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12-18-14 List Of Open Union Communications Positions From UnionJobs

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DECEMBER 18, 2014 WEEKLY SUMMARY OF COMMUNICATIONS POSITIONS POSTED AT UNIONJOBS.COM

AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations)
Data Coordinator – Wisconsin, Campaigns Department – Midwest Region, Wisconsin
Campaign Coordinator – Ohio, Campaigns Department Midwest Region  Ohio
Popular Education Coordinator, Campaigns Department  District of Columbia
Communications Coordinator, Communications Department (MW Region)  Michigan
Organizing Field Communications Assistant, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Development Manager, Digital Strategies Department  District of Columbia
Strategic Campaigns Coordinator, Organizing Department  District of Columbia

AFM (American Federation of Musicians)
Communications Director, New York  New York

AFSCME (Council 3)
Database Analyst and IT Coordinator, Baltimore  Maryland

AFT (American Federation of Teachers)
Human/Civil Rights Advocacy Director, Human Rights and Community Relations Department District of Columbia

ALPA (Air Line Pilots Association, International)
Sr. Communications Specialist, Herndon  Virginia

ATU (Amalgamated Transit Union)
Campaign Organizer Intern  District of Columbia

CMD (The Center for Media and Democracy)
Manager, Digital/Social Media, based in Madison  Wisconsin

CNA/NNU (California Nurses Association (CNA) / National Nurses United (NNU) AFL-CIO)
Video Specialist, Oakland  California

CPD (Center for Popular Democracy)
Fair Workweek Deputy Campaign Director, New York City preferred  New York

CSEA (AFSCME, Local 1000, New York)
Labor Education Specialist, Albany  New York

CWA (Communications Workers of America)
Digital Media Technician  District of Columbia

CWA-NJ (Communications Workers of America, New Jersey)
Social Media Organizer, Trenton based  New Jersey

JCEA (Jefferson County Education Association)
Director of Field Operations and Political Action, Lakewood  Colorado

Kaiser Permanente LMP(Labor Management Partnership)
Labor Relations Communications Director, Oakland  California

Labor Notes
Assistant Editor, New York New York

NELP (National Employment Law Project)
Campaign Coordinator (Home Care Fair Pay), New York (with an option of DC office)  New York

NNU (National Nurses United)
Educator – Immediate Opening, San Francisco Bay area  California
Communications Specialist, Oakland California

NTEU (National Treasury Employees Union)
Director of Information Systems  District of Columbia

NYCOSH (New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health)
Communications Director, New York City  New York

NYHTC (New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council)
Video Communications SupervisorNew York

OEA (Oregon Education Association)
Communications PR/Media Consultant  Oregon

RTF (Raise the Floor Alliance)
Campaign Coordinator, Chicago  Illinois

SEIU (Local 1)
Communications Specialist, Detroit  Michigan

SEIU (1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East)
Communications Specialist, Boston  Massachusetts

SEIU (Local 32BJ)
Member Communications Strategist, New York City  New York
Communications Specialist: Mid-Atlantic Region, Philadelphia based Pennsylvania

SEIU (Local 721)
Communications Specialist  California

UDWA (United Domestic Workers of America)
Media Relations Specialist, Sacramento  California

UFCW (United Food and Commercial Workers International Union)
Senior Strategic Targeting Coordinator, Washington D.C.  District of Columbia

UFT (United Federation of Teachers)
Social Media Coordinator, New York City  New York

UPTE-CWA (University Professional and Technical Employees-Communications Workers of America)
Systemwide Director  California

WOCC (Workers’ Organizing Committee of Chicago-Fight for 15)
Communications Associate, Chicago  Illinois

Working America(a community affiliate of the AFL-CIO)
Communications Director  District of Columbia

12-11-14 List Of Open Union Communications Positions From UnionJobs

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DECEMBER 11, 2014 WEEKLY SUMMARY OF COMMUNICATIONS POSITIONS POSTED AT UNIONJOBS.COM

AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations)
Communications Coordinator, Communications Department (MW Region)  Michigan
Organizing Field Communications Assistant, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Development Manager, Digital Strategies Department  District of Columbia
Strategic Campaigns Coordinator, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Safety and Health Fellow, AFL-CIO Safety and Health Department  District of Columbia
Corporate Research Analyst, Office of Investment  District of Columbia


AFSCME
(Council 3)
Database Analyst and IT Coordinator, Baltimore  Maryland

AFT (American Federation of Teachers)
Human/Civil Rights Advocacy Director, Human Rights and Community Relations Department District of Columbia

ALPA (Air Line Pilots Association, International)
Sr. Communications Specialist, Herndon  Virginia

BAC (International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers)
Data Entry/Research Clerk  District of Columbia

CNA/NNU (California Nurses Association (CNA) / National Nurses United (NNU) AFL-CIO)
Video Specialist, Oakland  California

CPD (Center for Popular Democracy)
Fair Workweek Deputy Campaign Director, New York City preferred  New York

CWA (Communications Workers of America)
Digital Media Technician  District of Columbia

CWA-NJ (Communications Workers of America, New Jersey)
Social Media Organizer, Trenton based  New Jersey

Kaiser Permanente LMP(Labor Management Partnership)
Labor Relations Communications Director, Oakland  California

Labor Notes
Assistant Editor, New York New York

NELP (National Employment Law Project)
Campaign Coordinator (Home Care Fair Pay), New York (with an option of DC office)  New York

NNU (National Nurses United)
Educator – Immediate Opening, San Francisco Bay area  California
Communications Specialist, Oakland California

NYCOSH (New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health)
Communications Director, New York City  New York

NYHTC (New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council)
Video Communications SupervisorNew York

OEA (Oregon Education Association)
Communications PR/Media Consultant  Oregon

RTF (Raise the Floor Alliance)
Campaign Coordinator, Chicago  Illinois

SEIU (Local 1)
Communications Specialist, Detroit  Michigan

SEIU (1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East)
Communications Specialist, Boston  Massachusetts

SEIU (Local 32BJ)
Member Communications Strategist, New York City  New York
Communications Specialist: Mid-Atlantic Region, Philadelphia based Pennsylvania

SEIU (Local 721)
Communications Specialist  California

UDWA (United Domestic Workers of America)
Media Relations Specialist, Sacramento  California

UFCW (United Food and Commercial Workers International Union)
Senior Strategic Targeting Coordinator, Washington D.C.  District of Columbia

UFT (United Federation of Teachers)
Social Media Coordinator, New York City  New York

SEIU (SEIU UHW West, United Healthcare Workers West)
Database Analyst, Oakland  California

UPTE-CWA (University Professional and Technical Employees-Communications Workers of America)
Systemwide Director  California

WOCC (Workers’ Organizing Committee of Chicago-Fight for 15)
Communications Associate, Chicago  Illinois

Working America(a community affiliate of the AFL-CIO)
Communications Director  District of Columbia

President Obama Defies Unions And Fellow Democrats To Push For The TPP

StopTPP

In really crappy news, President Obama announced today that he is willing to defy Democrats and the labor unions that helped elect him to side with Republicans to push through the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

“Those who oppose these trade deals ironically are accepting a status quo that is more damaging to American workers,” Obama said at the Business Roundtable. “There are folks in my own party and in my own constituency that have legitimate complaints about some of the trend lines of inequality, but are barking up the wrong tree when it comes to opposing TPP, and I’m going to have to make that argument.”

Barking up the wrong tree? Working families do not need another NAFTA that will continue to decimate American manufacturing. Since NAFTA we have lost millions of good high paying manufacturing jobs. The TPP will open the door for more manufacturers to offshore our jobs.

We do need to create a new trade agreement with our partners in the Far East, but we need to make it harder, not easier, for companies to offshore jobs. We also need to change our tax policies that reward corporations who build factories in China.

The biggest problem with opening up trade with China is that, we as Americans’ are buying billions of dollars worth of Chinese made stuff, yet China is not returning the favor. Comparatively China only buys a fraction of the U.S. made products creating a massive trade deficit.

If we want to see an economy that works for everyone again then we need to boost our own manufacturing base, and stop importing everything.

Look at Germany undoubtedly one of the strongest economies in the world, they have a trade surplus. A trade surplus leads to more jobs and higher wages.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership will do nothing for the millions of struggling workers here in the United States. As cheap Chinese products flood U.S. markets, American manufacturers will be forced to lower wages to compete with the slave labor wages in China. The TPP would only benefit the multi-national corporations who are only looking to boost their already obscene profits.

Any trade policy that does not turn our trade deficit to a trade surplus should be rejected. 

This Weeks Open Communications Positions From UnionJobs.com

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NOVEMBER 21, 2014 WEEKLY SUMMARY OF COMMUNICATIONS POSITIONS POSTED AT UNIONJOBS.COM

AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations)
Communications Coordinator, Communications Department (MW Region)  Michigan
Organizing Field Communications Assistant, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Development Manager, Digital Strategies Department  District of Columbia
Strategic Campaigns Coordinator, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Safety and Health Fellow, AFL-CIO Safety and Health Department  District of Columbia
Corporate Research Analyst, Office of Investment  District of Columbia


Action Now

Communications Director, Chicago  Illinois

AFSCME (Council 3)
Database Analyst and IT Coordinator, Baltimore  Maryland

AFT (American Federation of Teachers)
Human/Civil Rights Advocacy Director, Human Rights and Community Relations Department District of Columbia

ALPA (Air Line Pilots Association, International)
Sr. Communications Specialist, Herndon  Virginia

BAC (International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers)
Data Entry/Research Clerk  District of Columbia

CNA/NNU (California Nurses Association (CNA) / National Nurses United (NNU) AFL-CIO)
Web Editor, Oakland  California

CWA (Communications Workers of America, New Jersey)
Social Media Organizer, Trenton based  New Jersey

Labor Notes
Assistant Editor, New York New York

LECET (Greater New York Laborers-Employers Cooperation and Education Trust)
Coordinator, New Media, New York City  New York

MAPE (Minnesota Association of Professional Employees)
Public Relations Coordinator  Minnesota

NELP (National Employment Law Project)
Campaign Coordinator (Home Care Fair Pay), New York (with an option of DC office)  New York

NNU (National Nurses United)
Educator – Immediate Opening, San Francisco Bay area  California
Communications Specialist, Oakland California

NYHTC (New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council)
Video Communications SupervisorNew York

OEA (Oregon Education Association)
Public Affairs – Lobbyist  Oregon

RTF (Raise the Floor Alliance)
Campaign Coordinator, Chicago  Illinois

SEIU (1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East)
Communications Specialist, Boston  Massachusetts

SEIU (Local 32BJ)
Communications Specialist: CT & NY, based in New York City headquarters  Connecticut, New York
Member Communications Strategist, New York City  New York
Communications Specialist: Mid-Atlantic Region, Philadelphia based Pennsylvania

SEIU (Local 721)
Communications Specialist  California

SEIU (Local 1989, Maine State Employees Association, MSEA-SEIU)
Systems/Database Administrator, Augusta  Maine

UFCW (United Food and Commercial Workers International Union)
Senior Strategic Targeting Coordinator, Washington D.C.  District of Columbia

UFT (United Federation of Teachers)
Digital Content Specialist, New York  New York

SEIU (SEIU UHW West, United Healthcare Workers West)
Database Analyst, Oakland  California

UNITE HERE
Communications Specialist II, Greater Manhattan area  New York

UPTE-CWA (University Professional and Technical Employees-Communications Workers of America)
Systemwide Director  California

Wisconsin Jobs Now
Online Campaigner  National

Working America (a community affiliate of the AFL-CIO)
Writer  District of Columbia
Communications Director  District of Columbia

UnionJobs List Of Open Communication Positions For Nov 13th

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NOVEMBER 13, 2014
POSTED AT
UNIONJOBS.COM

AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations)
Communications Coordinator, Communications Department (MW Region)  Michigan
Organizing Field Communications Assistant, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Development Manager, Digital Strategies Department  District of Columbia
Strategic Campaigns Coordinator, Organizing Department  District of Columbia
Safety and Health Fellow, AFL-CIO Safety and Health Department  District of Columbia
Corporate Research Analyst, Office of Investment  District of Columbia

Action Now
Communications Director, Chicago  Illinois

AFSCME (Council 3)
Database Analyst and IT Coordinator, Baltimore  Maryland

AFT (American Federation of Teachers)
Human/Civil Rights Advocacy Director, Human Rights and Community Relations Department District of Columbia

CNA/NNU (California Nurses Association (CNA) / National Nurses United (NNU) AFL-CIO)
Web Editor, Oakland  California

IFPTE (International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers, Local 21)
Communications And Research Specialist, San Francisco Bay Area California

Labor Notes
Assistant Editor, New York New York

LECET (Greater New York Laborers-Employers Cooperation and Education Trust)
Coordinator, New Media, New York City  New York

MAPE (Minnesota Association of Professional Employees)
Public Relations Coordinator  Minnesota

NNU (National Nurses United)
Educator – Immediate Opening, San Francisco Bay area  California
Communications Specialist, Oakland California

NYHTC (New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council)
Video Communications SupervisorNew York

OEA (Oregon Education Association)
Public Affairs – Lobbyist  Oregon

RTF (Raise the Floor Alliance)
Campaign Coordinator, Chicago  Illinois

SAG-AFTRA (Screen Actors Guild — American Federation of Television and Radio Artists)
Video Specialist – Communications & Marketing Department, Los Angeles  California

SEIU (1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East)
Communications Specialist, Boston  Massachusetts

SEIU (Local 32BJ)
Communications Specialist: CT & NY, based in New York City headquarters  Connecticut, New York
Member Communications Strategist, New York City  New York
Communications Specialist: Mid-Atlantic Region, Philadelphia based Pennsylvania

SEIU (Local 721)
Communications Specialist  California

SEIU (SEIU Healthcare 775NW)
Communications Specialist, Seattle  Washington

UFCW (United Food and Commercial Workers International Union)
Senior Strategic Targeting Coordinator, Washington D.C.  District of Columbia

UFT (United Federation of Teachers)
Digital Content Specialist, New York  New York

UNITE HERE
Communications Specialist II, Greater Manhattan area  New York

UPTE-CWA (University Professional and Technical Employees-Communications Workers of America)
Systemwide Director  California

Wisconsin Jobs Now
Online Campaigner  National

Working America(a community affiliate of the AFL-CIO)
Writer  District of Columbia
Communications Director  District of Columbia

In Case You Don’t Remember: The Republicans Have a “Jobs Plan”

GOP Jobs Plan

Haven’t read this morning’s New York Times? Here’s what you’re missing:

WASHINGTON — Anticipating a takeover of Congress, Republicans have assembled an economic agenda that reflects their small-government, antiregulation philosophy… The proposals would mainly benefit energy industries, reduce taxes and regulations for businesses generally, and continue the attack on the Affordable Care Act. It is a mix that leaves many economists, including several conservatives, underwhelmed.

What’s on the list?


View Fraccidents Map in a larger map

What’s not on the list?

  • Fixing our roads and bridges (even though more than 177,000 bridges around the country are either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete)
  • Overhauling immigration laws (maybe Fox News and the Tea Party think xenophobia is good for the country)

Look again, at that last omission from the Republicans’ “Jobs Plan.”

A bipartisan Senate-passed bill on immigration would increase economic growth by 3.3 percent in a decade and save $175 billion by then, the Congressional Budget Office estimated.

Look again, at what could have been… if only the GOP hadn’t been so determined to stop anything and everything President Obama proposed.

When Mr. Obama sent Congress his jobs package three years ago, several forecasting firms estimated that it could add up to 150,000 jobs a month in the first year.

(Read about the Senate GOP filibuster here.)

Then, remember that the GOP’s opposition started on the first day of Obama’s first term.

WASHINGTON — As President Barack Obama was celebrating his inauguration at various balls, top Republican lawmakers and strategists were conjuring up ways to submarine his presidency at a private dinner in Washington.

And then, think about what this “GOP Jobs Plan” is really all about.

GOP Jobs Plan

Jeanne Shaheen Releases New TV Ad and Three New Digital Ads

Screen shot of Ad

New Shaheen Campaign TV Ad Highlights Clear Choice For New Hampshire

Latest Ad Highlights Shaheen Record Working For NH Small Businesses,
Brown Record Siding With Big Oil, Big Banks and Out-of-State Corporate Interests, Not New Hampshire’s

Today, the Shaheen campaign released a new television ad titled Clear Choice,” which highlights the contrast  between Senator Shaheen’s work making a difference for New Hampshire small businesses and Scott Brown’s record of delivering for corporate special interests like Big Oil, Wall Street and companies that outsource jobs.

To watch the ad, click here

“The choice for Granite Staters is clear: while Jeanne Shaheen has helped countless New Hampshire businesses grow and create jobs, Scott Brown has spent his career delivering for Big Oil, Wall Street and companies that outsource jobs. Scott Brown is not for New Hampshire,” said Shaheen Campaign Communications Director Harrell Kirstein.

The ad discusses how the bipartisan Small Business Jobs Act Shaheen championed and the Small Business Innovation Research Program she fought to expand have both helped New Hampshire businesses grow and create jobs.

“Her Small Business Jobs Act cut our taxes,” says Aaron Bagshaw, Owner of WH Bagshaw, in the ad.

“Jeanne Shaheen championed innovation grants; we’ve hired 50 new people,” says Jenny Houston, Owner of Warwick Mills.

The Small Business Jobs Act cut taxes for small businesses, increased business’ access to credit and helped New Hampshire companies export their products. The Small Business Innovation Research program gives funding to small businesses to invest in research and development.

In contrast, Scott Brown voted against the Small Business Jobs Act, instead supporting billions of dollars in taxpayer subsidies for Big Oil and companies that ship jobs overseas. Scott Brown also secured billions in special breaks for Wall Street when he watered down new regulations on behalf of the big banks.

At a debate on Tuesday, a Concord audience laughed at Scott Brown when he tried to run from his long and well-documented support for companies that outsource jobs; in the Senate, Brown voted to protect tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas and he’s now personally profiting as a board member of a company that sent jobs to China and Mexico.

Shaheen Campaign Also Releases Three Digital Ads Ahead of Thursday Debate

Ads Highlight Choice Between Shaheen Record Fighting for New Hampshire and Brown Record Proving NH Families Can’t Trust Him

Also today, the Shaheen campaign released three digital pre-roll ads that are running online on websites like Hulu, Youtube, and Pandora, which all highlight the choice voters face in the November election. The ads contrast Jeanne Shaheen’s record fighting for New Hampshire and Scott Brown’s positions that show he can’t be trusted to stand up for our state’s women or middle class families.

“With less than two weeks until the election, New Hampshire voters continue to see a very clear choice between a Senator who has spent decades fighting to make a difference for the people of this state and someone who has shown time and time again that he can’t be trusted to stand up for women or middle class families here in New Hampshire,” said Shaheen Campaign Communications Director Harrell Kirstein.

“Whether it’s his votes against equal pay for equal work, his support for legislation that would allow employers to deny women access to contraception or his involvement with shady corporate interests, Scott Brown’s record is clear.  He’s not for New Hampshire,” Kirstein added.

The first ad, titled, Workforce,” discusses the pay gap working women face in today’s economy, the work Senator Shaheen has done to combat pay discrimination, and the Senator’s work to ensure that women should always have the right to make their own healthcare decisions. The ad goes on to discuss Scott Brown’s vote against the Paycheck Fairness Act and co-sponsorship of the Blunt Amendment, which would allow employers to deny women coverage for birth control.

The second, titled Equal Rights,” highlights Scott Brown’s support for legislation that would deny women access to contraception and his opposition to the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would strengthen equal pay protections for women. The ad also discusses Scott Brown’s backward positions on marriage equality, including his past votes to ban gay marriage.

The third ad, titled, Resigned,” highlight’s Scott Brown’s actions following his failed reelection bid for the Senate in Massachusetts that include getting paid $1.3 million in stock from a Florida company called Global Digital Solutions (GDSI), a controversial cosmetics company turned arms manufacturer whose executives have been sued for fraud.

Massachusetts and New Hampshire AFLCIO Presidents Speak Out Against Outsourcers Scott Brown And Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney

As Outsourcing Champion Mitt Romney Campaigns With Scott Brown, Massachusetts and New Hampshire Labor Leaders Speak Out on Brown’s Outsourcing Record

Manchester, NH – Massachusetts AFL-CIO President Steven Tolman and New Hampshire AFL-CIO President Mark Mackenzie spoke out against Scott Brown’s outsourcing record today as he campaigned alongside outsourcing champion Mitt Romney. Like Romney, Scott Brown has a record of profiting off companies that ship American jobs overseas. In the Senate, Brown voted to protect tax breaks for companies that shipped jobs overseas.

“New Hampshire shouldn’t make the same mistake Massachusetts made, because Scott Brown’s record when he went to Washington proves that he’s not for working families. He’s a guy that works to protect his corporate special interest backers, at the cost of the middle class,” said Steven Tolman, President of the Massachusetts AFL-CIO. “Now we know that since losing in Massachusetts, Brown has been making hundreds of thousands of dollars off of a company that made outsourcing part of its business plan. That company, Kadant Inc., even outsourced jobs in Massachusetts, the same state he once served. Scott Brown was wrong for Massachusetts and he’s wrong for New Hampshire.”

“Outsourcing is the type of business practice that lines the pockets of people like Scott Brown and Mitt Romney, but is devastating for communities in a state like New Hampshire,” said Mark Mackenzie, President of the New Hampshire AFL-CIO. “When jobs are shipped overseas, families suffer, unemployment rates increase, and entire communities are decimated. The fact that Scott Brown personally profited from this practice is shameful. We can’t trust him and most definitely can’t afford to send his agenda back to the Senate.”

As a Senator from Massachusetts, Scott Brown voted to protect special tax breaks for companies that offshore American jobs. After leaving the Senate, he made more than a quarter million dollars by serving on the Board of Directors of Kadant, Inc., a company that outsourced American jobs to increase its bottom line. Just two days before he announced his most recent campaign in New Hampshire, Brown signed legal documents endorsing the company’s business strategy, which included establishing cheaper manufacturing facilities in China and Mexico.

The New Hampshire Democratic Party is releasing a new web ad ahead of Scott Brown’s campaign stop with fellow Massachusetts politician and notorious outsourcer, Mitt Romney. During Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, it was revealed that Mitt Romney invested millions of dollars in a company that profited off of U.S. Outsourcing. Similarly, Scott Brown has been making hundreds of thousands of dollars off an outsourcing company, even endorsing their business strategy, which included sending jobs to China and Mexico.

To view the web ad on YouTube, click here:

“Scott Brown and Mitt Romney both cashed in off of outsourcing jobs–and that’s just further proof that both are wrong for our economy and wrong for New Hampshire,” said New Hampshire Democratic Party Communications Director Julie McClain.

 

 

Granite State Rumblings: 10 Ways To Cut Poverty And Grow The Middle Class

Happy Family ( FLIKR CC David Amsler)
Happy Family ( FLIKR CC David Amsler)

Happy Family ( FLIKR CC David Amsler)

I spend a lot of time writing and working on poverty related issues and to some it may seem that I have little interest in talking about or protecting the middle class. This is not case. Issues that affect those living in poverty and policies that help move individuals out of poverty all relate to and have a direct impact on the middle class. A large and stable middle class has been central to America’s wealth and stability for decades. To help make the case, I am sharing a recent brief from Rebecca Vallas, Associate Director of the Poverty to Prosperity Program at the Center for American Progress and Melissa Boteach, Vice President of Half in Ten and the Poverty to Prosperity Program at the Center.

The Top Ten Solutions to Cut Poverty and Grow the Middle Class

The Census Bureau released its annual income, poverty, and health insurance report yesterday, revealing that four years into the economic recovery, there has been some progress in the poverty rate as it fell from 15 percent in 2012 to 14.5 percent in 2013, but there was no statistically significant improvement in the number of Americans living in poverty.
Furthermore, low- and middle-income workers have seen little to no income growth over the past decade, as the gains from economic growth have gone largely to the wealthiest Americans.

With flat incomes and inequality stuck at historically high levels, one might assume that chronic economic insecurity and an off-kilter economy are the new normal and that nothing can be done to fix it. But there is nothing normal or inevitable about elevated poverty levels and stagnant incomes. They are the direct result of policy choices that put wealth and income into the hands of a few at the expense of growing a strong middle class.

The good news is that different policy choices can bring different outcomes. When the government invests in jobs and policies to increase workers’ wages and families’ economic security, children and families see improved outcomes in both the short and long term.

Here are 10 steps Congress can take to cut poverty, boost economic security, and expand the middle class.

1. Create jobs

The best pathway out of poverty is a well-paying job. To get back to prerecession employment levels, we must create 5.6 million new jobs. At the current pace, however, we will not get there until July 2018. To kick-start job growth, the federal government should invest in job-creation strategies such as rebuilding our infrastructure; developing renewable energy sources; renovating abandoned housing; and making other common-sense investments that create jobs, revitalize neighborhoods, and boost our national economy. We should also build on proven models of subsidized employment to help the long-term unemployed and other disadvantaged workers re-enter the labor force.

In addition, the extension of federal unemployment insurance would have created 200,000 new jobs in 2014, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Indeed, every $1 in benefits that flows to jobless workers yields more than $1.50 in economic activity. Unfortunately, Congress failed to extend federal unemployment insurance at the end of 2013, leaving 1.3 million Americans and their families without this vital economic lifeline.

2. Raise the minimum wage

In the late 1960s, a full-time worker earning the minimum wage could lift a family of three out of poverty. Had the minimum wage back then been indexed to inflation, it would be $10.86 per hour today, compared to the current federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour and indexing it to inflation—as President Barack Obama and several members of Congress have called for—would lift more than 4 million Americans out of poverty. Nearly one in five children would see their parent get a raise. Recent action taken by cities and states—such as Seattle, Washington; California; Connecticut; and New Jersey—shows that boosting the minimum wage reduces poverty and increases wages.

3. Increase the Earned Income Tax Credit for childless workers

One of our nation’s most effective anti-poverty tools, the Earned Income Tax Credit, or EITC, helped more than 6.5 million Americans—including 3.3 million children—avoid poverty in 2012. It’s also an investment that pays long-term dividends. Children who receive the EITC are more likely to graduate high school and to have higher earnings in adulthood. Yet childless workers largely miss out on the benefit, as the maximum EITC for these workers is less than one-tenth that awarded to workers with two children.
President Obama and policymakers across the political spectrum have called for boosting the EITC in order to right this wrong. Importantly, this policy change should be combined with a hike in the minimum wage; one is not a substitute for the other.

4. Support pay equity

With female full-time workers earning just 78 cents for every $1 earned by men, action must be taken to ensure equal pay for equal work. Closing the gender wage gap would cut poverty in half for working women and their families and add nearly half a trillion dollars to the nation’s gross domestic product. Passing the Paycheck Fairness Act to hold employers accountable for discriminatory salary practices would be a key first step.

5. Provide paid leave and paid sick days

The United States is the only developed country in the world without paid family and medical leave and paid sick days, making it very difficult for millions of American families to balance work and family without having to sacrifice needed income. Paid leave is an important anti-poverty policy, as having a child is one of the leading causes of economic hardship. Additionally, nearly 4 in 10 private-sector workers—and 7 in 10 low-wage workers—do not have a single paid sick day, putting them in the impossible position of having to forgo needed income, or even their job, in order to care for a sick child. The Family and Medical Insurance Leave Act, or FAMILY Act, would provide paid leave protection to workers who need to take time off due to their own illness, the illness of a family member, or the birth of a child. And the Healthy Families Act would enable workers to earn up to seven job-protected sick days per year.

6. Establish work schedules that work

Low-wage and hourly jobs increasingly come with unpredictable and constantly shifting work schedules, which means workers struggle even more to balance erratic work hours with caring for their families. Ever-changing work schedules make accessing child care even more difficult than it already is and leave workers uncertain about their monthly income. Furthermore, things many of us take for granted—such as scheduling a doctor’s appointment or a parent-teacher conference at school—become herculean tasks. The Schedules That Work Act would require two weeks’ advance notice of worker schedules, which would allow employees to request needed schedule changes. It would also protect them from retaliation for making such requests—and provide guaranteed pay for cancelled or shortened shifts. These are all important first steps to make balancing work and family possible.

7. Invest in affordable, high-quality child care and early education

The lack of affordable, high-quality child care serves as a major barrier to reaching the middle class. In fact, one year of child care for an infant costs more than one year of tuition at most states’ four-year public colleges. On average, poor families who pay out of pocket for child care spend one-third of their incomes just to be able to work. Furthermore, federal child care assistance reaches only one in six eligible children.

Boosting investments in Head Start and the Child Care and Development Block Grant, as well as passing the Strong Start for America’s Children Act—which would invest in preschool, high-quality child care for infants and toddlers, and home-visiting services for pregnant women and mothers with infants—will help more struggling families obtain the child care they need in order to work and improve the future economic mobility of America’s children.

8. Expand Medicaid

Since it was signed into law in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has expanded access to high-quality, affordable health coverage for millions of Americans. However, 23 states continue to refuse to expand their Medicaid programs to cover adults up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level—making the lives of many families on the brink much harder. Expanding Medicaid would mean more than just access to health care—it would free up limited household income for other basic needs such as paying rent and putting food on the table. Having health coverage is also an important buffer against the economic consequences of illness and injury; unpaid medical bills are the leading cause of bankruptcy. Studies link Medicaid coverage not only to improved health, improved access to health care services, and lower mortality rates, but also to reduced financial strain.

9. Reform the criminal justice system and enact policies that support successful re-entry

The United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other country in the world. Today, more than 1.5 million Americans are behind bars in state and federal prisons, a figure that has increased fivefold since 1980. The impact on communities of color is particularly staggering: One in four African American children who grew up during this era of mass incarceration have had a parent incarcerated.

Mass incarceration is a key driver of poverty. When a parent is incarcerated, his or her family must find a way to make ends meet without a necessary source of income. Additionally, even a minor criminal record comes with significant collateral consequences that can serve as lifelong barriers to climbing out of poverty. For example, people with criminal records face substantial barriers to employment, housing, education, public assistance, and building good credit. More than 90 percent of employers now use background checks in hiring, and even an arrest without a conviction can prevent an individual from getting a job. The “one strike and you’re out” policy used by public housing authorities makes it difficult if not impossible for individuals with even decades-old criminal records to obtain housing, which can stand in the way of family reunification. Furthermore, a lifetime ban—for individuals with felony drug convictions—on receiving certain types of public assistance persists in more than half of U.S. states, making subsistence even more difficult for individuals seeking to regain their footing, and their families.

In addition to common-sense sentencing reform to ensure that we no longer fill our nation’s prisons with nonviolent, low-level offenders, policymakers should explore alternatives to incarceration, such as diversion programs for individuals with mental health and substance abuse challenges. We must also remove barriers to employment, housing, education, and public assistance. A decades-old criminal record should not consign an individual to a life of poverty.

10. Do no harm

The across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration—which took effect in 2013—slashed funding for programs and services that provide vital support to low-income families. Sequestration cost the U.S. economy as many as 1.6 million jobs between mid-2013 and 2014. Some relief was provided this January, when Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, but many important tools to help low-income individuals and families pave a path to the middle class—such as adult and youth education and training programs, child welfare, and community development programs—were on a downward funding trend even before sequestration took effect.

As Congress considers a continuing resolution to fund the federal government past October 1 and avoid another government shutdown, it should reject further cuts to programs and services such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, or WIC, which provides vital nutrition assistance to pregnant women and mothers with new babies. Thereafter, Congress should make permanent the important improvements made to the EITC and the Child Tax Credit as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which are set to expire in 2017. And it should avoid additional cuts to vital programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, which suffered two rounds of deep cuts in 2013 and 2014.

Conclusion

It is possible for America to dramatically cut poverty. Between 1959 and 1973, a strong economy, investments in family economic security, and new civil rights protections helped cut the U.S. poverty rate in half. Investments in nutrition assistance have improved educational attainment, earnings, and income among the young girls who were some of the food stamp program’s first recipients. Expansions of public health insurance have lowered infant mortality rates and reduced the incidence of low birth rates. In more recent history, states that raised the minimum wage have illustrated the important role that policy plays in combating wage stagnation.

There is nothing inevitable about poverty. We just need to build the political will to enact the policies that will increase economic security, expand opportunities, and grow the middle class.

GROWING UP GRANITE

The NH Center for Public Policy Studies recently released their report, “What is New Hampshire?” 2014 Edition. Here is just a small piece of the report and here is where to go find and read the rest of it!

New Hampshire is navigating a series of shifting economic, demographic, social and political forces. Among the new trends shaping the state into the 21st Century: an aging population; increasing racial and ethnic diversity; a shift away from the high-growth economic model of the past; and continued demand on the state budget for public services. While the implications of these and other challenges are still unclear, they do raise critical policy questions explored in this report.

Throughout its history, New Hampshire has worn many identities: agricultural outpost on the edge of New England; bustling engine of the Industrial Revolution; oasis for nature-seeking tourists; haven for tax-fleeing transplants. In the early years of the 21st Century, New Hampshire is still evolving amid shifting economic, demographic, social and political forces.

Among the new trends shaping the “new” New Hampshire: an aging population; increasing racial and ethnic diversity; a shift away from the high-growth economic model of the past; and continued demand on the state budget for public services

While the implications of these and other challenges are still unclear, they do raise critical policy questions, including:

  • Economy: New Hampshire suffered the effects of the Great Recession less severely than many other states, but slow job growth continues to gnaw at the state’s economy. As of the summer of 2014, New Hampshire lagged behind the nation and the rest of New England in recovering jobs lost during the recession. What is the state’s economic development plan, especially in relation to demographic trends that show New Hampshire’s population growth slowing in coming years? What specific industries or regions of New Hampshire will help shape the state’s economy in coming years? What regional approaches to economic development will find greatest success?
  • Demographic change: While New Hampshire is consistently rated one of the best places in the country to raise children, our population as a whole continues to age. Meanwhile, our school enrollment continues on a decade-long decline, and several measures of youth well-being in the state show worrisome trends, including rising levels of childhood poverty. What are the implications of these developments on education policy, housing, public services and transportation?
  • Health care: New Hampshire’s health policy landscape faces great uncertainty amid recent reforms at the national level, as well as continued rises in cost and the continued aging of the state’s population. What impact will the shifting health marketplace have on New Hampshire’s economy and the well-being of its residents?
  • Long-term planning: State policymakers face a long list of critical issues in coming years: public infrastructure investment, education finance, corrections spending, health care, and energy policy, among others. Many of these require a long-term perspective and an understanding of multi-year trends. How will the state – which has a two-year budget cycle and a two-year term for all major state offices – manage to plan decades into the future?

This report is our annual survey of the major policy issues and critical questions shaping our future. The data explain where New Hampshire has been, forecast where it is heading, and explore how current trends and policy choices facing the state will affect the well-being of its citizens.

Jeanne Shaheen Continues “New Hampshire Jobs First” Tour at White Mountain Lumber in Berlin

Jeanne Shaheen 3

Shaheen Highlights Contrast Between Her Record of Supporting North Country Jobs And Scott Brown’s Record Supporting Companies that Outsource

Today, Senator Jeanne Shaheen visited White Mountain Lumber in Berlin, where she continued her “New Hampshire Jobs First” tour highlighting her work supporting North Country jobs in contrast with Scott Brown’s support for outsourcing policies and companies that ship jobs overseas. White Mountain Lumber has created good paying jobs in New Hampshire’s North Country and epitomizes the types of New Hampshire businesses Jeanne Shaheen has always stood up for in the Senate.

“Scott Brown and I have very different records when it comes to supporting job creation and standing up for local businesses here in New Hampshire,” said Senator Shaheen. “Scott Brown voted against the Small Business Jobs Act — against tax cuts for the New Hampshire small businesses that create jobs here. But Scott Brown did vote for tax breaks for companies shipping jobs overseas to places like China and Mexico, and now he’s cashing in by serving on the board of company that outsourced jobs to increase its bottom line. That’s wrong.”

“For me, New Hampshire always comes first. For the North Country, I’ve worked across the aisle to promote job creation – including when I worked to get the Berlin Prison open, which has created jobs and helped the economy. I’ve worked hard to protect our state’s natural beauty and promote our tourism industry, which is our state’s second largest. And I’ll always support smart policies like the Small Business Jobs Act which helped countless New Hampshire small businesses grow and create jobs.”

In the Senate, Scott Brown opposed the Small Business Jobs Act but supported special tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas. Brown continues to serve on the board of the company Kadant Inc., which offshored American jobs to China and Mexico to increase its bottom line. As a Kadant board member, Brown has made more than a quarter million dollars since February of 2013 and signed documents endorsing the company’s outsourcing strategy just two days before he declared his run for the Senate in New Hampshire. Meanwhile, New Hampshire has lost the highest percentage of jobs to China than any other state in the nation.

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