3-9-14 AFT-NH Legislative Update: Videotaping Public Officials, NHRS, Charter Schools, and Town Voting Information

AFT NH Legislative Update

“AFT-NH, dedicated professionals serving NH individuals and families through collaboration with others, striving to advance NH communities and improve the workplace with integrity and commitment.”

REPORT ON LAST WEEK’S FULL HOUSE VOTES

The full House overturned the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommendation on HB 1550, permitting the audio and video recording of a public official while in the course of his or her official duties by a vote of 88 to 200. The recommendation of Interim Study was passed, which means the bill is dead for at least the remainder of this legislative session.

AFT-NH requested that the Representatives considered the public employee when voting on this bill. All employees, both public and private, should have a reasonable understanding that when they are performing their jobs that they are not intimidated or harassed and should have a safe working environment. We want to thank all the representatives that supported employees in the state of New Hampshire.

The full House also defeated HB 1126, establishing a committee to study alternative public employee retirement plans.  There have been several committee / commissions that have studied this topic and at this time it is not needed.

Lastly, on a simple voice vote, the House defeated HB 1394-FN-A, relative to funds for chartered public school facilities and making an appropriation therefor.  AFT-NH supports this action, since it would not be fair to pass this bill when for the past 6 years there has not been any new money given to public schools for building aid.  Thank you to all the representatives that supported defeating these two bills.

UPCOMING HOUSE VOTES MARCH 12TH AND 13TH

The following bills are on the consent calendar, meaning they will likely go the way each committee recommends (unless a House member insists on a debate).  AFT-NH is in support of the committee recommendations and ask that representatives support these recommendations.

The House Education committee recommended Ought To Pass on HB 1128, establishing a committee to study issues related to students receiving special education services while attending a chartered public school. The duties of this committee would include studying responsibility for funding and provision of special education services, and any other issue deemed relevant by the committee.

Around 2011-2012 the state passed a bill which mandated that local districts must pay for support services for special education students enrolled in Charter schools. This means that a district must send someone to the charter school, contract out the service, or pay the Charter school to provide the services. All of which can add up to tens of thousands of dollars.

On another bill, the House Education committee recommended Inexpedient To Legislate HB 1180.  This bill increases the minimum number of days of school from 180 to 190 and authorizes up to 10 of those days to be completed online in a manner to be determined by the school board. We know that this bill is unnecessary because increasing the school year is something that can be done now if negotiated between the district and the union. If districts and the State want to improve education they can, as I have often stated, offer school employees appropriate and useful staff development opportunities, giving us the tools and materials to do the jobs and trust us as professionals.

THE FOLLOWING ARE ON THE REGULAR CALENDAR

AFT-NH is asking that representatives not support the House Education committee recommended Ought To Pass but instead, support the minority report of Inexpedient To Legislate on  HB 1392-FN-L, removing the restriction on the number of pupils eligible to transfer to a chartered public school. AFT-NH agrees with Representative Mel Myler:

The Minority was not convinced that the 10% restriction limiting students to transfer from a public school to a public charter school was warranted. There has been no past problem for any student wishing to attend a charter school. Furthermore, the unintended consequence could negatively impact the public school by depleting a grade level of attendance or curriculum options.

AFT-NH supports the House Education committee of Inexpedient To Legislative on HB 1393-FN-L, relative to tuition payments for students attending a chartered public school in the student’s district of residence.  AFT-NH believes that this bill is unnecessary. The state should not force or mandate an agreement onto the local district in regards to charter schools. If the local district wants to do this they can at the local level with the local citizens voting to approve or not.

AFT-NH agrees with the House Education committees’ recommendations of Inexpedient To Legislate on HB 1449, relative to the requirements for filing a charter school application. This is one law that moves to more transparency in how charter schools operate and making them directly and openly accountable to the public for student performance and their admissions and enrollment policies.  We need stronger policies mandating respect and support for teacher and staff voice in school policy and program, identification of potential conflicts of interest via disclosure requirements, and the use of public funds in the same rigorous manner required in our public schools.

The House Executive Departments and Administration Committee moved without recommendation on a 9-9 vote HB 1399 FN, relative to the application for a vested deferred retirement allowance in the retirement system.  Given the following facts, AFT-NH asks Representatives to support Inexpedient to Legislate because:

  • The term “vested” is currently in litigation. We must let the courts handle the outcome of this definition; and to manipulate it further would be unwise.
  • Before 2011, this is the only part of the RSA100-a statute that specifically mentions the term “vested.” Any change must be carefully examined, and given the status of the court cases, should be left alone at this time.
  • This bill was brought forward on behalf of the New Hampshire Retirement System as a house keeping bill—we believe that this is a policy change.

FULL SENATE VOTES ON THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014

AFT-NH supports the Senate Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommendation of Inexpedient to Legislate on SB 218-FN-L, relative to group I retirement system membership for all members hired on or after July 1, 2014. AFT-NH knows that if you close a group it would cost cities and towns millions of dollars.

AFT-NH does not support the Senate Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommendation of Inexpedient to Legislate on SB 364-FN, relative to group II service retirement allowances and relative to establishing a supplemental. We ask that the full Senate overturns this recommendation and put forth a recommendation of Ought To Pass for the following reasons:

  • SB 364 establishes real pension reform by creating a new hire benefit program that is responsible and follows a reasonable approach,
  • If we do nothing, New Hampshire is in a situation where 30 years down the road, we are going to have public employees – at the end of a career – eligible to apply for food stamps, and other social services. This puts a strain on working families by forcing our public employees into social services. This is financially irresponsible for New Hampshire and undignified for our public employees.
  • New Hampshire has enough trouble recruiting young and talented employees into our workforce – who would sign on to a career in public service, making typically lower salaries than counterparts in the private sector, and not even have retirement security to rely on?
  • Since the changes made in 2011, our new hires have been stripped of any hope for COLAs or medical insurance subsidies. With such a reduced benefit being offered, the employers are paying next to nothing.
  • SB 364 adds in a supplemental savings plan component to Group I members (teachers, support staff, state employees and municipal employees), which allows free market utilization and personal responsibility to prevent these employees from enrolling in social services.
  • We all share the goals of lower taxes and fiscal responsibility, as tax-paying residents of New Hampshire ourselves.
  • We need a plan that is predictable for the employers, and provides a fair benefit that recognizes long-term public sector service.
  • Our state is stronger, and our economy more stable when all retirees have the ability to live independently – a benefit that we should all strive towards.

If you have any questions or concerns please email me at lhainey@aft-nh.org.
Thank you!

In Solidarity,
Laura Hainey

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Late breaking news appears on our web site and on Facebook!
COMMITTEE HEARINGS WEEK OF MARCH 10, 2014

TOWN MEETING ALERT—Voting information

MONDAY, MARCH 10

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ADMINISTRATION, Room 306, LOB
11:00 a.m. Subcommittee work session on HB 1130-FN-L, relative to the Northeastern Interstate Forest Fire Protection Compact.

FINANCE – (DIVISION III), Rooms 210-211, LOB
1:00 p.m. Work session on SB 413, relative to access to health insurance coverage.

WAYS AND MEANS, Room 202, LOB
10:30 a.m. Rescheduled full committee work session on
HB 1415-FN, establishing a robotics education fund in the department of education,

TUESDAY, MARCH 11
VOTING INFORMATION

Farmington School District
Farmington School Custodians, AFT Local #6212
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #9 and #10.
Farmington Town Hall: 8:00am-7:00pm

Fremont School District  
Ellis School Support Staff, AFT #6233
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #4 and #5.
Ellis School: 7:00am to 8:00pm

Hudson School District
Hudson Teachers AFT #2263, Hudson PSRP’s, AFT#6245, and
Hudson School Secretaries, AFT Local #6260
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #2, #4 and #5.
Hudson Community Center:   7:00am – 8:00pm

Timberlane Regional School District  
Timberlane Support Staff Union, AFT #6530
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #6 and #7.
Atkinson:    Atkinson Community Center     7:00 am – 8:00 pm
Danville:    Danville Community Center     8:00 am – 7:00 pm
Plaistow:    Pollard School            7:00 am – 8:00 pm
Sandown:    Sandown Town Hall         8:00 am – 8:00 pm

Weare School District
Weare Educational Support Staff, AFT #6349
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #6 and #7.
Weare Middle School   7:00am to 7:00pm

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12
Henniker School District
Henniker Community School Support Staff, AFT #6314
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #6 and #7.
Henniker Community School     7:00pm

10:00a.m. House Session

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ADMINISTRATION, Room 306, LOB
12:00 p.m. or at lunch break from session Executive session on HB 1130-FN-L, relative to the Northeastern Interstate Forest Fire Protection Compact.

THURSDAY, MARCH 13
9:00 a.m. House in Session

10:00 a.m. Senate in Session

TUESDAY, MARCH 18
WAYS AND MEANS, Room 202, LOB
10:00 a.m. Executive session on
HB 1415-FN, establishing a robotics education fund in the department of education,

SATURDAY, MARCH 22
VOTING INFORMATION

Barnstead School District
Barnstead Educational Support Team, AFT #6332
Please vote YES on Warrant Articles #7 and #8.
Barnstead Elementary School       9:00am

The Smarter Balanced test makes good sense for New Hampshire

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The NECAP served its purpose

When the federal No Child Left Behind act required annual assessments of all public school students in grades 3-8 and 11, New Hampshire joined Rhode Island and Vermont – two other small states with small education budgets – to create the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP). It was a fill-in-the-bubble, multiple choice test first administered in 2005.  Since 2009, Maine has used the NECAP as well.

…but the new Smarter Balanced test is much better

Now New Hampshire is part of a much larger consortium of states – the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium – developing a modern test aligned to the new Common Core standards.  This computer adaptive test (it adjusts the student’s questions to the students abilities) is far better than the NECAP and was judged in a major study by the Michigan Department of Education to be the best in the country.  And, instead of testing our students in the fall and getting the results in April, when they are no longer relevant, the Smarter Balanced test will be given in the spring and the results will be available almost immediately.

So we are getting a far better test as the same price as the old NECAP.  New Hampshire teachers I have talked to have been very impressed with the new test and are looking forward to using it in their classrooms.

 

Some large Republican states are writing their own tests, but that kind of inside baseball does not matter to New Hampshire

Common Core opponents have made much of the fact that some large states have chosen to write their own Common Core tests rather than participate in Smarter Balanced or the other national testing consortium, PARCC.  When you look at the states involved, two things stand out.  Every one of them has a Republican governor and Republican-controlled legislature.  These folks are making a political statement, not an educational statement.  And they are all from large states that can afford the luxury of writing their own tests, the quality of which is yet to be determined.

The important thing is to use the test to improve instruction

And, of course, the new tests they are (talking about) writing are Common Core tests.  No state has dropped its commitment to the Common Core.  In fact, it looks as if the tide has turned in that debate.  Even Diane Ravitch, a critic of the Common Core, now says, “Those that like them should use them…Most objections to the standards are caused by the testing….Use them to enrich instruction, but not to standardize it.”

That’s just what New Hampshire does.  Testing is used here primarily to improve instruction and very little for accountability.  In fact, the New Hampshire agreement with the federal government is that neither the 2015 test or the 2016 test will be used for evaluating teachers – and even after that it will get minimal use for accountability.

The State has taken a lead role in developing the test and, in any case, would not have fiscal capacity to develop its own test as some large states are doing.  The inside baseball about which Republican states have switched to a different test vendor makes no real difference to New Hampshire.

Original Posted on ANHPE.org

James Milgram’s Dishonest Critique Of The Common Core Math Standards

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Most critiques of the Common Core don’t hold up to scrutiny. Dr. James Milgram’s critiques never do.  His criticism of the math standards is the basis for most of the rest of the math criticism you hear, but is fundamentally dishonest.

Milgram uses a willful misreading of the Common Core standards to say that California’s pre-Common Core standards for kindergarten math were better.  He claims that, in the Common Core standards, numbers are “nothing more than oral and reading vocabulary,” while the California standards pushed deep into the meaning of numbers.  Actually, the two standards are very similar – both good at guiding teachers to engender a deep sense of the real meaning of numbers.

And, since the California standards were actually so similar to the Common Core standards, Milgram manages to undercut claims that the Common Core math standards are not “developmentally appropriate” for kindergarteners  - a claim definitively put to rest by New Hampshire kindergarten teachers here.


The details

Common Core opponents frequently refer to James Milgram’s critique of the math standards to support their assertion that the standards are not rigorous enough – don’t prepare students for algebra in the 8th grade, etc. – even while complaining that the kindergarten math standards are too hard, “developmentally inappropriate.”

 

But the closer you look, the more confused this critique seems to be.  Jamie Gass of the Pioneer Institute referred me to this paper by Milgram and Sandra Stotsky as the foundation for this kind of critique.  Milgram, presumably, did the math sections and Stotsky the English sections.  But there are several problems with the math critique here.

First, Milgram seems to have started with the desired conclusion – “The Common Core is all wrong” – and worked backwards to create the evidence.  On page 4, he says,

California’s standards first focus on numbers as objects with special properties—they can be compared, they have magnitude, and they can be also be added and subtracted. But in Common Core’s standards, numbers are nothing more than oral and reading vocabulary in kindergarten.

Then, in the worst form of scholarship, he quotes selectively from the Common Core standards to make his point.  He says, correctly, that the first three Common Core standards are:

1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

3. Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).

Then, as you can see in the paper, he cites the California standards.  But, actually, the Common Core standards go on to say this:

4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.

5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.

6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.
7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

So, actually, the Common Core standards call for almost precisely the same approach to teaching numbers in kindergarten as California did in its widely respected standards.

This example illustrates the fundamental dishonesty of Milgram’s approach to critiquing the Common Core.  It gives advocates like the Pioneer Institute something to say when they travel the country railing against federalism, but it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

Beyond that, however, Milgram unwittingly undercuts the charge Common Core opponents make the that standards are not “developmentally appropriate.”  The only real difference between the California kindergarten math standards -widely regarded as “appropriate” and wise – and the Common Core is that the California standards had the kids counting to 30 (as New Hampshire and other states did) and now the goal is for students to count to 100, a goal that New Hampshire kindergarten teachers are finding entirely achievable.

 

From ANHPE post. 

AFT-NH Takes Pledge To Reclaim The Promise Of Public Education

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AFT-NH Board of Directors took the pledge to
RECLAIM THE PROMISE OF PUBLIC EDUCATION

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Public education is under assault, and decades of top-down edicts, mass school closures, privatization, and test fixation with sanctions instead of support haven’t moved the needle in the right direction.

It’s time to reclaim the promise of public education—not as it is today or as it was in the past, but as it can be—to fulfill our collective obligation to help all children succeed. Together, we will ensure that all children have the opportunity to dream their dreams and achieve them. We will put the public back into public education. We will help our public schools become centers of their communities, secure a voice and respect for those closest to the classroom, and fulfill public education’s purpose as a propeller of our economy, an anchor of democracy and a gateway to racial, social and economic justice.

The AFT-NH Board of Directors asks that you take the pledge with us and Reclaim the Promise of Public Education.

Lastly, please pass this along to your co-workers, family members and friends. Post it on your Facebook page and send it out on your twitter account. We must spread the word that it is time to Reclaim the Promise of Public Education.

If you have any questions I can be reached at 603-661-7293 or at lhainey@aft-nh.org.

In Solidarity,
Laura Hainey
AFT-NH President

Two Big Wins For Common Core In NH; An Update From Bill Duncan (@ANHPE)

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Yesterday afternoon the BIA gave the Common Core State Standards a ringing endorsement - announcing unanimous board support.  BIA President Jim Roche, said,

“A robust advanced manufacturing and high technology sector is critical to New Hampshire’s future economic success.  BIA believes the Common Core is an important part of ensuring our future workforce has the education and skills necessary to fill these high-paying, challenging jobs.”

The New Hampshire Business and Industry Association, New Hampshire’s state-wide chamber of commerce, is the headquarters for the State’s business community.  So this could be just the beginning of business support for the State’s education strategy.

And then the Manchester Board of City Schools met last night.  The new state educational standards, based on the Common Core State Standards, were at the top of the agenda.

Even without district leadership in implementing the new standards over the last years, individual schools and teachers have rolled out new lesson plans based the standards and begun seeing the results in their classrooms.  Nonetheless, Common Core opponents have flooded Manchester – testifying at meetings, leafletting door-to-door – looking for a high profile rejection of the Common Core in the State’s largest school district.

It was teed up for a vote last night.  And vote they did.

Everyone in the room at the Manchester Board of City Schools meeting last night seemed to know what had just happened – except the Union Leader with its headline trumpeting a Common Core defeat.  Actually, the board’s 13-1 vote for a face saving resolution represented  unanimous in support of the Common Core.  Here’s how they did it.

The board voted to support the proposal of Manchester’s new Superintendent, Dr. Debra Livingston, to create “Manchester Academic Standards” with Common Core State Standards as a “floor.”  Administrators would have the ability to enhance the standards as much as they want.  The only “dissenting” vote was from Chris Stewart who said the resolution was not the pure common core support that he wanted.  That made the it unanimous – Mr. Stewart for an in-your-face Common Core win and the rest of the board for a resolution that will allow Manchester’s teachers and administrators to move forward under the new standards without forcing Mayor Gatsas and others to face a contentious election season vote.

This was just the kind of direction Manchester super-teacher Selma Naccach-Hoff was calling for from her district leadership.

The board put off for another day the discussion of whether the district would also create its own annual assessment to substitute for the Smarter Balanced assessment that every other district in the State will use.  In the meantime, board members opposing the Common Core satisfied themselves that their vote would preserve “local control” while Common Core supporters understood that local control is the foundation of the State’s Common Core strategy which calls for each district to create it’s own curriculum and lesson plans – and any desired enhancements to the standards.

The Mayor of the city that does not have the funds to staff its classrooms and relies heavily on state and federal money to educate its children said that, in going its own way, Manchester would provide a model for the State.

That could be true.  The resolution Manchester Board of City Schools passed last night could indeed serve as a model for any district wanting to diffuse Common Core controversy locally: just resolve to make its own standard  - with the Common Core as the “floor.”

According to our teachers, the Common Core Standards are already a success in NH

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Posted by Bill Duncan of ANHPE

Legislators and school boards are hearing from advocates wanting to roll back the new Common Core State Standards. Fortunately, while this political push has been building, New Hampshire educators have been gaining experience with the new standards.  And among educators who have actually implemented the standards, there appears to be almost universal support.  Here is some of what they say:

New Franklin School (K-5), Portsmouth

Asked how it feels to be moving toward Common Core standards,  Angela Manning said,

It’s overwhelming, of course, because it’s a big shift” she said matter-of-factly.  ”It’s been interesting, though, to watch the kids step up to the level of deeper thinking that we’re asking them to do.  We’ve done persuasive writing in the past but this is the first time it’s been research based.  

In this particular project, we started with debating, on two different teams.  After that it just progressed.  I didn’t have to say, ‘Now let’s do a research-based writing project.’  The kids said, ‘Let’s research something,’ and decided on ‘Do fast food restaurants cause obesity?’  They’re writing this essay together as teams.  The next one they’ll do alone.

….Our teachers are saying, “Ok. This is a standard that we have to teach and we’re going to make it applicable to our students so it’s meaningful. How can we make it best for kids’ learning? The bigger things that are coming out of Common Core are that the thinking required will benefit these kids.

Bakersville Elementary (K-5), Manchester

Principal Judy Adams says,

Common Core will be challenging because of the depth of understanding required – especially for children who are language deficient – the ability to explain and show evidence of your thinking and be able to go to the argument level with something.  It’s much deeper than what we’ve done in the past.

White Mountains Regional School District, Whitefield

Superintendent Harry Fensom:

Educators see the value in the Common Core.  It’s going to close the gap [between slower and faster learners].  It’s going to reduce the need for remediation.  It’s going to make kids better prepared for college.

Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction, Melissa Keenan:

“Our teachers are now fully implementing the Common Core.  We’ll be fully implemented this year.  We’re ahead of schedule.  And the teachers are loving it.  We’ve developed standards based report cards.  We’ve developed some common assessments.  We’re working in increments across the grade levels.  We’re really pushing teachers to get to know those standards, to identify which ones they don’t understand.

We also have math and reading specialists who work with our teachers on a weekly basis to help them work through the standards and understand them better.

Teacher Coach:

Are the standards high?  Absolutely.  But have we scaffholded it so they can get here and have we had our expectations raised to meet that standard?  Yes.  And they’re doing it.

We raised the teachers’ expectations first and let them know what’s coming and then you can move on to raising the kids expectations.  The teachers say, “This is what we’ve gotta do, so let’s get them there.”  For veteran teachers, this is a no-brainer.  They are the most willing to say this [implementing the Common Core] is possible.

Many of our math teachers, when they first looked at the standards, they were scared and skeptical about their ability to meet those standards.  But then the realized that a hands-on approach might make those students learn quicker than an academic approach.  I’ve seen them having children experience the math with hands-on things as opposed to, “here are some equations you need to learn.” They’re saying, “We need to be sure we’re providing enough experiences to kids so that they’re internalizing these things.”  They are modifying their instructional practices to meet the standards.  So I do seem them working hard at that.

We can have lessons.  We can have activities.  But let’s make sure that they’re tied to the standard.  What is your goal for that activity and does it tie to what the standard is.

Melissa Keenan again:

The Common Core advocates for a much more integrated view of learning.  In order to get a handle on the Common Core, we had to start at a literal level.  What are the bits of knowledge that we wanted the kids to learn and teachers had to wrap their heads around that.  And now that they’re doing that, they’re beginning to see, “Oh, I can teach a text of this genre and be writing about it and addressing multiple standards at the same time.

From the Portsmouth Herald:

Mary Lyons, assistant superintendent of SAU 50, the district covering Rye, Greenland, Newington and New Castle, said any criticism of the Common Core she has seen from the public is due a lack of understanding or the spread of misinformation. Teachers will still have the autonomy to be creative when it comes to running their classrooms and won’t be constrained by the standards, she said.

“It’s not like it’s a new idea to be responsible for standards,” she said.

….

Portsmouth Middle School English teacher Melissa Provost said she worries the emphasis will come at the expense of classic literature.

“The Common Core has forced me to rethink my curriculum lessons while maintaining a grasp on my personal reasons for teaching this subject matter — to inspire students to become lifelong readers, writers and thinkers,” she said.

…..

Provost said it takes time to inspire middle schoolers and immerse them in a novel, and she often reads books aloud, asking students to make connections to the text, problem solve, take notes and write across different genres.

“Most importantly, I dramatize while modeling the craft of reading and they listen and learn,” she said. “My job is to open their minds via reading and writing. I’m not insinuating Common Core does not support this, but with the push for us to focus 70 percent of our studies (across the grade) on informational text, it greatly reduces the amount of time I have to let creativity and inspiration happen organically.”

Portsmouth Middle School math teacher Christine Kwesell had a different perspective. She said she is excited that the Common Core is striving to build deeper meaning when it comes to math concepts. She said the shifts have already been happening, but become more intentional with the implementation of the standards.

“There’s a model for excellent teaching. The Common Core supports that model,” she said. “It changes what we do in the classrooms with the kids, in a good way.”

 ….

“It’s definitely a difference. I think the difference really is around, in many cases, shifting some content from one grade level to another,” said Portsmouth Assistant Superintendent Steve Zadravec.

 …

The adage among educators is that lesson plans used to be “a mile wide and an inch deep,” covering many topics but lacking the depth for students to achieve true mastery of the concepts.

Lyons said the Common Core establishes high standards, but focuses on a smaller number of standards to encourage a greater depth of learning.

“The standards are very clear (compared to the old standards),” she said. “I feel that our teachers are happy with that. They find them easier to read and understand. … We’re excited about the challenge.”

 ….

The standards are promoting a transition from the “sage on the stage” who lectures students from the front of the classroom to the “coach on the side” who works with students on strategies to meet the challenge ahead, Hopkins said.

“What I see it doing is refining us,” she said. “Good teaching always asks kids to think on their own. This moves us one step closer to shooting toward that goal. I see it as a positive thing.”

The Exchange on NHPR

Nicole Heimarck:

[Common Core] is about more rigor – more rigor…in what students need to know and, equally important, its about rigor in what students can do, skills.  So we have spent a lot of time in our district discussing “habits of mind”…the notion of students being able to persevere, whether it’s in mathematics or reading – is very significant in these standards and its significant in our culture, in our communities….One of the big shifts we’re finding is that instead of students doing 35 or 40 math problems, they’re digging deep into one or two math problems – and challenging problems, problems that require them to think critically, to come up with multiple solutions…You need to have high expectations…and students feel a great deal of success when they recognize that they have accomplished something truly difficult.

Debra Armsfield:

We’re spending a great deal of time on creating teacher capacity, because there are great differences in what we’re asking teachers to do now.

We anticipate that there will be a period in which we won’t be able to meet [the standards] necessarily, right out of the gate, but I think if you get the ultimate goal, which is college and career readiness, when we look ahead at what this might look like 5, 6,7 years down the road, it will be worth it in the end and I think that’s the general consensus from folks.

How big a change is the Common Core?

It’s a complete overhaul.  The way we’re doing business is very different.  There are others things in our State that are linked…We are looking at teachers setting student learning objectives…the way we’re looking at assessments and shifting into standards-based assessments…so there’s an awful lot that’s inherent in some of these shifts.

For a 3rd grade student, one of the things that you’re going to note would be a greater focus on math fluency and “habits of mind” and just thinking about mathematics…You’re going to see a greater emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving…You’ll see fewer concepts but taught as greater depth and higher levels of understanding…

You’re not going to leave anything by the wayside but you’re going shift the point at which things are introduced…the “progression of learning”…when is it most appropriate for certain concepts to be introduced…If we know that we want students entering algebra, what are the skills that students need to acquire?  And then [the standards] have just shifted where those skills are acquired.

What do you mean by “habits of mind?”

When we refer to habits of mind, we’re talking about how students think and problem solve.  We’re talking about a variety of things – how they communicate their thinking…understanding as a human being what your process is, as opposed to that rote learning and memorization.

Amy Parsons (5th grade teacher):

How far along are you in teaching the Common Core?

Our kids at the 5th grade level are feeling very comfortable with the language of the Common Core.  Our district has been working toward full implementation this year….The teachers have had a lot of professional development and experience in using them. 

I really am enjoying the Common Core in the fact that I can integrate especially the language arts piece of it across my content areas…I have the benefit of being able to look at a lot of that nonfiction during my social studies time…and I think it lends itself really nicely to integration with science and social studies.

 

Vouchers Are A Failed Experiment And Must End – From Bill Duncan @ANHPE

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Here is Bill Duncan’s letter in today’s Portsmouth Herald, responding to a letter from a voucher supporter a few days ago.

Sept. 16 — To the Editor:

Arlene Quaratiello said in her angry defense of the voucher tax credit program (Sept. 16 letter), that I am responsible for the lack of public support. I would just point out that, 2-1, public school parents have opposed using state money to send children to private schools. That’s the real reason that, out of 1,000 scholarship applicants, so few came from public school families.

New Hampshire businesses never supported the program, either. They help New Hampshire’s public schools every day, but the Business and Industry Association took no position on vouchers, and businesses didn’t testify in support of the program. It is no surprise that they do not contribute now.

And there is no question that the Network for Educational Opportunity has violated the voucher law (details at www.anhpe.org), as program reports will make this clear at the end of the year.

But do you notice in Ms. Quaratiello’s letter how nothing is ever NEO’s fault? The lack of support from parents and business is my fault. It’s the state agency’s fault if NEO violated the law. Then, of course, NEO is burdened by the bad ruling from a “liberal judge” who read the N.H. Constitution pretty much as anyone would, as prohibiting funding of religious schools.

Actually, though, NEO’s numerous problems highlight how poorly written the law is. Virtually any nonprofit that applies is automatically approved as a scholarship organization after a couple of basic checks. And once a group is authorized, the law provides no way for the state to prevent it from misappropriating money or breaking program rules.

So, NEO, a group with no capacity to run this kind of publicly funded program, is a qualified scholarship organization, fully authorized to act independently. NEO’s errors will probably cost the state less than $50,000 this year because, fortunately, its program is so small. But a larger program operated the same way could cost the state millions in unbudgeted general fund dollars.

NEO has made so many mistakes that it may well not get authorized to participate next year, but that after-the-fact punishment is the only remedy available under this ill-conceived tax credit law.

The N.H. Supreme Court may well end the program (a ruling on the appeals may come by spring) but, one way or another, vouchers are a failed experiment that needs to be ended.

Bill Duncan

Advancing New Hampshire

Public Education

New Castle

via Vouchers are a failed experiment and must end | SeacoastOnline.com.

Thanks to New Hampshire’s teachers. You’re a precious asset to the State.

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Today I heard one teacher observing to another - not complaining, just observing - that “teacher appreciation days” in the local stores aren’t what they used to be.  There are 15% discounts for teachers buying supplies but not “composition books for a penny” as it used to be.

So this is teacher appreciation day here at ANHPE.  There’s no real purpose for this post other than to say thank you to New Hampshire teachers as you prepare for the new school year.  There’s a lot of debate swirling about schools and teachers and you could come to think that there are no teacher appreciation days anymore.  But New Hampshire does appreciate you and it’s a great place to do great teaching.

Teachers’ voices need to be part of the public debate about our schools.  You’ve got great stories to tell.  Your every-day work in overcoming learning challenges with your kids, implementing the Common Core, reaching out to parents, helping each other become better educators….this is all a view of our schools and teachers that most people don’t get.  And they need it.  They need to know how hard you work every day.

A long-time teacher and principal in Manchester said to me:

“People have no idea how much effort goes into these students.  And it’s because you want to do it.  I believe that the best that we can do for our students is to have them leave here so that they are able to handle sixth grade curriculum and then hopefully ninth grade curriculum because by the doing that we are giving them a choice. They may choose to go to a trade school, go to a college – or they may choose to go directly into the workplace. If we don’t do that for them – prepare them – we haven’t given them a choice.  What they choose to do beyond that is out of our control but the driving goal day-to-day is to get them there.”

People need to know that you are investing in their kids that way every day. We’ll try to tell more of those stories over the next while.

And, as you get down to business preparing for this school year, it’s worth looking at how your work in educating our kids every day fits into the national education reform debate raging today.

It’s hard to feel like society’s precious asset when you read the paper and watch the news.  It feels more like you’re on the front lines.  With rockets landing all around you.  Maybe you’ve got political advocates, parents and school board members telling you what you’re doing wrong.   Critics use everything from international comparisons to personal anecdotes to bash public education.

You see the national education reform debate and it looks like an existential threat to public education.  Louisiana, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan…Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Maine…200 years of public education is being plowed under.  And teachers are the targets.

You could be teaching in Maine, where the governor said, “If you want a good education, go to private schools. If you can’t afford it, tough luck. You can go to the public school.”

Or just look at Philadelphia.  It’s a school district about the size of all New Hampshire districts put together. And it represents the future of the education reform strategies we see in some states.  The State of Pennsylvania has defunded the Philadelphia school district and closed two dozen schools, so far, in order to hurt the teachers’ union. They have used their money instead to fund vouchers and charters, which now educate over 30% of the kids.

So now they’ve got 3 school systems to support – tradition public schools, charters and private schools – instead of just one.

Is that the future we have to look forward to?

But here’s something you might not know.

You are lucky to be teaching in New Hampshire.  You have an engaged and constructive union leadership, supportive political leadership, astute educational leadership … AND you have real local control.

New Hampshire is an island of sanity in the maelstrom of the national education reform debate.

This isn’t to say that everything is perfect.  It never is.  But just look at other states: charters, private school vouchers, A-F school scoring, punitive teacher evaluation driven by high stakes testing, draconian pay policies set at the state level – these are all used as bludgeons to beat on public schools and educators.

Obviously, this kind of reform strategy does not improve schools.  It merely penalizes schools with the most at-risk kids and, therefore, the lowest scores.  And it replaces public schools with a privatized form of education.

But in NH, just the opposite is happening.  Charters are under control.  Vouchers are just about extinguished.  We are moving in the opposite direction from A_F school ratings.  Evaluation of teaching and schools is about creating an environment that supports improvement.  And pay is still negotiated locally.

Here’s why I think that, in spite of the destruction you see going on around you, you’re in a great place that allows you to do great teaching.

Charters: Public charter schools are used throughout the country to undercut teachers’ unions. Cities like Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, DC, are shutting down traditional public schools and replacing them with charters.  And what’s the result?  There are good and bad charters as there are all other kinds of schools but over-all charters achieve no improvement in educational outcomes.

In New Hampshire, just over 1% of our kids go to charters and those schools are mostly targeted to special situations, particularly at-risk kids.  There’s wide consensus among the Governor, legislative committee chairs, unions and educators that charters in New Hampshire play a niche role.  They’re for special situations.

So far, then, charters play a small role in the New Hampshire education reform debate.  What about vouchers, the other major tool for reformers who want to privatize our public education system?

Vouchers: New Hampshire’s education tax credit bill was 2012 legislation that funds vouchers by granting tax credits to repay businesses almost dollar-for-dollar for donations to the voucher program.  The voucher bill was the most important piece of legislation passed last year.  The primary author in the House described his goal this way: “We want as many students as possible out of the “system”.  You are the “system” he was talking about.  This is hard to believe coming from a state representative - a member of the Education Committee no less!  But the bill passed over the governor’s veto.

But the program sends kids primarily to religious schools and a lower court here in New Hampshire has ruled that unconstitutional.  There’s now an injunction against using vouchers for religious schools.  That’s being appealed to our Supreme Court, of course, but in the meantime, neither public school parents nor businesses have shown much interest in vouchers.  They are happy with what you are doing for them.  The program will fund just 21 scholarships this year and, if it survives at all, will not become a significant factor in New Hampshire public education.

Evaluation: But what about the core issues of how teaching and schools are evaluated, the issue that’s most entwined with current federal education policy?

To my eye, New Hampshire got the best Race to the Top deal in the country.  Your commissioner’s negotiation of the No Child Left Behind waiver was a virtuoso performance.

This appeared to be a 10-month process that ended a few weeks ago, but the waiver was really the culmination of an effort that extended over several years.  It required a long-term vision by the department of education and the support of a bewildering number of players, including two governors, the Legislature, teachers, superintendents and school board leadership throughout the state.

But by 2010, the department had the groundwork laid for the move to Common Core State Standards that you are now implementing and for the new Smarter Balanced assessments.  And the new evaluation model, the product of two large task forces over 18 months, was done this spring.

So when it came down to negotiating with the U.S. Department of Education, the commissioner knew what she needed to get.  And she got it.  She got a waiver that did not sacrifice local control of our school systems to the federal government.  What did happen is that New Hampshire replaced No Child Left Behind with its own education strategy.

If we were in New Jersey or Indiana or Arkansas – or Maine – we’d be basing up to 50% of teacher evaluations on student test scores.  We’d be trying to embarrass schools with A-F ratings using loaded formulas.  And we’d be using all that to fire teachers, close schools and replace them with charters and vouchers.  Just like Philadelphia.

What do we have instead?  We certainly have no A-F school rating system.  Schools get an adequacy score constructed using realistic parameters.  It is not used to embarrass schools and make news.  And we get “priority” and “focus” schools, a new, regionally-based, system for working with schools that need help, either because they have low student achievement or some groups of students are falling behind.  They will get targeted support to make improvements that fit their realistic situations.

And we have an evaluation model that is our own and a model for the country.  DOE didn’t bring in “education reformer” Jeb Bush to tell us how to do it, as Maine did.  All over the country these documents are being created as political statements.  But the New Hampshire model is all about the kids.

The task force minutes summarized what one leader said this way:

“….the district has to show evidence that the teacher was given the support necessary to be successful….Those are the kinds of policies that need to go into the contract ….If a district cannot submit evidence that they provided support to a teacher that is having difficulty, then whose responsibility is it? We have to provide a level of protection for teachers that are giving it their best. Other states…are putting policies in place with no interaction from the educators. We do not want that to happen to us.”

That was the commissioner, not a union president.

And, because she had developed a broad consensus on a balanced plan, what she came out with from the waiver negotiation was pretty close to what she went in with.

You will see this supportive approach in your own district teaching evaluation plans.  But it would not have been possible without the flexibility provided by the New Hampshire waiver.

There’s a lot left to do.  There always is.  You will continue rolling out the Common Core standards.  And you’ll continue to hear debate about that.  But I think we see at this point that teachers who have implemented the Common Core standards become strong supporters.

A 5th grade teacher at Portsmouth’s New Franklin Elementary School, talking about the Language Arts standards, said to me:

“It’s overwhelming, of course, because it’s a big shift,” she said matter-of-factly.  ”It’s been interesting, though, to watch the kids step up to the level of deeper thinking that we’re asking them to do.  We’ve done persuasive writing in the past but this is the first time it’s been research based.

“In this particular project, we started with debating, on two different teams.  After that it just progressed.  I didn’t have to say, ‘Now let’s do a research-based writing project.’  The kids said, ‘Let’s research something,’ and decided on ‘Do fast food restaurants cause obesity?’  They’re writing this essay together as teams.  The next one they’ll do alone.”

So I look forward to this next school year with great anticipation – traveling further down New Hampshire’s own path for public education. I hope you’re excited too.  You are ground zero for showing what our American public schools can do in a constructive, supportive atmosphere.

And thank you for what you do.

Cross posted from ANHPE

5-19-13 AFT-NH Legislative Update From Pres. Laura Hainey

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UPCOMING FULL SENATE VOTES MAY 23rd

The following bills will be voted upon this coming week:

The Senate Executive Departments and Administration committee recommends passage of HB 124, relative to the determination of gainful occupation for a group II member receiving an accidental disability retirement allowance from the retirement system.  This recommendation came on a 3-2 vote in committee, and AFT-NH is in support of this recommendation and asks that the full Senate support the committee’s recommendation. This bill does the following:

I. Reinserts a provision which removes the application of the gainful occupation reductions to retirement allowances of group II accidental disability beneficiaries who have years of service plus years of accidental disability retirement which total at least 20 and who have attained the age of 45.
II. Allows the Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in the Department of Safety the option to rejoin the retirement system as a member and to continue group II retirement status based on prior service and group II membership, and allows the Assistant Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management to continue group II retirement status based on prior service and group II membership.
III. Provides for the appointment of the Director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management for terms of 3 years.

The Senate Executive Departments and Administration committee recommends passage as amended (by a 3-2 vote) of HB 342, relative to reporting of compensation paid to retired members of the retirement system.  The committee combined HB 364 into this bill. AFT-NH is in support of the recommendation.

Likewise, AFT-NH is in support of defeating HB 364 relative to notice required concerning employment of a retired member of the New Hampshire retirement for it was combined with HB 342.

The Senate Education committee made the recommendation of ought to pass on HB 260. This bill authorizes the Department of Health and Human Services to provide voluntary services to a child who would otherwise be found to be a child in need of services under RSA 169.  This bill would do the following:

I. Expands the definition of a child in need of services under RSA 169-D, revises circumstances under which the court may order various services or placements, and gives the department discretion to offer voluntary services.
II. Directs the Department of Health and Human Services to collect certain data regarding the CHINS program.
III. Provides for the suspension of voluntary services if appropriated funds will be insufficient to support voluntary services.
IV. Requires school board truancy policies to include certain information relative to student attendance.

AFT-NH is in support of the committee recommendation.

And lastly, we hope that the full Senate will finally vote on HB 187: relative to deliberative sessions in towns that have adopted official ballot voting. This bill was submitted by retired AFT-NH member Marjorie Porter. This bill provides that the dollar amount agreed to in a collective bargaining agreement between a public employer and an employee organization shall not be modified by the legislative body of the public employer and that amount is what the voters should vote on.

AFT-NH is in support of this bill and the committee’s recommendation of ought to pass; we believe that what is negotiated in good faith should go before the voters for a vote and not be sidelined by a few. We hope that the Senate will pass it as well.

FULL HOUSE VOTES ON MAY 22ND

AFT-NH supports the recommendation of defeat on SB 100, authorizing electronic payment of payroll.

AFT-NH member Rep. Douglas A Ley says it best:
“This bill authorizes employers to limit pay options to either direct deposit or issuance of digital payroll cards. It thereby reduces employee wage payment options, eliminating payment via a paper check. At present, nothing prevents employers from incentivizing payroll choice options and thereby encouraging employees to choose electronic methods over paper checks. Consequently, the majority prefer incentives and choice rather than mandate.

Finally, there were repeated concerns expressed before the committee regarding hidden and excessive fees tied to payroll card usage and the vulnerability of less digitally savvy groups to incur such fees imposed by “brand” cards such as Visa or MasterCard. As for small employers, their cost savings would likely be minimized with a changeover to payroll cards, as they will not be in as strong a position to negotiate lower costs with the companies issuing payroll cards. Therefore, on grounds of choice, incentive, and costs to employees, the majority supports ITL” (inexpedient to legislate—i.e., do not pass).

STATE BUDGET

The Senate will be holding executive sessions all week on HB 1: making appropriations for the expenses of certain departments of the State for fiscal years ending June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2015, and on HB 2: relative to state fees, funds, revenues, and expenditures. They have till June 6th to act on these two bills. AFT-NH will continue to monitor this as it works its way through the Senate and Committee of Conference.

To review all the documents that have been discussed click here.

If you have any questions or concerns please email me at lhainey@aft-nh.org.

In Solidarity,
Laura Hainey
AFT-NH President

UPCOMING HEARINGS FOR NEXT WEEK
Note the ones in
red are priority bills for AFT-NH

MONDAY, MAY 20

FINANCE, Room 103, SH
Sen. Morse (C), Sen. Forrester (VC), Sen. Bragdon, Sen. D’Allesandro, Sen. Larsen, Sen. Odell
10:00 a.m. EXECUTIVE SESSION ON PENDING LEGISLATION
TUESDAY, MAY 21

FINANCE, Room 103, SH
Sen. Morse (C), Sen. Forrester (VC), Sen. Bragdon, Sen. D’Allesandro, Sen. Larsen, Sen. Odell
10:00 a.m. EXECUTIVE SESSION ON PENDING LEGISLATION
EDUCATION, Room 207, LOB
10:00 a.m. Executive session on SB 27-FN, relative to monitoring by the Department of Education of programs for children with disabilities,
SB 48, relative to school performance and accountability and continued executives session and continued executive session on
SB 82, establishing a commission to identify strategies needed for developing and implementing a competency-based public education system,
SB 97, relative to high school equivalency and relative to illiteracy.

HEALTH, HUMAN SERVICES AND ELDERLY AFFAIRS, Room 205, LOB
10:00 a.m. Subcommittee work session on retained HB 494, relative to the administration of glucagon injections for pupils.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

10:00 a.m. House in session

FINANCE, Room 103, SH
Sen. Morse (C), Sen. Forrester (VC), Sen. Bragdon, Sen. D’Allesandro, Sen. Larsen, Sen. Odell
10:00 a.m. EXECUTIVE SESSION ON PENDING LEGISLATION


THURSDAY, MAY 23

10:00 a.m. Senate in session

FINANCE – (DIVISION III), Rooms 210-211, LOB
10:30 a.m. Public hearing on proposed amendment to SB 129-FN, relative to court-ordered placements in shelter care facilities and at the Sununu Youth Services Center, relative to the children in need of services (CHINS) program, and establishing a committee to study programs for children in need. The proposed amendment (2013-1655h) adds the House-passed language for the Children in Need of Services program as contained in HB 260 as amended by the House. Copies of the proposed amendment are available from the Sergeant-at-Arms office on the 3d floor of the State House.

FRIDAY, MAY 24

FINANCE, Room 103, SH
Sen. Morse (C), Sen. Forrester (VC), Sen. Bragdon, Sen. D’Allesandro, Sen. Larsen, Sen. Odell
9:00 a.m. EXECUTIVE SESSION ON PENDING LEGISLATION


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29

FINANCE, Rooms 210-211, LOB
10:00 a.m. Executive session on
SB 129-FN, relative to court-ordered placements in shelter care facilities and at the Sununu Youth Services Center, relative to the children in need of services (CHINS) program, and establishing a committee to study programs for children in need.

MONDAY, JUNE 3

TASK FORCE ON WORK AND FAMILY (RSA 276-B:1), Room 207, LOB
1:15 p.m. Regular meeting.

5-13-13 AFT-NH Legislative Update From Pres. Laura Hainey

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UPCOMING FULL HOUSE VOTES May 22nd

The House Labor Committee recommended defeating SB 100: AN ACT authorizing electronic payment of payroll. This bill will affect all public employees in New Hampshire. This bill will do the following:

  • Delete the requirement that an employer who pays wages by electronic fund transfer offer employees the option of being paid by check.
  • Permits an employer to pay wages with a payroll card after offering employees the option of being paid by direct deposit.

AFT-NH is opposed to this bill and supports the Committee recommendation to defeat this bill.  We understand that many employees do receive their paycheck by direct deposit but there are many who prefer the paper check and they should still have this option. It might be different if they were proposing the cost savings be shared with the employee.

UPCOMING FULL SENATE VOTES—DATE NOT YET SET

The Senate Executive Departments and Administration Committee recommended passage of HB 124 as amended: relative to the determination of gainful occupation for a group II member receiving an accidental disability retirement allowance from the retirement system.

This bill:
I. Reinserts a provision which removes the application of the gainful occupation reductions to retirement allowances of group II accidental disability beneficiaries who have years of service plus years of accidental disability retirement which total at least 20 and who have attained the age of 45.
II. Allows the director of homeland security and emergency management in the department of safety the option to rejoin the retirement system as a member and to continue group II retirement status based on prior service and group II membership, and allows the assistant director of homeland security and emergency management to continue group II retirement status based on prior service and group II membership.
III. Provides for the appointment of the director of the division of homeland security and emergency management for terms of 3 years.
AFT-NH supports the recommendation of passage.

AFT-NH BILL TRACKER UPDATE

Click here to review AFT-NH bill tracker and see where each bill is and where AFT-NH stands on each bill.

STATE BUDGET

The Senate held a public hearings on HB 1: making appropriations for the expenses of certain departments of the State for fiscal years ending June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2015, and on HB 2: relative to state fees, funds, revenues, and expenditures Thursday. Many who testified ask that they fund programs that are very much needed like the CHINs program, community health center, personal care attendant, community based program for adduction, and preventative care programs.

In the end Chairman Morse stated “in so many words” that the Senate budget will look a lot different and be a lot leaner than the House’s proposed budget. To review all the documents that have been discussed click here.

If you have any questions or concerns please email me at lhainey@aft-nh.org.

In Solidarity,
Laura Hainey
AFT-NH President

UPCOMING HEARINGS FOR NEXT WEEK
Note the ones in
red are priority bills for AFT-NH


MONDAY, MAY 13

STATEWIDE EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE (RSA 193-C:7), Room 103, LOB
10:00 a.m. Regular meeting.

TUESDAY, MAY 14

HEALTH, EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES, Room 103, LOB
9:00 a.m. EXECUTIVE SESSION ON PENDING LEGISLATION
10:00 a.m. Presentation: New Hampshire Public Charter School Association
Presentation: Department of Education

EDUCATION, Room 207, LOB
10:30 a.m. Subcommittee work session on retained HB 435-FN, relative to funding for chartered public school pupils, HB 243, relative to the board of trustees of a chartered public school, HB 424-FN, relative to review of chartered public school applications by the state Board of Education.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15

EDUCATION, Room 207, LOB
10:00 a.m. Subcommittee work session on SB 97, relative to high school equivalency and relative to illiteracy.
10:30 a.m. Subcommittee work session on SB 82, establishing a commission to identify strategies needed for developing and implementing a competency-based public education system.
11:00 a.m. Subcommittee work session on. SB 27-FN, relative to monitoring by the Department of Education of programs for children with disabilities.

FRIDAY, MAY 17

FINANCE, Room 103, SH
SENATE FINANCE BRIEFINGS
10:00 a.m. Department of Education

TUESDAY, MAY 21

EDUCATION, Room 207, LOB
10:00 a.m. Executive session on SB 27-FN, relative to monitoring by the Department of Education of programs for children with disabilities, SB 48, relative to school performance and accountability.

HEALTH, HUMAN SERVICES AND ELDERLY AFFAIRS, Room 205, LOB
10:00 a.m. Subcommittee work session on retained HB 494, relative to the administration of glucagon injections for pupils.

MONDAY, JUNE 3

TASK FORCE ON WORK AND FAMILY (RSA 276-B:1), Room 207, LOB
1:15 p.m. Regular meeting.