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Congresswoman Shea-Porter Works To Address NH’s Manufacturing Woes

Shea-Porter Announces UNH Project to Address State’s Advanced Manufacturing Workforce Needs

Rep Shea-Porter at the 2016 NH AFL-CIO Labor Day Breakfast showing her support for working families.

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter (NH-01) today announced that the University of New Hampshire has been awarded a $300,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to launch a pilot project in collaboration with the state’s community colleges and advanced manufacturing partners. The partnership will work to address the workforce needs of New Hampshire’s advanced manufacturing sector.

“This innovative project will leverage New Hampshire’s strengths to address the pressing need for in-state advanced manufacturing workers,” said Shea-Porter. “I congratulate UNH on launching this unique partnership, which will also support low-income students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs at our community colleges.”

UNH’s pilot project will be a collaborative effort with the Community College System of New Hampshire, local advanced manufacturing businesses, and the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs to address workforce development in the advanced manufacturing sector in the state. The grant will provide mentorship, paid internships and job placement for students as well as work with businesses throughout the state. Advanced manufacturing is the use of innovative technology to improve manufacturing products or processes. It’s a leading industry in the Granite State and a $1.7 trillion industry nationwide.

“We are grateful for the support we have received from NSF and Congresswoman Shea-Porter,” said P.T. Vasudevan, senior vice provost for academic affairs at UNH and the principal investigator on the $300,000 grant. “We believe working to support and retain low-income students currently in the degree programs that will help us to grow the pipeline of advance manufacturing workers will benefit not only students and industry leaders in the state, but the state as a whole.”

UNH received one of 27 new awards through NSF’s INCLUDES program, aimed at enhancing U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations through a commitment to diversity and inclusion.

In 2009, Shea-Porter helped initiate New Hampshire’s Advanced Manufacturing Partnership in Education (AMPEd), which was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and has successfully helped New Hampshire businesses and colleges partner to invest in the state’s manufacturing workforce.

Leo W Gerard: Speak Loudly And Carry A Big Aluminum Bat

During this very month last year, aluminum smelters across the United States were closing, one after another. It was as if they produced something useless, not a commodity crucial to everything from beverage cans to fighter jets.

In January of 2016, Alcoa closed its Wenatchee Works in Washington State, costing 428 workers their jobs, sending 428 families into panic, slashing tax revenue counted on by the town of Wenatchee and the school district and devastating local businesses that no longer saw customers from the region’s highest-paying manufacturer.

That same month, Alcoa announced it would permanently close its Warrick Operations in Evansville, Ind., then the largest smelter in the country, employing 600 workers, within three months.

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Worker at Alcoa’s Warrick smelter in Evansville, Ind., before it closed in 2016. Photo by Steven Dietz, Sharp Image Studios, Pittsburgh.

Then, Noranda Aluminum fell. It laid off more than half of the 850 workers at its New Madrid, Mo., smelter in January, filed for bankruptcy in February and closed in March. The smelter was a family-supporting employer in a low-income region, and when it stopped operating, the New Madrid County School District didn’t get tax payments it was expecting.

This devastation to workers, families, communities and corporations occurred even after Ormet had shuttered a smelter in Ohio in 2013, destroying 700 jobs and Century closed its Hawesville, Ky., smelter, killing 600 jobs, in August of 2015.

It all happened as demand for aluminum in the United States increased.

That doesn’t make sense until China’s role in this disaster is explained.

That role is the reason the Obama administration filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization (WTO) last week. In this case, the president must ignore the old adage about speaking softly. To preserve a vital American manufacturing capability against predatory conduct by a foreign power, the administration must speak loudly and carry a big aluminum bat.

The bottom line is this: American corporations and American workers can compete with any counterpart in the world and win. But when the contest is with a country itself, defeat is virtually assured.

In the case of aluminum, U.S. companies and workers are up against the entire country of China. That is because China is providing its aluminum industry with cheap loans from state-controlled banks and artificially low prices for critical manufacturing components and materials such as electricity, coal and alumina.

By doing that, China is subsidizing its aluminum industry. And that is fine if China wants to use its revenues to support its aluminum manufacturing or sustain employment – as long as all of the aluminum is sold within China. When state-subsidized products are sold overseas, they distort free market pricing. And that’s why they’re banned.

China agreed not to subsidize exports in order to get access to the WTO. But it has routinely and unabashedly flouted the rules on products ranging from tires to paper to steel to aluminum that it dumps on the American market, resulting in closed U.S. factories, killed U.S. jobs and bleak U.S. communities.

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Worker at Alcoa’s Warrick Operations in Evansville, Ind., before the smelter closed in 2016. Photo by Steven Dietz, Sharp Image Studios, Pittsburgh.

In 2000, China produced about 11 percent of the aluminum on the global market. That figure is now 50 percent. A big part of the reason is that China quadrupled its capacity to produce aluminum from 2007 to 2015, and increased its production by 154 percent.

When China threw all of that extra, cheap, state-subsidized aluminum on the global market, it depressed prices. In that eight-year period, the price sank approximately 46 percent.

To compete, American smelters tried cutting costs and getting better deals on electricity. But even as U.S. demand increased, U.S. production declined 37 percent. And capacity decreased 46 percent.

What capacity decrease means is closed plants. The number of smelters dropped from 14 in 2011 to five last year, with only one operating at full volume.

Many of these manufacturing workers, thrown out of their jobs by what is clearly unfair trade, saw President-elect Donald Trump as a champion. Donald Trump said he would hold China to account on trade. He promised he would impose massive tariffs on goods imported from China. He said he would confront Beijing on currency manipulation, a practice that makes Chinese goods artificially cheap.

Many of those manufacturing workers voted for Donald Trump. Monroe County, Ohio, is a good example. That was the home of the Ormet smelter. The workers, who belonged to my union, the United Steelworkers, and the company asked Ohio Gov. John Kasich in 2012 and 2013 to intervene with the utility to get lower rates to help Ormet survive.

Kasich refused. The smelter closed. Monroe County’s unemployment rate now is the highest in Ohio at 9 percent, nearly twice the national rate.

Monroe County voters didn’t forget. Theirs was among the counties in Ohio that went for Donald Trump in the Republican primary. Though Trump didn’t win the Ohio primary, he got 35.9 percent in the crowded GOP field, and he took virtually all of the places in Ohio that, like Monroe, would say Kasich and other politicians turned their backs on them.

President-elect Trump carried 29 of Ohio’s Appalachian counties in the primary, those described as “geographically isolated and economically depressed.” These are counties that, like Monroe, lost family-supporting jobs in steel, manufacturing or mining. For the workers who haven’t left, the jobs that remain, in retail and fast food, don’t pay much, don’t provide benefits and aren’t secure.

When Donald Trump came to town talking tough about China, that sounded a hell of a lot better to those workers than their governor telling them he wouldn’t help with electrical rates – especially after they watched the governor in New York work a deal to save an Alcoa smelter and 600 jobs for 3 years in Massena.

And, of course, Donald Trump won Ohio in the General Election.

Workers across America, from Sebree, Ky., and Mt. Holly, S.C., where Century smelters are threatened to Wenatchee, Wash., where Alcoa has held out the possibility that the smelter could be restarted, were galvanized to support Donald Trump by his promises to confront China on its predatory trade practices.  If he fulfills those pledges, he will have the back of the blue-collar workers who had his.

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Worker at Alcoa’s Warrick smelter in Evansville, Ind., before it closed last year. Photo by Steven Dietz, Sharp Image Studios, Pittsburgh.

Local Massachusetts Union Shirt Manufacturer Featured In New Clinton Campaign Ad

New England Shirt Company ShirtIn New Ad, U.S. Shirtmaker Criticizes
Trump for Outsourcing Jobs, Making Products Overseas

Small Business Owner: ‘Trump Says He’ll Make America Great Again
While He’s Taking the Shirts Right Off Our Backs’

new Hillary for America television ad set to air this week features a Massachusetts shirt manufacturer who employs more than 60 people criticizing Donald Trump for outsourcing jobs to make his products, including shirts, abroad. In the ad, Robert Kidder, the owner of New England Shirt Company in Fall River, says, “This factory has been here since 1883. We have over 60 people here making shirts labeled ‘Made in America,’ but Donald Trump’s brand of shirts come from China, his suits from Mexico, his coats from India.”

Going back to the colonial era, Fall River, Mass., has been central to America’s textile industry, and the New England Shirt Company remains the oldest operating ready-to-wear shirt manufacturer in America. Not only has New England Shirt Company been making shirts in Fall River for over 130 years, but they are also proudly union. Workers are represented by The New England Joint Board, a region group of UNITE HERE locals and “is one of the largest unions in the region representing manufacturing workers.”

Textile manufacturing unions in New England were some of the first and strongest unions in the country in the late 1800 and early 1900s.  Women and children slaved in the mills from Manchester, New Hampshire, through Lawrence, Massachusetts, through Lowell, Massachusetts, and all the way down to New York City.

Unions like the The International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) fought for workplace safety, shorter workdays, and for two full days of rest a week.  Workers banded together and pushed the Massachusetts legislature to pass strong labor like and to be the first to pass child labor laws that prevented children from working in the mills.  Laws that were later passed nationally as part of the National Labor Relations Act.

In 1976,  The International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union and the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America merged to form UNITE who in 1996 merged with HERE, the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union, becoming UNITE HERE.

The ad, ‘Shirts,’ joins a previously released ad, “Some Place,” in spotlighting Trump’s long history of making Trump-branded products outside of America as part of a concerted effort over the past month to contrast Trump’s hypocritical business record with Hillary Clinton’s agenda to make the economy work for everyone, not just those at the top. The new ad follows Clinton’s announcement Tuesday of new plans to jumpstart small business startups and strengthen small business growthKidder, the small business owner, closes the new ad, “Donald Trump says he’ll ‘make America great again’ while he’s taking the shirts right off our backs.”

Watch ‘Shirts’

The 30-second ad is a part of and ad buy in Florida, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

Clinton has pledged make the largest investment in job creation since World War II in her first 100 days in office and has proposed a comprehensive “Make It In America” strategy to boost U.S. manufacturing and crack down on corporations that ship jobs overseas.

New AFL-CIO Trade Video Warns That TPP Would Double Down on NAFTA’s Economic Devastation

“We can’t have another NAFTA. There’s too much at risk. It’s too important. What happens if TPP passes? There will be another generation of people that can’t find work.”

(Washington, DC) – Today, the AFL-CIO released a video showing first-hand the devastating economic impact the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) could have on communities across the country.

Last week United Steelworkers President Leo Gerard testified at a USTR hearing examining overcapacity in the global steel market and its impact on U.S. steelmakers. There is evidence that foreign governments are subsidizing cheap steel and selling it in the U.S. at unfairly low prices. Countries are able to dump their cheap steel in U.S. markets because they are undervaluing their currency when setting prices.

“Currency manipulation is at the heart of this issue, and the passage of the TPP – which doesn’t address this global problem – could kill American manufacturing for good,” said Gerard. Like NAFTA, it offers no protection for American manufacturing or American workers. U.S. trade policy has not worked for working people or our communities which has led to broad opposition to the TPP. It must be defeated.”

“We know the TPP is a job killer.” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. “Our trade agreements should help to create good jobs in America, and enable regular working people to succeed by working hard to get ahead. The TPP fails this goal miserably.”

“I’ve seen too many people have their lives destroyed because the jobs went away,” said Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Council Member Dewitt Walton. “We can’t have another NAFTA. There’s too much at risk. It’s too important. What happens if TPP passes? There will be another generation of people that can’t find work.”

Allegheny County which is featured in the video is one of hundreds of local and state governments that have passed or introduced resolutions opposing TPP.

This video is the second in a series examining the real human impact of trade agreements like the TPP. Watch the first video on how the TPP could put the lives of cancer patients in danger.

Clinton, Adding to Jobs Agenda, Proposes New Tax Incentives to Revitalize U.S. Manufacturing

 hillary clinton (WisPolitics.com FLIKR)

As part of her plan to create good-paying jobs for American workers, Hillary Clinton is outlining a strategy to win the race to lead the world in advanced manufacturing. The centerpiece of her announcement is a major new tax credit – dubbed the “Manufacturing Renaissance Tax Credit” – to incentivize investment in communities that are at risk of a downward spiral because they have seen manufacturing jobs and production depart.

“My plan will help spur reinvestment in communities that have lost jobs because of factory closures,” Clinton said. “By strengthening our manufacturing sector for the future, we can help create the next generation of good-paying jobs and put more people back to work across the country.” 

Clinton’s announcement continues her month-long focus on a jobs agenda that will lead to higher incomes for hard-working Americans. It comes on the heels of her $275 billion plan to invest in U.S. infrastructure, which was announced last week.

Clinton is focused on manufacturing because it is a source of higher-paying American jobs, with studies showing it pays between 8 and 20 percent higher than other industries.

Under Clinton’s manufacturing agenda, communities would be eligible to apply for tax relief after a significant plant closure or round of layoffs in their area. Clinton’s new tax credit would offer options for relief modeled after the existing New Markets Tax Credit, which one survey found, on average, has supported projects worth $16 million. They could also be eligible for relief for long-term investments, or refurbishing and repurposing facilities. 

Clinton would also expand President Obama’s “National Network for Manufacturing Innovation” program, which supports regional hubs that bring together workers, business, universities, and community colleges to develop world-leading technologies and production that anchor good-paying jobs. In addition, her plan would double funding for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership – a public-private program that provides federal support to help small and mid-sized American manufacturers compete – while insisting on strong domestic sourcing requirements and “Buy American” provisions so that materials that are “Made in the USA” receive priority. 

Clinton’s agenda extends her long record of fighting to expand manufacturing and boost American jobs. As Senator, Clinton co-founded the bipartisan Senate Manufacturing Caucus, fought Bush Administration efforts to cut support for manufacturing, and called for a “New Manhattan Project” to rebuild American manufacturing. 

A fact sheet on Clinton’s manufacturing proposals is available here.

Leo W Gerard: The TPP — Another Deadly Trade Deal

President Obama (WH IMAGE Pete Souza)

President Obama (Official WH Images, Photograph by Pete Souza)

Americans who once earned family-supporting wages working in factories, foundries and mills across this country began destroying themselves at a shocking rate five years after implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

That’s because such deals – schemes exactly like the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement released last week – encouraged corporations to offshore manufacturing, decimating decent American jobs and the lives of decent American workers.

Unemployed, desperate and despairing, these once-middle-class workers are killing themselves at unconscionable rates with guns, heroin and alcohol-induced cirrhosis. To such workers, the TPP would mean more tragedy, more death. The opposite is true for CEOs, shareholders and Wall Street financiers. To them, the TPP would mean even more luxury, more wealth. Trade schemes like the TPP further rig the economy in favor of the already-rich and against the hard-working rest.

2015-11-08-1447010232-5776390-Mortalityrategraph.jpg

Purple dashed line shows rising death rate for white men aged 45 to 54 with high school diplomas or less education. Red line is black mortality rate for same age group; green line is Hispanic; teal is caucasian.

Two Princeton economists last week published a study showing that white, middle-aged Americans with high school diplomas or less education are dying at a faster rate than they did before NAFTA. They began suffering diminished life expectancy in 1999.

That stands in stark contrast to all other age and ethnic groups, including African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Europeans, whose health and life expectancy have improved.

The typical killers, diabetes and heart disease, didn’t take these white Americans aged 45 to 54. It was suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol abuse.

Before 1999, the mortality rate for this group, as for the others, had been declining. Since then, their rising rate means, “half a million people are dead who should not be dead,” said study co-author Angus Deaton, a 2015 Nobel Prize winner. That is close to the number of Americans killed by HIV-AIDS.

Unlike AIDS, this has been a silent epidemic, unexposed until the report by Deaton and co-author Anne Case. The cause of the self-slaughter, the researchers suggested, is financial strain.

Bread winners couldn’t pay their bills and couldn’t foresee a future when they could. That is because jobs in manufacturing and construction – jobs that had provided middle-class incomes for workers without college degrees for decades – disappeared.

Between 1997, three years after NAFTA took effect, and 2014, the country lost more than 5 million manufacturing jobs.  The vast majority, according to the Economic Policy Institute, vanished as a result of growing trade deficits with countries that the United States signed so-called free trade and investment deals with.

Just since 2001, 56,000 American factories closed. Corporations moved many of these to low-wage, low-worker-safety, low-environmental-protection countries with which the United States has so-called free trade deals enabling the companies to sell the foreign-made products in America with little or no tariffs or duties.

The TPP, the largest so-called free trade deal ever, encompassing a dozen Pacific-Rim countries including forced and child labor violators Brunei and Vietnam, would send even more American industry and jobs overseas.

The Wall Street Journal calculated that the TPP would increase the U.S. trade deficit in manufacturing, car assembly and car parts by $55.8 billion a year by 2025. Using the U.S. Department of Commerce estimate of 6,000 jobs lost for every $1 billion in trade deficits, the TPP would cost another 330,000 American manufacturing workers their jobs, their income, their hopes. Maybe their lives.

That 330,000 probably is a low-ball estimate because the TPP negotiators secured no enforceable protections for American workers. For example, the TPP would provide no way to compel partner countries to stop manipulating their currencies to gain competitive advantage over American manufacturers. Countries like Japan, Singapore and Malaysia, all TPP partners, lower the value of their currencies to make their exports cheaper in the American market and American exports to theirs more expensive. Ford Motor Co. opposes the TPP for this reason.

Similarly, the TPP fails to include enforceable methods to stop foreign labor abuses including poverty wages and violations of collective bargaining rights. This facilitates the race to the bottom on wages. Corporations move factories overseas because they can’t get away with paying Americans the 90 cents an hour that is the average wage in Vietnam.

Also, disastrously, the TPP would lower the content requirement for cars and auto parts to be considered produced in a TPP country. NAFTA set the figure at 62.5 percent for cars. That meant 37.5 percent of a car could be manufactured in China, shipped to Mexico for assembly and the car deemed made in Mexico for tariff purposes.

The TPP would reduce the domestic content percentage to 45, so that 55 percent of a vehicle – more than half – could be manufactured in China and the car still considered made in a TPP country and benefit from zero tariffs when shipped to the United States.

In addition, the TPP’s proposal to immediately eliminate U.S. tariffs but allow TPP partners to sustain theirs for years would lure U.S. factories offshore. That’s because it means corporations would have to pay tariffs to ship American-made goods to TPP partners, but they would pay none if they move manufacturing to a TPP country and export to the United States.

Another way the TPP would send American work overseas is by ending the Buy American preference. The trade deal would allow any TPP partner to bid on federal contracts, so American tax dollars would be spent to create jobs in TPP countries like Mexico and Malaysia instead of in the United States.

Literally hundreds of lobbyists were given a seat at the secret TPP negotiating table, resulting in these rules favoring multi-national corporations. For decades, the regulations for international commerce, for so-called free trade, have lined the pockets of the already wealthy and emptied those of workers thrown out of their jobs.

It was cruel enough that America countenanced for decades so-called free trade that cost millions of U.S. manufacturing workers their source of family-supporting income. But now that it’s clear that bad trade schemes also cost workers their lives, the TPP must be stopped. It cannot be permitted to kill more Americans who want so desperately to work.

When Will NH Manufacturers Quit Fabricating Stories About Not Having Qualified Workers

Manufacturing Tech Expo at College of DuPage 2014 (COD Newsroom FLIKR)

Manufacturing Tech Expo at College of DuPage 2014 (COD Newsroom FLIKR)

This morning the Union Leader posted an article about New Hampshire manufacturers, like GE, who are looking for highly skilled, highly educated workers to fill vacant jobs.

“Signal processing, navigation, optics and measurement are particularly advantaged in New Hampshire,” she said. “No other state is doing this type of advanced manufacturing to the same degree as New Hampshire.”

The state also shines in semi-conductors, complex electronics, precision machining, aerospace and defense, medical devices and technology. But there’s a problem.

“Take precision machining,” said Lands. “We found the average age of a worker in that field is in the mid-50s, which means that precision machining knowledge is walking out the door, and is not easily replaced. It is not something that can be learned from a textbook. It is something that has to be apprenticed at the hands of an experienced machinist.”

Folsum from GE Aviation pointed out that the average age at his plant is 50, and he is trying to hire 300 people. “I think we are representative of a lot of manufacturers,” he said. “That’s why we’re here.”

…”Employers are not expecting high schools or community colleges to turn out master machinists. They’re looking for entry-level employees with the basic skills needed to succeed in an apprenticeship program.”

Two things jump out at me instantly when I read this article.

1. Your aging workforce has probably been working there for decades and those workers started when manufacturing paid workers well and was the gateway to the middle class.   They started when working in a manufacturing plant was a prestigious, well respected position for many people and especially for those who choose not to go to college or were unable to make it.

Manufacturers would hire workers, and in partnership with the union, train them to do the job.  Together the union and the employer would continue to train workers so they could move up and make better money and stay right inside the plant.

Now manufacturing has changed.  It is highly technical and many employers require college degrees before they will even consider an employee.  This leads into my second question.

2. What are you paying these “apprentices” in your manufacturing plants?

You cannot expect college graduates, most likely with massive student loan debt, to jump up and take a job in a manufacturing plant at rock-bottom wages.  Now I do not know what GE, or the others, offer in starting pay (because they do not post it on their jobs listings), but I would venture a guess that it is not high enough.

For a long time now New Hampshire has had a problem with our young workers leaving the state and our population growing older and older.  The “graying” of the workforce is a combination of low-wages offered by employers and high cost of living, so young people are fleeing the state.  (This is also in part to our extremely high cost of college.)  They go off to find jobs in cheaper places to live.  They are not finding better jobs, but they feel they are making more because they spend less to live.

I am glad the Governor, Colleges and Universities, and business leaders are coming together to talk about the needs of the business community, however you have to stop telling us that there are no workers with the education you require.

According to national data from EPI, the unemployment rate of 2015 college graduates is 7.9% and an under-employment rate of 14.9%.

The people are out there but what are NH manufactures willing to do to attract them here?  The simple solution is to raise the wages and you will attract highly educated, highly qualified individuals who would like to live and work in New Hampshire.

Manufacturing’s problem is not that there are not enough educated workers out there to do the job, it is there are not enough college educated adults willing to do the work for the wages you offer.

Governor Hassan Kicks Off Annual Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit

Highlights Importance of NH Manufacturing Industry to the Economy, Discusses Efforts to Strengthen Workforce, Support Job-Creating Businesses

Image by The Lead Us FLIKR

Image by The Lead Us FLIKR

MANCHESTER – Highlighting the importance of the advanced manufacturing and high-tech industry to New Hampshire’s economy, Governor Maggie Hassan today kicked off the 12th Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit.           

“As the state’s largest industry, manufacturing is critical to strengthening the foundation for the innovation economy that will expand middle class opportunity and keep New Hampshire moving in the right direction,” Governor Hassan said. “But we know that there is more we need to do to keep our economy moving forward, to keep manufacturing jobs in New Hampshire and to attract new advanced manufacturing and high-tech companies to the Granite State.” 

Presented by the Business and Industry Association, the New Hampshire High Technology Council, the New Hampshire Manufacturing Extension Partnership, and the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development, the Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit brings together businesses, educational institutions, local economic development officials and other manufacturing experts for workshops and networking opportunities aimed at sharing best practices in order to help the industry continue to grow and create jobs. 

“Today’s summit is a great example of the New Hampshire Way, citizens coming together – Republicans, Democrats and Independents – to solve long-standing challenges and get things done for New Hampshire’s people, businesses and economy,” Governor Hassan said. “But I want to continue to hear from you about what you need to continue thriving and creating jobs here in New Hampshire for years to come, because ensuring state government is responsive to the needs of the advanced manufacturing and high-tech community is critical as we work together to strengthen the foundation for the 21st century economy.” 

Since entering office, Governor Hassan has focused on supporting innovative, job-creating businesses in order to expand middle class opportunity and keep New Hampshire’s economy moving in the right direction. The Governor restored funding for higher education in her bipartisan budget in exchange for the first in-state tuition freeze at the University System of New Hampshire in 25 years and a five-percent reduction of in-state tuition at New Hampshire’s community colleges that began this fall.

The bipartisan budget also revitalized the state’s economic development activities, fully funded the Director of Economic Development for the first time in years, increased travel and tourism promotion and improved international trade assistance.

In order to make it easier for high-tech businesses to start up and flourish in New Hampshire, Governor Hassan and the Business Finance Authority launched Live Free and Start, an initiative that brings together accomplished business leaders and entrepreneurs to make recommendations on how to modernize business regulations and how to improve technology used to do business with the state.

Governor Hassan and the Department of Resources and Economic Development have also launched a manufacturing video contest that partners advanced manufacturing companies with local schools in order to engage New Hampshire’s students and help them understand that there are exciting and interesting career opportunities at manufacturing companies across the state.

“Recognizing the importance of manufacturing’s role in New Hampshire’s economy and connecting students with our state’s innovative businesses is vital to our future and to keeping New Hampshire’s economy moving in the right direction,” said Senator Molly Kelly. “I want to thank Governor Hassan for her efforts in highlighting our state’s manufacturing and I applaud and the NH Manufacturing Extension Partnership for bringing New Hampshire’s manufacturers and educational institutions together and making this week such a success.”

“A quality education not only prepares our children for a brighter future, but it helps expand opportunities for all. A strong and well-educated workforce helps attract new, good-paying jobs to New Hampshire and strengthens our economy as a whole,” said Sen. Kelly. “Our state has a vibrant history of manufacturing, but we need to do everything we can to ensure that New Hampshire continues to lead the innovation economy of the 21st century. Connecting our students to careers in manufacturing is an important step in ensuring that we have a strong workforce that helps attract new businesses, creates new jobs, and keeps our state’s economy moving in the right direction.”

The 12th Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit marked the culmination of Manufacturing Week in New Hampshire, which Governor Hassan proclaimed as September 29 through October 3 in order to recognize manufacturing’s vital role in New Hampshire’s economy.

For the full text of the Governor’s proclamation, click here.

 

Governor Hassan, DRED Launch Second Annual What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? Video Contest

Image by TheLeadUS FLIKR

Image by TheLeadUS FLIKR

CONCORD – In order to engage New Hampshire students and to encourage them to learn about exciting and interesting career opportunities in advanced manufacturing, Governor Hassan and Department of Resources and Economic Development Commissioner Jeffrey Rose are launching the second annual What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? video contest.

Through partnering participating schools and local manufacturers to produce a video focused on career opportunities in manufacturing, the What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? video contest is designed to introduce middle school students to careers of the future in advanced manufacturing and what they can do to prepare for them.

“By participating in this video contest, students will come to understand the importance of manufacturing firsthand and how a career in manufacturing helps families across the state expand their opportunities,” Governor Hassan said. “Students can learn about how interesting and exciting these jobs are, lessons that I hope they will pass on to their peers so that this critical industry can continue to thrive and create good jobs for years to come.”

In the video contest’s first year, 12 middle schools across the state produced 13 videos. Fairgrounds Junior High School in Nashua took first place, followed by North Hampton School and Pittsfield Middle School. To view last year’s winning videos, visit https://www.youtube.com/user/NHEconomy.

Below is the First Place winner in last year’s video contest and the entire playlist of submissions.

“In the first year of the contest, middle school students from around the state created some engaging and informative videos that highlighted their interest and curiosity about advanced manufacturing,” Commissioner Jeffrey Rose said. “The contest was a great introduction to the people and processes who manufacture great things right in their hometowns.”

Students and advisors can work with local manufacturers on their video starting now through the February 2 project deadline. Teachers interested in participating can get more information on partnering with a local manufacturer, as well as video contest rules, at http://www.nheconomy.com/videocontest/ or by contacting Christopher Way, deputy director, Division of Economic Development at 271-2341.

Governor Hassan Kicks Off Annual Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit

Highlights Importance of NH Manufacturing Industry to the Economy, Discusses Efforts to Strengthen Workforce, Support Job-Creating Businesses

MANCHESTER – Highlighting the importance of the advanced manufacturing and high-tech industry to New Hampshire’s economy, Governor Maggie Hassan today kicked off the 12th Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit.

“As the state’s largest industry, manufacturing is critical to strengthening the foundation for the innovation economy that will expand middle class opportunity and keep New Hampshire moving in the right direction,” Governor Hassan said. “But we know that there is more we need to do to keep our economy moving forward, to keep manufacturing jobs in New Hampshire and to attract new advanced manufacturing and high-tech companies to the Granite State.”

Presented by the Business and Industry Association, the New Hampshire High Technology Council, the New Hampshire Manufacturing Extension Partnership, and the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development, the Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit brings together businesses, educational institutions, local economic development officials and other manufacturing experts for workshops and networking opportunities aimed at sharing best practices in order to help the industry continue to grow and create jobs.

“Today’s summit is a great example of the New Hampshire Way, citizens coming together – Republicans, Democrats and Independents – to solve long-standing challenges and get things done for New Hampshire’s people, businesses and economy,” Governor Hassan said. “But I want to continue to hear from you about what you need to continue thriving and creating jobs here in New Hampshire for years to come, because ensuring state government is responsive to the needs of the advanced manufacturing and high-tech community is critical as we work together to strengthen the foundation for the 21st century economy.”

Since entering office, Governor Hassan has focused on supporting innovative, job-creating businesses in order to expand middle class opportunity and keep New Hampshire’s economy moving in the right direction. The Governor restored funding for higher education in her bipartisan budget in exchange for the first in-state tuition freeze at the University System of New Hampshire in 25 years and a five-percent reduction of in-state tuition at New Hampshire’s community colleges that began this fall.

The bipartisan budget also revitalized the state’s economic development activities, fully funded the Director of Economic Development for the first time in years, increased travel and tourism promotion and improved international trade assistance.

In order to make it easier for high-tech businesses to start up and flourish in New Hampshire, Governor Hassan and the Business Finance Authority launched Live Free and Start, an initiative that brings together accomplished business leaders and entrepreneurs to make recommendations on how to modernize business regulations and how to improve technology used to do business with the state.

Governor Hassan and the Department of Resources and Economic Development have also launched a manufacturing video contest that partners advanced manufacturing companies with local schools in order to engage New Hampshire’s students and help them understand that there are exciting and interesting career opportunities at manufacturing companies across the state.

The 12th Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit marked the culmination of Manufacturing Week in New Hampshire, which Governor Hassan proclaimed as September 29 through October 3 in order to recognize manufacturing’s vital role in New Hampshire’s economy. For the full text of the Governor’s proclamation, click here.

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