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Trump Hotel Workers Say Donald Can “Start Here” If He Wants To “Make America Great Again”

Trump: “Make America Great Again.”

Hotel Workers in Las Vegas: “Mr. Trump, Start Here.”

Trump Casino Las Vegas (FLICKR Jim G)

Trump Casino Las Vegas (FLICKR Jim G)

Las Vegas, NV – “Donald Trump says he wants to make America great again,’” said Geoconda Arguello-Kline, Secretary-Treasurer for the Culinary Union. “Mr. Trump should start right here in Las Vegas with workers at his hotel. Many of them are immigrants who work hard to provide for their families. They deserve equal treatment and should be respected for their contributions to this great city.”

On Friday, August 21, 2015 at 5 p.m., employees from Trump International Hotel Las Vegas will march from Las Vegas Boulevard to their hotel to demand equality. They will be joined by clergy leaders, community organizations, elected officials, and union workers throughout the city. Over 500 Trump Las Vegas employees are seeking to unionize so that they can have the American Dream and have a better life for themselves and their families.

“I came from Mexico many years ago and became an American citizen to have a better opportunity for me and my family,” said Maria Jaramillo, a housekeeper at the Trump Las Vegas. “This country is a nation of immigrants, and we all work hard and deserve to be treated fairly.”

“I was born in America, and, with my union job, I have the opportunity to provide for my family. That’s why I support Trump workers who want to unionize,” said Pamela Parre, a banquet server at the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino, an MGM Resorts International property in Las Vegas. “Mr. Trump can make America better by treating his employees with dignity and respect, and make their jobs great jobs just like mine.”

In June 2014, five Trump Las Vegas employees were unfairly suspended for exercising their legal right to wear a union button and organize their coworkers. After the Culinary Union filed unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) against the Trump Las Vegas, these workers were returned to work with back pay. In June 2015, the Culinary Union filed additional charges with the NLRB asserting that the Trump Las Vegas violated the federally protected rights of workers to participate in union activities. Some of the new charges include incidents of alleged physical assault, verbal abuse, intimidation, and threats by management.

The Culinary Union is the largest labor union as well as the largest immigrant organization in Nevada, representing hospitality workers who come from 167 countries and speak over 40 languages. The Culinary Union and the national organization UNITE HERE have long campaigned for immigration reform and the rights of immigrant workers, including the Immigrant Workers’ Freedom Ride in 2003, and continues the fight to achieve comprehensive, worker-centered immigration reform.

The Guardian US Writers Vote Overwhelmingly to Join The NewsGuild-CWA

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In 45 – 0 Vote, The Guardian US Staff Become Latest Digital Media Reporters to Unionize  

NEW YORK – Writers and staff members of The Guardian US announced today they have voted to join The NewsGuild-CWA in a 45-0 vote, held through an expedited election agreed to by The Guardian’s management and staff. The announcement is the latest in a series of organizing victories for digital news reporters. 

“This is a big day not only for the writers and staff members at The Guardian US but for the news industry as a whole. Digital media is growing up, and it’s time our digital reporters received the same benefits and protections as their print media colleagues,” said Bernard Lunzer, President of The NewsGuild-CWA.

“The News Media Guild is pleased that the editorial staff of The Guardian US chose our union to represent them,” said News Media Guild President Martha Waggoner, the TNG-CWA local where The Guardian US staffers will join. “The Guardian has a history of great reporting that continues today. It’s a publication with a grand tradition of unionism that now includes its U.S. writers.” 

The Guardian US writers and management released a joint statement announcing the vote to unionize:

We are proud to announce that the editorial staff of Guardian US have voted unanimously in favor of collective representation under the auspices of the News Media Guild, following a ballot which was conducted independently by the American Arbitration Association. The union has been voluntarily recognized by Guardian News & Media LLC following the result of that ballot.

We would like to thank the News Media Guild and the Communications  Workers of America for their invaluable help, advice and support. Furthermore, we greatly appreciate the support shown by our unionized editorial colleagues in the UK and Australia, where the Guardian has a strong history of working in partnership with its unions.

We are also grateful to the leadership shown by the Guardian US editor, Lee Glendinning, who immediately welcomed our initiative to seek collective representation. Our discussions with Guardian management have been conducted in a constructive manner and we’re confident we can all achieve our stated goal – a long-term, sustainable future for the Guardian and its quality journalism.

Guardian US is in the process of rapid growth, which has been reflected by increasing audience figures and groundbreaking journalism, from our Pulitzer prize-winning Edward Snowden disclosures to our current work highlighting police-related deaths through The Counted project. Together we look forward to continuing to enhance the Guardian’s reputation as one of the most read, most respected and most trusted news organizations in the US. 

-Guardian US-The News Media Guild

  

About The NewsGuild-CWA

The NewsGuild-CWA has represented digital workers for over 20 years, first as print and broadcast employers expanded online, and later in digital-only operations. Today, it represents over 2,000 digital workers. They range from staff members at The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Associated Press, Reuters, Boston.Com, SFGate and Philly.com to writers at The Daily Beast, Truthout and In these Times.

Union Is the New Black: Labor Organizing in Orange Is the New Black, And What It Means For You

union is the new black By  Leslie Tolf, President of Union Plus

In its third season with Netflix, Orange Is the New Black has had a significant effect on America’s consciousness regarding: race, women and incarceration, and transgender issues. This season highlighted many character backstories, but personally, the most interesting plot-line was that of the security guards and their efforts to organize a potential union. We see labor issues in popular culture and television on occasion, and this example in particular shines light on issues that that arise when workers don’t have labor protection.

In this instance, the security guards at Litchfield women’s prison were dealing with cut hours, a loss of benefits and job security, and how to protect themselves. The answer to that, in addition to having an ally in management, was to form a union.

We’re not often exposed to unionization in mainstream media, so I want to take the opportunity to explain the importance of unionizing and what it takes to get the protection you need when it comes to labor.

A Little Bit of History

During the 18th century and Industrial Revolution in Europe, the influx of new workers in the workplace warranted regulations and conversations around worker protection. In the US, the founding of the National Labor Union in 1886 – though not largely successful – paved the way for unions in the US. Labor protection brought us things we see as customary now, like: the weekend, minimum wage, or national holidays. Without unions, and despite our economy veering towards entrepreneurship and fewer professional boundaries, many of us would be in danger of job loss.

Think about what you see on OITNB, where the prisoners work without pay, are demeaned by the prison and are endangered at every moment. Now, imagine that was your job. Less than a century ago, Americans worked for poverty wages alongside their children in dangerous factories; the same factories where the bosses that degraded them also turned workers against other workers by exploiting racial and ethnic prejudices. Imagine that your death was just another cost of doing business, like the overhead and taxes.

This was America before the labor movement – before workers acted together to demand fair wages, safe workplaces and laws that reflected the values of the working class. Workers not only won things like the weekend, minimum wage and national holidays, but also the less-sexy (but equally important) rights to bargain collectively, to take collective action and to even just talk to your coworkers about your wages and working conditions. People died for these things. While we may live in a great democracy, it’s worth remembering that true progress is really made through the mobilization of people. After all, women didn’t get the right to vote by voting on it.

Should You Unionize?

For a long time, a powerful labor movement allowed all American workers the ability to share in economic prosperity and take advantage of what is now an anachronism: if you work harder, you’ll get more. Wages and productivity went hand in hand until the decline of union membership began to drop as a result of anti-union laws and well-funded corporate attack on organized labor. If the median household income had kept pace with the economy at a constant rate during the years of higher unionization, it would now be closer to $92,000 a year instead of just under $52,000. The fundamental purpose of a union is to balance the overwhelming power of the few people making huge gains in our economy.

Put another way: how many people can afford their own lobbyist to get a slice of that pie? That’s the big picture. The smaller picture is you and your job. You know how great the constitution is? Freedom of speech and assembly? The right to due process? Democracy? You can throw all that out when you enter the workplace. If you don’t have a union, you can be fired for any reason that’s not based on a relatively small list of protected classes. But let’s talk money: union members have wages that average 27 percent higher than their non-union counterparts, are more than 79 percent likely to have health benefits through their employers, and 60 percent more likely to have an employer-provided pension.

What it Takes to Build a Union

Solidarity. Practically speaking, it takes a small group of you and your co-workers who can first quietly assess how others in your workplace feel about their jobs. What matters most to you? Is it the low pay? The poor benefits? Safety? Lack of respect? Focusing on what really matters will be crucial to winning the right to collectively bargain. The labor union you contact will help shepherd you through the election process to a contract, but the most important thing that you and your coworkers can do is to educate yourselves and stick together. And always remember that the union is you and your co-workers, not the third-party intruder your bosses might suggest. It’s your union and you’re trying to fix issues that matter to you.

Why It’s Important

Despite common belief, unions aren’t just for factory workers and building trades, they’re for everyone who wants to make a better life for himself or herself and earn a fair wage for the work they do. When you have a union, hard work can once again equate to sharing in the benefits of your labor. Even a college degree hardly guarantees a good paying job like it once did; too many people with piled student loan debt have found themselves underpaid and struggling. At the end of the day, a union is about how you will provide for yourself and your family.

 

Follow Leslie Tolf on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ltolf

 

Worker Wins Update: From Night Shifts to Nightclubs, Workers See Big Wins in June

WASHINGTON, DC– Workers across the country have stood up in the past month to fight for better wages and working conditions.

NYC Musicians Win Major Bargaining Agreement with Historic Venue: This month, members of the Associated Musicians of Greater New York Local 802 (American Federation of Musicians) signed a collective bargaining agreement with 54 Below, attached to the legendary Studio 54 nightclub.

Virgin America Pilots Flying High with New Union: Earlier this month, pilots for Virgin America overwhelmingly voted to join the Air Line Pilots Association, International. The vote was a result of a year-long campaign initiated by the pilots looking to achieve a stronger voice in the workplace.

California LabCorp Workers Continue Big Organizing Wins: Following the success of a May organizing campaign, 40 new workers at LabCorp in Southern California joined UFCW Local 1428. The new members will join contract negotiations in July.

Telecom Workers Win Big With T-Mobile Scheduling Changes: T-Mobile employees won significant scheduling changes last month that gave workers more power over their own schedules and time-off without the threat of a negative review.

Domestic Workers Secure New Benefits, Rights in Two States: Earlier this month, Connecticut and Oregon agreed to establish new protections and benefits to domestic workers. Oregon’s legislation includes time off and overtime pay, while Connecticut’s would include domestic workers in the state’s anti-discrimination and harassment statutes.

Interns Break New Ground, Form New Union: Interns at the American Federation of Teachers formed the nation’s first non-medical intern union earlier this month, earning a pay raise and a greater voice in their workplace.

Grocery Workers Bag Up New Rights with Union: Workers at Food Front Co-op stores in Portland, Oregon overwhelmingly voted to join UFCW Local 555 earlier this month. The workers will begin negotiations with store management in the coming weeks.

Government Workers Earn Significant Raising Wages Victories: Last month, federal government employees in 13 cities won pay increases thanks to work by AFGE to bring federal salaries in line with local market conditions.

Contact: Anthony DeAngelo (202) 637-5018

 

Worker Wins Update: From the Newsroom to the Nail Salon, Workers Earn Huge Wins

WASHINGTON, DC– Workers across the country have stood up in the past month to fight for better wages and working conditions.

Gawker Writers Vote to Form Union: Today, more than 100 employees of Gawker Media joined the Writers Guild of America. Writers cited wages and ensuring a stronger voice in the workplace as a reason to unionize.

Cities and States Make Raising Wages Gains: As the ‘raising wages’ agenda takes hold nationwide, Californiaand Delawareboth took steps to raise their minimum wage. Meanwhile, proposals have been put forward in Tacoma, WA, St. Louis, MO, and Kansas City, MO, to raise their minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Georgetown University Workers Vote to Join UNITE HERE!: Last month, Aramark food and beverage workers at Georgetown University voted to join UNITE HERE! Local 23. The local of over 200 employees is currently fighting for improved health insurance, a 40-hour work week, and immigrant worker protections.

California Phlebotomists Vote to Join Union: Last month, phlebotomists (blood work technicians) at LabCorp in Southern California voted to join UFCW Locals 1167 and 1428, citing a need for better wages, working conditions, and safety measures.

New York Healthcare Workers Win Organizing Fight: Support workers at Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare have voted to join fellow healthcare workers as members of CWA Local 1126 late last month. The workers, including housekeepers and laundry staff, will join 12,000 healthcare workers represented by CWA in upstate New York.

Missouri Fire Fighters win Big with Union Vote: Last month, fire fighters and engineers in Branson, MO voted to have a voice in their workplace by joining IAFF Local 152. The first responders won in spite of an aggressive effort by local officials to prevent workers from organizing.

Michigan Workers Win New Contract, Wage Gains: Last month, slaughterhouse and meatpacking workers at UFCW Local 951 in Plainwell, MI ratified a new contact that includes significant wage gains, better access to healthcare, and greater overtime benefits.

NYC Manicurists Earn Critical Protections in Workplace: Last week, New York announced that nail salons are required to post a newly formed ‘manicurists’ bill of rights’, which describes wage information and other rights for workers. The announcement followed a recent report by the New York Times highlighting poor pay and working conditions in nail salons.

Oregon Hospital Workers Win Landmark Organizing Battle: Earlier this week, approximately 1,100 workers at Peacehealth’s Sacred Heart Medical Centers in Oregon voted to join a union. The staff, ranging from doctors and nurses to pharmacists and janitorial staff, cited working conditions and benefits as a reason to organize.

Worker Wins Organizing Update: Organizing Efforts Pay Off in Big Spring for Workers

Workers have stood up in the face of low wages and unacceptable conditions to organize new workplaces. Below are some recent major organizing wins:

Philadelphia Charter School Teachers Organize with AFT: Teachers and other staff members at Olney Charter High School voted to organize a union earlier this week, becoming the largest charter school in Philadelphia to organize. The teachers and staff will be represented by the Alliance of Charter School Employees, which is an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers.

UConn Graduate Teaching Assistants Win Big with First Contract: Last month, approximately 2,300 graduate teaching assistants reached a tentative agreement on a first contract with the University of Connecticut. The assistants, represented by the Graduate Employee Union, a branch of the United Auto Workers, ensured an increase in stipends, a break in university fees, and greater health benefits.
Big Easy Teachers Work Hard to Form Union: Last month, teachers belonging to the United Teachers of New Orleans, an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers, secured its first collective-bargaining contract in the past decade at Benjamin Franklin High School. The teachers began to organize in 2014, citing issues with pay inequality.

Sheet Metal Workers Hammer Out Major Victories Across the Country: Earlier this spring, transportation workers in South Florida voted overwhelmingly to join the Sheet Metal, Air, Rail, and Transportation (SMART) union. SMART workers have also organized in Buffalo, NY, and secured a major Project Labor Agreement in Long Beach, CA.

Aircraft Mechanics Flying High After Organizing Win: Over 100 aircraft mechanics and other technicians at the Beechcraft Service Center in Wichita, KS joined International Association of Machinists District 70 last month. IAM’s organizing efforts took off recently with several thousand workers organizing at Textron Aviation, which includes Cessna and Beechcraft aircraft.

DoubleTree Workers Outsmart Harvard Union Opposition: Thanks to a major organizing win last month, approximately 130 workers at the Hilton DoubleTree Suites Hotel in Cambridge, MA will become members of UNITE HERE! Local 26.  The hard-fought, two-year campaign was opposed by Hilton and Harvard University. The workers, many of them immigrant housekeepers, cited unfair hours and unsafe conditions as reasons for voting to form a union.

Union Brothers and Sisters Win in ‘City of Brotherly Love’: Workers for the Philadelphia-based manufacturing company Chemson voted to join ICWUC/UFCW after uniting over issues with poor pay and unfair hours. Workers also pointed to lack of respect on the job and unsafe working conditions as reasons to form a union.

Worker Wins Update: Workers Score Victories In Pay and Organizing, Help Others in Community

WASHINGTON, DC– Workers across the country have stood up in the past month to fight for better wages and working conditions.

LA City Council Approves Wage Win: The Los Angeles City Council approved a measure this week that would raise the citywide minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020, a raise from the current $9 minimum wage. Once implemented, LA will join cities such as Seattle and San Francisco in raising the minimum wage to $15.

DoubleTree Workers Outsmart Harvard Union Opposition: Thanks to a major organizing win last month, approximately 130 workers at the Hilton DoubleTree Suites Hotel in Cambridge, MA will become members of UNITE HERE! Local 26.  The hard-fought, two-year campaign was opposed by Hilton and Harvard University. The workers, many of them immigrant housekeepers, cited unfair hours and unsafe conditions as reasons for voting to form a union.

Union Brothers and Sisters Win in ‘City of Brotherly Love’: Workers for the Philadelphia-based manufacturing company Chemson voted to join ICWUC/UFCW after uniting over issues with poor pay and unfair hours. Workers also pointed to lack of respect on the job and unsafe working conditions as reasons to form a union.

Facebook ‘Shares’ Wealth, Workers Give Move a ‘Like’: Facebook announced earlier this month that it will require U.S. contractors and vendors to pay their employees at least $15 an hour and offer paid-time-off for sick days and vacation. The tech giant will also mandate that contractors take steps to ensure paid parental leave.

Workers Reach Out to Help Aspiring Americans Apply for Citizenship: Earlier this month, members of the Pennsylvania-based UFCW Local 1776 held an immigration workshop where trained members assisted aspiring Americans in filling out their applications to apply for citizenship. The workshop, part of UFCW’s Union Citizenship Action Network program, helped workers at local JBS and Cargill plants, and is part of a nationwide effort to help those seeking citizenship.

Big Easy Teachers Work Hard to Form Union: Last month, teachers belonging to the United Teachers of New Orleans, an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers, secured its first collective-bargaining contract in the past decade at Benjamin Franklin High School. The teachers began to organize in 2014, citing issues with pay inequality.

NYC Mayor de Blasio to Launch ‘Day-of-Action’ for Workers Following Report: NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that his office will launch a ‘day-of-action’ to address reports that workers in the nail salon industry are facing ‘deplorable conditions’ including unsafe workspaces and pay less than minimum wage.

Worker Wins Update: Workers Fly High, Win Big Through Major Organizing Efforts

Union-yesWASHINGTON, DC– Workers across the country have stood up in the past month to fight for better wages and working conditions.

Philadelphia Charter School Teachers Organize with AFT: Teachers and other staff members at Olney Charter High School voted to organize a union earlier this week, becoming the largest charter school in Philadelphia to organize. The teachers and staff will be represented by the Alliance of Charter School Employees, which is an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers.

Sheet Metal Workers Hammer Out Major Victories Across the Country: Earlier this spring, transportation workers in South Florida voted overwhelmingly to join the Sheet Metal, Air, Rail, and Transportation (SMART) union. SMART workers have also organized in Buffalo, NY, and secured a major Project Labor Agreement in Long Beach, CA.

Aircraft Mechanics Flying High After Organizing Win: Over 100 aircraft mechanics and other technicians at the Beechcraft Service Center in Wichita, KS joined International Association of Machinists District 70 last month. IAM’s organizing efforts took off recently with several thousand workers organizing at Textron Aviation, which includes Cessna and Beechcraft aircraft.

Ohio Nurse Wins Justice, $2 Million After She’s Targeted by Hospital: After suffering through a campaign of intimidation and abuse, Ann Wayt, a Cleveland-area nurse won a $2 million award against Affinity Medical Center after their attempts to fire her and ruin her reputation in retaliation for Wayt’s efforts to organize workers.

UConn Graduate Teaching Assistants Win Big with First Contract: Approximately 2,300 graduate teaching assistants at the University of Connecticut represented by the Graduate Employee Union, a branch of the United Auto Workers, reached a tentative agreement on a first contract with the university, ensuring an increase in stipends, a break in university fees, and greater health benefits.

Major Health Insurer Ensures Healthy Relations with Workers by Raising Wages: In the wake of national calls by workers to raise wages, Fortune 100 health insurance company Aetna increased pay for their lowest paid workers to $16 an hour last month, raising wages for 5,700 employees. Aetna executives cited evidence that a higher-paid workforce provides better customer service and decreases turnover as reasons for the pay hike.

New York Workers Press Lawmakers to Pass Landmark Equal Pay Law: Workers in New York secured a major win last month as the New York State legislature passed a slate of equal pay protection laws, including legislation that prohibits employers from telling workers they cannot discuss pay at work, and strengthening prohibitions on paying women and men separately.

Senator Bernie Sanders Rallies The Crowd At The NH AFL-CIO Convention (VIDEO)

Senator Sanders North Conway NH

Here it is the video you have all been waiting for, Senator Bernie Sanders just after announcing he official campaign for President addresses the delegates and friends of the NH AFL-CIO 2015 Convention in North Conway, New Hampshire.

If you already know who Senator Bernie Sanders is, then watch this video and you will fall in love with him all over again.

If you do not know who Senator Bernie Sanders is, then watch this video and see what his vision is for America.

  • A vision where healthcare is a right and everyone has quality healthcare provided to them
  • A vision where our children get a good high quality education and can get a college education without being saddled with hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loan debt.
  • A vsion where a single mother does not need to get food stamps to feed her son even though she already works full time.  Where workers are paid a living wage of $15 an hour minimum.
  • A vision where the government listens to the scientific community and starts to reverse the effects of global warming and leaving our planet better for our children and grandchildren
  • A vision where corporations pay their fair share in taxes and are no longer allowed to hide their profits in offshore accounts to avoid paying taxes.
  • A vision where a secretary does not have to pay a higher rate in her taxes than the CEO of the corporation she works for.
  • A vision where American workers are put first and corporate profits are put second.  Where Americans are buying American made goods.  Where American corporations are investing in the future of America by building new manufacturing facilities here in the USA.

Senator Sanders also spoke at length about the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the disastrous effects that NAFTA and previous trade agreements have had on American workers.

The speech is a little over 30 minutes long, but I promise you will hardly notice once Bernie starts rolling!

(Video Link: https://youtu.be/BNejWoktsOs)

Olney Charter Teachers Vote Overwhelmingly to Join Teachers Union

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Teachers Cite Need for a Voice to Advocate for Students and Their Profession at
Philadelphia High School that’s Part of National ASPIRA Charter Chain

PHILADELPHIA—Last night, teachers and support staff at Olney Charter High School in Philadelphia voted overwhelmingly to form a union. They voted by a near three-to-one margin to join with the Philadelphia Alliance of Charter School Employees to gain a voice in how classrooms are resourced and school decisions are made. They also sought greater input into teacher evaluations and professional development.

Olney Charter High School (located on West Duncannon Ave.) is one of five charters run by ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania within the Philadelphia School District. It was carved out of the public system following the state takeover of public city schools in 2001, which handed control of public schools to private operators under a corporate education reform model.

ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania is an affiliate of the national ASPIRA Association, a nonprofit organization focused on education for Latino and other underserved youth. ASPIRA Association operates in eight states and Puerto Rico.

As Olney teachers and staff began organizing, management hired a union-avoidance firm, National Consultants Associated, which has a history of questionable ties to organized crime and individuals charged with federal corruption and racketeering. In the days leading up to the union vote, National Consultants Associated held mandatory anti-union meetings, costing parents face time with teachers, students hours of instruction during annual exam prep, and untold dollars that could have been put to use in classrooms.

The victory for teachers and support staff at Olney is the latest in a string of successful organizing efforts. Teachers at charter schools across the country increasingly are uniting to challenge the conditions that lead to incredibly high turnover in their schools and to improve education for their students. Often, in spite of aggressive anti-union tactics from their employers, teachers vote to join together in a union when given the choice.

“Teachers at charter schools want what other teachers want: respect for the job they do and a real voice in their schools,” said Randi Weingarten, president of the 1.6-million member American Federation of Teachers. “Increasingly, they see how joining a union of professionals is the vehicle to do that. That’s what today’s overwhelming vote was about.”

A total of 172 teachers and support staff are now represented by the union and will soon begin negotiating a first collective bargaining agreement. They also are calling for organizing and collective bargaining rights for teachers and staff at all ASPIRA Inc. schools. On May 12, teachers and staff at John B. Stetson Charter School, another ASPIRA school, filed a petition with the National Labor Relations Board requesting a union vote. The Board has yet to rule on the request.

“We look forward to forging a new relationship with ASPIRA of Pennsylvania,” said Ted Kirsch, president of AFT Pennsylvania and an AFT vice president. “By opening its planning and decision-making process to teachers, staff and parents, ASPIRA has an opportunity to make its schools a model for innovation and collaboration in K-12 charter schools.”

The AFT represents teachers and support staff in more than 120 public charter schools in 12 states.

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