency’s overtime budget. “When overtime accounts were deficient, the agencies reallocated funds to ensure that employees were paid their respective wages, including overtime pay and shift differentials….The agencies certainly have the discretion to reallocate resources and funds to comply with the make whole remedy in this Decision.”

“Making the affected employees whole was the desired outcome,” said Diana Lacey, President of SEA/SEIU Local 1984.  “For affected workers paying rent, buying food and heating their home is more challenging now than ever.  These employees work hard providing critical services such as caring for veterans, the elderly and the mentally ill; watching over prisoners and responding to emergencies. It is only fair that they be compensated for their time,” she said.  “This situation began under the Lynch administration. Governor Hassan inherited it. We hope she will fully uphold the arbitrator’s decision and make sure the funds are available to truly make the workers whole.”

The application of the shift differential payments has not been consistent in the various facilities; as each facility has unique practices and needs.  Each facility had handled its own payroll processing and there were provisions in each process to accommodate the shift differential payments.

In 2012, the state rolled out an off the shelf software product to consolidate payroll and leave accrual processing.  During arbitration, Newland acknowledged that the new computerized payroll system was incapable of processing the various benefits and payments for all agencies in a consistent manner. It was far easier to simply end the practice of paying shift differential than to admit the costly software was not compatible with the state’s payroll needs.

In his decision, the arbitrator wrote that “the fact that determining the overtime rates is complicated does not justify the unilateral elimination of the payment of shift differentials to employees” and “moving to a new computerized payroll process does not authorize the state to have unilaterally eliminated a two decade long practice of paying shift differentials.

Philadelphia Low Wage and Fast Food Workers Hungry for a $15 Minimum Wage

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Guest Column by Sean Kitchen of the Raging Chicken Press (PA)

The low-wage worker campaign that has swept across the country since November 2012 is primed to make its Philadelphia debut.  The Fight for 15 movement began in November 2012 when 200 fast food restaurant workers across New York City went on a one day strike for the living wage of fifteen an hour.  Since then, the movement has spread to hundreds of cities across the United Stateschanged the national conversation on increasing the minimum wage and had a number of political victories.  In Philadelphia, a coalition is forming between the Service International Employees Union and local grassroots organizations and the Socialist Alternative, who had a successful minimum wage campaign in Seattle, Washington.

I Support Fight for 15 The labor coalition met in Northeast Philadelphia on Friday February 21 to discuss strategy and tactics and to fight for reforms to the the Commonwealth’s minimum wage and tipped minimum wage laws and several other policies affecting low wage workers. One person in attendance was State Senator and 13th District candidate Daylin Leach.  In an email exchange with the House candidate, Leach described the minimum wage fights as “among our most noble fights” and that “every worker has a right to expect, and to fight for, a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work, and a wage that enables people who work hard full time not to live in poverty.”  Senator Leach believes that $10.10 is too low and supports a minimum wage of $12.00, pegged to inflation, because it “would lift people above the poverty level.”  One of the biggest issues Leach has is with the tipped minimum wage.  He stated:

The tipped minimum wage is one of the most evil policies on the books at either the state or federal level, and we must address it at any and every level we can. At the federal level, the $2.13 tipped minimum wage has not been raised in 23 years. Many workers make far less than minimum wage on average, but their employers report them at minimum wage so the poorest workers pay taxes on money they aren’t even seeing.
Plus, employers are allowed to use tipped workers for non-tippable purposes (for example, cleaning out the freezer) for 20% of the work day. In other words, they get to pay their workers $2.13 for work they will never see a tip for.

On Saturday, February 15, the Philadelphia branch of Socialist Alternativeheld a meeting with speakers from New York and Boston and over 40 low wage workers from the Philadelphia area.  This effort is part of a nationwide effort by Socialist Alternative.  The organization had  major victories in Seattle last fall with their 15 Now campaign by electing socialist candidate Kshama Sawant to city council and forcing the Seattle mayor to take action on the issue.  Since being sworn in, Sawant has taken a hardline stance on “McPoverty Wages.” Justin Harrison, a union worker and Socialist Alternative member, stated “Philadelphia is one of the poorest major American cities, but our society has the resources to easily provide every worker a decent living. In Seattle, $15/hr is not a marginal issue anymore; it’s central to the city’s political debates. Today we join workers across the country to bring that fight to Philadelphia.”  Their first Philadelphia actions will be held March 8th and May 1st.

In November 2012, a couple hundred fast food and low wage workers launched a movement that flies in the face of the conventional wisdom surrounding our minimum wage laws.  The Fight for $15 is probably one of the most radical ideas to come out of the labor movement in decades and it has already changed the minimum wage debate.  The Fight for $15 forced the president to support a $10.10 federal  minimum wage, while others in Congress want a higher minimum wage, and has had victories in states and cities across the country.  In an age of social media and instant gratification, the resurgence of the progressive movement since  the Wisconsin Uprising and the formation and dismantling of Occupy Wall Street has scored major victories over the past three years.  It came out in full force when its backs were up against the wall in Madison, it unmasked the 1% and sparked a debate on income inequality and now it has put paid sick leave on the agenda and completely changed the way we think about the minimum wage.  The only remaining question is what comes next?

Photo credit Rising Tide.

Solidarity; Multiple Unions Join USPS Unions To Picket Congressman Issa At NH GOP Event

Issa Poster 1

Over 150 union workers stood out in below zero degree wind chill Monday night to deliver a message to Congressman Issa. He was the key-note speaker at a NH Republican fundraising dinner. The message delivered to Issa was the US Postal Service is not for sale.

Issa wants to dismantle a highly effective postal service. NALC President Fred Rolando reacted to last weeks announcement that the Postal Service made a $765 million operating profit in the first quarter of 2014 by urging Congress not to dismantle the service. “In light of these results, lawmakers should strengthen the postal network while addressing the remaining problem: the congressional mandate to pre-fund future retiree benefits, required of no other public or private entity in the country. Degrading the network and reducing services to the public and businesses would jeopardize the postal turnaround.”

Congressman Issa has other ideas. His 2013 Postal Reform Act HR 2748  will end Saturday Delivery and leaves open the possibility of reducing it further in 2018. Issa’s bill also opens the floodgates to contracting out postal jobs and services at an amazing pace. These actions will clearly accelerate the death spiral. The worlds best Postal Service will be dismantled so its remains can be carved up to be sold off to the highest bidder.

APWU President Mark Dimondstein called Mr Issa “a pure enemy of the Postal Service”.  Clearly Issa has a different agenda than ensuring the long time survival of the world’s best Postal Service. Issa, a long time champion of union busting and privatization, likely envisions the vast amount of money that can made by privatizing its services.

Dimondstein also referred to Issa and his postal proposals as “cynical and diabolical”. Those are also adept adjectives regarding the way Congressman Issa has become the richest member of congress. As documented by The New Yorker Congressman Issa has a dubious past regarding money-making ventures, often staying one step ahead of the law. Issa is going to have a much more difficult time at profiting off the sale of the Postal Service as the whole country will be victims to that crime.

Dismantling the Postal Service and crushing their unions would be a dream come true for Issa. This would allow him and his pro business cohorts to have even more leverage in their never-ending war on workers. It is quite apparent that the wealthy in this country will never say they are rich enough. Our income inequality has reached almost uncharted levels.

The rally against Issa on this cold windy night in New Hampshire was not about just Issa.   It was not about just the Postal Service. It really was about the continuing attack on workers in both the public sector and private sector.

The solidarity shown by seeing  Carpenters , Teachers, Metal Workers , Firefighters, Air Traffic Controllers and many others as they joined Postal Unions demonstrating in the cold was  quite impressive. The union solidarity as well as the chanting and singing gave all attendees a feeling of warmth in this particularly brutal winter.

The message to Issa and his anti union friends was clear. You are going to have a hell of a fight if you expect to defeat us!!