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Students To Hold ‘UNH Solidarity Rally for Lecturers’ After University Lays off 18 Lecturers

In a very quiet announcement, the administrators at the University of New Hampshire sent a letter to 18 lecturers informing them that their contracts would not be renewed for next year.

On January 19th, the Union Leader reported on the story.

“The contracts of 18 lecturers in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of New Hampshire were not renewed, and one affected man says he’s heartbroken after receiving the news in the mail over winter break.

English lecturer Nathan Webster, of Stratham, a veteran who served during Operation Desert Storm and then worked as a photojournalist in Iraq, teaches first-year writing and introduction to creative nonfiction, he said.
“I’m the only war veteran in the English Department, and the letter I got (just a letter, no call, no personal contact at all) was dismissive and blunt and the reasons given are contradictory and unclear,” Webster said via email Friday.
“The letter claimed a severe budget shortfall but a new announcement said it was to enhance program strength by ensuring the highest degree in the field,” he wrote.
A copy of the letter Webster received this week from Dean Heidi Bostic said his employment ends May 18.

“The reason for this non-renewal is that the College of Liberal Arts is currently confronted with a substantial deficit,” Bostic wrote. “With future programmatic needs forecast in mind, we have been forced to make some painful reductions and strategic realignments in teaching faculty.””

Within a week of the non-renewals being sent out, the UNH Lectures Branch of the American Association on University Professors (AAUP) sent a letter to Dean Bostic requesting details on why the lecturers were not renewed.

Dear Dean Bostic,

The recently announced cuts of Lecturer faculty were dramatic and unanticipated.  Many of us across the University have questions about this decision, and we write to you now to ask you to provide more information to the community about these cuts.

In particular, we request the Deans’ office address:

  • The College financial situation.  We call on you to provide specific details about the COLA finances.  Detailed financial reports for the college would allow for the transparency needed to understand the context of recent cuts to the teaching faculty.
  • An articulated plan for how the more than 100 sections of courses taught by the non-renewed faculty members will be covered.  We request you address the following questions: Will COLA be reducing the number of classes?  Will upper-level classes be eliminated? Will faculty teaching those upper-level classes be moved into lower-level courses?  Is the intention to renegotiate faculty workloads or to hire more faculty?  Cuts to teaching faculty compromise programs, as well as students’ experiences and opportunities; therefore, your plan here is a matter of concern for all community stakeholders.
  • The otherwise unannounced and unexplained new requirement for Lecturer Faculty to possess the terminal degree of a PhD. Your January 19 email stated that the affected faculty “were not renewed as the result of a desire to enhance program strength by ensuring that faculty members have the highest terminal degree in their field.”  We request explanation for why this criterion is cited now, when it has never been a factor of the hiring, review or renewal of these faculty. As you are aware, many of these faculty members were repeatedly reappointed on the basis of their teaching experience and performance in the classroom. In addition, these lecturers have been reviewed by your office as meeting or exceeding your expectations annually. Further, seven of the affected faculty had been promoted to the ranks of Senior or Principal Lecturer, and their degrees did not play a role in these promotion decisions.  How does your own recent assessment and promotion of these teachers connect with the notion that they are suddenly unqualified? We request explanation for the logic and soundness of this new criterion.
    These are among the many questions raised by the recent cuts of Lecturer Faculty.  We call on you to provide answers.

Sincerely,

UNHLU-AAUP Executive Committee


Now the students are rallying behind the educators.  

The student groups, Humans of UNH and UNH Young Democratic Socialists of America, are teaming up to hold a rally on Friday Feb 16th,  in support of reinstating these educators.

The University of New Hampshire has just made significant cuts to lecturer positions in several departments in the College of Liberal Arts. Cuts to lecturer positions will directly affect the quality of education at the University as well as the course options available to students. Students at UNH should expect to have access to a wide-range of courses that will prepare them to succeed in an increasingly global economy.

Long-serving and committed lecturers in French, Spanish, Arabic, ESL, English, History, and Political Science have been informed that their contracts will not be renewed.

Stand in solidarity with affected lecturers and UNH employees. Come and listen to the testimonies of students and alumni directly affected by the recent lecturer cuts.

Join them if you can.

UNH Solidarity Rally for Lecturers

Friday, 16 February 2018 11:00 am

@ Murkland Hall

Creator: Humans of UNH

Disability Advocates Speak Out Against The GOP Tax Scam

Granite Staters return to New Hampshire and tell their stories after risking arrest in Washington D.C. protesting the GOP Tax Bill 

A delegation of Granite State disability rights and health care advocates who traveled to Washington, DC this week to protest the damaging Senate bill that guts Medicaid and Medicare for working families to fund massive tax breaks for the rich and corporations held a press briefing about the bill and their participation in a large-scale protest this week in the nation’s capital – which in some cases, included being arrested –  in Concord yesterday.

In a fast-tracked process that required Senators to vote on a 500-page draft bill with notes still in the margins, Senate Republicans passed a tax giveaway to the very wealthy and big corporations that will pave the way for massive Medicaid and Medicare cuts, strip 13 million Americans of health care coverage and increase insurance premiums by 10 percent for millions more. Millions of people with disabilities and seniors, working families, and children will be stuck with the bill and cuts to critical services and basic human rights all so the rich can get richer. Governor Chris Sununu has praised the bill as a “net positive.” 

The press conference highlighted the actual impact on middle and lower income Granite Staters and share the personal stories of those who traveled to Washington DC to protest it.

“I traveled to Washington D.C. to protest this bill because I know this bill will hurt the people who can least afford to be hurt, the struggling middle class and the working poor,” said Melissa Hinebauch, Human Rights Co-Chair of the Kent Street Coalition. The mother of three spoke out against the GOP Tax Bill highlighting the harm working families will suffer under the proposal.

Hinebauch also spoke about how the bill will add over $1 trillion dollars to the national debt while Senator Orin Hatch said “we no longer have the money” to fund essential programs like the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). “This tax bill is just mean and heartless.”

Video of Melissa Hinebauch

“People with disabilities will be the hardest hit by this tax bill for the wealthy,” said Forrest Beaudoin-Friede a member of ABLE-NH who traveled also traveled to Washington D.C. to protest this GOP tax bill.  “This tax bill takes away tax credits that help small businesses become ADA (Americans with Disabilities) compliant. This credit is equal to half of their expenses above $250 dollars. This effectively raises taxes on small businesses who want to open their doors to both customers and workers with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations.”

“This bill will force cuts to Medicaid that will harm people with disabilities, like me, and some will die,” Beaudoin-Friede stated.

Eddie Gomez went to Washington to speak out against this tax bill on behalf of his seven year old nephew who suffers from the genetic disease, Muscular Dystrophy.   The program that helps Gomez’s sister, a single parent, is funded through charitable donations and receives no federal funding.

“This tax bill eliminates deductions for charitable contributions and discourages charitable giving while threatening enormous cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. How will my sister be able to afford the care for my nephew on a lower-middle class income?” asked Gomez.

Gomez explained that over 8 million working families used the medical device deduction, that would be eliminated under the GOP tax plan, to help offset the costs of high priced equipment and medical expenses.

Video of Forrest Beaudoin-Friede and Eddie Gomez members of ABLE-NH

“We are fighting against this ‘Reverse Robin Hood’ tax bill” said Lisa Beaudoin, Executive Director of ABLE NH.  This tax bill makes “deep cuts to a whole range of programs that are critical to people with disabilities.”

“This tax bill will be a slow death sentence to people with developmental disabilities,” she added.

Video of  Lisa Beaudoin, Executive Director of ABLE NH

This bill will cause “13 million people to lose their healthcare and increase the premiums of millions more,” said Zandra Rice-Hawkins, Executive Director of Granite State Progress.

The GOP Tax Bill passed the senate in a 51-49 party line vote and now moves to a committee of conference to hash out differences between the House and Senate versions of the bill.

Rep Kuster Explains How Trump’s Budget Cuts Hurt Students At Keene State

Kuster Discusses President’s Proposed Budget Cuts to Higher Education Affordability with Students, Higher Education Leaders at Keene State College 

(Keene, NH)- Today, Congresswoman Annie Kuster (NH-02) joined Granite State students and higher education leaders at Keene State College to discuss President Trump’s proposed budget cuts and their impact on higher education. Kuster heard directly from students and education stakeholders on how the President’s proposed budget reductions to critical higher education programs would impact access and affordability for students across New Hampshire.

“Access to quality, affordable higher education is one of the best ways to provide opportunity for our young people and maintain our state’s economic competitiveness,”said Congresswoman Kuster. “The budget proposed by President Trump would decimate critical financial aid programs and be a disaster for Granite Staters who want to pursue higher education. Our young people deserve the opportunity to access the educational opportunities that will help them achieve their goals, which is why I’m pushing legislation to increase financial support and address the costs of education. I will continue to advocate for policies that expand access to education and skills training programs and against President Trump’s harmful cuts.”

“Keene State College is pleased to host this important conversation about the need to keep the cost of college affordable,” said Dr. Melinda Treadwell, President of Keene State College. “As the state’s only public liberal arts college, we are guided by our mission to provide a high quality educational experience that is both accessible and affordable. We deeply appreciate Congresswoman Kuster’s leadership in this area and in other matters of importance to higher education here in New Hampshire and across the country.”

“I welcome the opportunity to join with our counterparts at Keene State to share key insights and information with Congresswoman Kuster,” said Dr. Kim Mooney, President of Franklin Pierce University. “I am encouraged by her interest in talking with us and with our students as budget cuts loom on the horizon that could have a deeply negative impact on our state and our country. New Hampshire has a long tradition of public and private colleges and universities collaborating around common higher-education issues and challenges in the best interests of our students and for the good of our state.”

Congresswoman Kuster has been a strong advocate in promoting college affordability during her time in Congress. She is currently supporting legislation to strengthen and expand Pell Grants through the Affordability for Constant and Continual Education to Enhance Student Success Act and the Year-Round Pell Grant Restoration Act. She has supported the Perkins Loan Program and funding for Pell Grants through her role as a member of the Higher Education Caucus.  This spring, Kuster helped reintroduce the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act to allow students to refinance their student loans at lower interest rates.

Kuster has also worked to expand access to community college and job training programs for Granite Staters. Earlier this year, she introduced her Workforce Development Investment Act, which would create tax incentives to encourage companies to partner with education providers to develop workforce training programs for skills that are in demand within their community or region. It would also create a separate credit for the cost of direct training conducted as part of an educational partnership or licensed apprenticeship.

Kuster was joined at today’s discussion by Dr. Melinda Treadwell, President of Keene State College; Dr. Kim Mooney, President of Franklin Pierce University; Steve Goetsch, Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management and Director of Student Financial Aid at Keene State College; Ken Ferreira, Associate Vice President of Student Financial Services at Franklin Pierce University; Debby Scire, Executive Director of Campus Compact for New Hampshire; Tori Berube, Vice President for College Planning and Engagement at New Hampshire Higher Education Assistance Foundation (NHHEAF); Jay Kahn, State Senator for New Hampshire District 10; Bailey St. Laurent, resident of Chicester and student at Keene State College; Luke Parkhurst, Littleton resident and student at Franklin Pierce University; and local students and higher education leaders, among others.

EPA Union Blasts Pruitt Over Budget Testimony

AFGE says Administration’s proposed budget will hurt community health across the country

WASHINGTON – In response to today’s testimony from Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt about the proposed budget for the agency in 2018, American Federation of Government Employees National President J. David Cox Sr. issued the following statement:

“More than 40 years ago, President Richard Nixon created the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the land we live on. It was a critical moment as local and state governments didn’t — and still do not — have the capacity, incentive, or resources to address issues like cross-state pollution. And for the last four decades, working people at the EPA have dedicated their lives to fulfilling the agency’s mission, and protecting community health in this country.

“It is absolutely outrageous to me that Administrator Pruitt supports a 31 percent cut to the EPA. It’s the only agency that keeps America’s air clean and drinking water safe. How can he think that reducing more than 20 percent of the agency’s workforce, cutting essential programs, and rolling back regulations will help citizens of this country?

“Administrator Pruitt and the President want the American people to think that these cuts – and the rollbacks of life-saving regulations – are good for our country. They’re not. Study after study has proven that regulations put forth by the EPA have saved lives and money, and have actually spurred innovation and created jobs.

“For example, the Office of Management and Budget found that from 2000 – 2010, regulations cost between $44 – $66 billion annually. Comparatively, those very same regulations had an annual benefit ranging up to $651 billion.

“Working people at the EPA take no sides when it comes to politics. They only want to follow through on their agency’s mission. They’ve dedicated their careers to making sure we all have air and water that is free of dangerous pollutants.

“If we want to continue to protect generations of Americans from air- and water-borne illnesses, we must fight against the President’s 2018 budget, and save the EPA.”

At Coos County Nursing Hospital, Senator Hassan Highlights Importance of Protecting Medicaid For Seniors


Senator Hassan greeted Granite Staters at Coos County Nursing Hospital.

WEST STEWARTSTOWN – Today, Senator Maggie Hassan visited the Coos County Nursing Hospital, touring the facility and highlighting the importance of preventing the devastating cuts to Medicaid included in Trumpcare and the President’s budget proposal. Medicaid is the primary payer of long-term services and supports, which includes nursing home services. Thousands of Granite Staters in nursing homes rely on Medicaid for nursing home services.

“Nursing homes like Coos County Nursing Hospital help ensure that our seniors have the care and support they need, and the majority of funding for such nursing homes comes from Medicaid,” Senator Hassan said.

“Unfortunately, through Trumpcare and a senseless budget proposal, the Trump Administration is focused on slashing Medicaid in order to pay for tax cuts for the wealthy while threatening the health and well-being of thousands of seniors in the Granite State and across the nation,” added Senator Hassan. “I will continue standing up against these dangerous cuts to Medicaid that would pull us backward, and fight to ensure that all of our older citizens have the support necessary to remain active in our society.”

​Trumpcare would cut more than $800 million in 10 years and the Trump budget would make another $610 million in cuts. These cuts would force states to make dramatic reductions in who they serve and what services they cover, threatening health care for millions, including the care our nation’s seniors receive in nursing homes.

In New Hampshire, close to 64% of nursing home patients rely on Medicaid for their care. The American Health Care Act, also known as Trumpcare, cuts and caps Medicaid, slashing $834 billion from the program over the next decade. On top of that, President Trump’s budget proposal includes cutting an additional $610 billion in Medicaid funding.

As a member of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Senator Hassan is focused on strengthening the health and well-being of older citizens in New Hampshire, including cosponsoring legislation to lower the cost of prescription drugs for seniors.

Leo W Gerard: Trump’s Budget Slashes Opportunity

A few hundred billion cut here, a few hundred billion slashed there, and the Trump budget proposal released this week adds up to real crushed opportunity.

Image From Getty Images

The spending plan slices a pound of flesh from everyone, well, everyone who isn’t a millionaire or billionaire. For the rich, it promises massive tax breaks.

There are cuts to worker safety programs, veterans’ programs, Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps, vocational training, public education, environmental protection, health research and more. So much more. The list is shockingly long.

Each incision is painful. But what’s worse is the collective result: the annihilation of opportunity. The rich can buy opportunity. The rest cannot. What was always special about America was its guarantee of opportunity to everyone. All who worked hard and pulled themselves up by their  bootstraps could earn their own picket-fenced home. This budget terminates the goal of opportunity for all. It declares that the people of the United States no longer will help provide boots to those who lost jobs because of NAFTA, the residents of economically depressed regions, the children of single mothers, the sufferers of chronic diseases, the victims of natural disasters. No bootstraps for them. Just for the rich who hire servants to pull the straps on their fancy $1,500 Gucci footwear.

The minimum-wage servant class doesn’t have a prayer under this budget. Trump condemns them to a perpetual prison of poverty. His budget denies them, and even their children, the chance to rise. It treats no better the precarious middle class and workers whose jobs are threatened by imports. It even screws veterans.

Achieving the American Dream depends on a good education, and the Trump budget would extinguish that possibility for tens of millions. The breadth and depth of the cuts to public education are gobsmacking. They’ll enable billionaire Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to use the money instead to subsidize private school tuition for the Gucci class.

While DeVos helps the already-rich attend pricey private schools, she and Trump would cut $345.9 billion from public education, training, employment and social services. That includes $71.5 billion from public elementary, secondary and vocational education. They’d take $11.4  billion from education for disadvantaged children and $13.9 billion from special-needs children.

They’d withdraw $183.3 billion from higher education including $33 billion from financial assistance. They say to kids who failed to be born to wealthy parents – too bad for you, no low-interest student loans for brilliant poor students and far fewer grants for the talented who could cure cancer if only they could afford college tuition.

Many of these aspiring students can’t turn to their parents for help because they’ve lost jobs as manufacturers like Rexnord and Carrier closed American factories and shipped jobs to Mexico or China. Trump and DeVos would also decimate help for the parents to get back on their feet, eliminating $25.2 billion for training and employment.

If the parents’ unemployment insurance runs out as they search for new jobs and their cars are repossessed, mass transit may not be an option for commuting to new positions. Trump would cut it by $41.6 billion.

If a furloughed worker in North Dakota or Minnesota or Pennsylvania can’t afford to pay the heating bill, Trump’s government would no longer help. He would eliminate entirely the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, ending aid that can mean the difference between life and freezing to death for 6 million vulnerable Americans.

If laid-off workers ultimately also lose their homes to foreclosure, Trump is unsympathetic. He’d cut $77.2 billion from housing assistance. His advice: take your bootless feet and live in the street.

And don’t expect any government cheese once there. Trump would carve $193.6 billion out of food stamps. He doesn’t even spare infants, with an $11.1 billion smack to the program that feeds pregnant women and their babies. School kids can’t expect food either. Trump and DeVos say too bad for them if they can’t hear their teachers over their growling stomachs. Trump takes nearly 21 percent away from the Agriculture Department, which subsidizes school lunches for low-income kids.

Trump also stiffs families that lose their health insurance because they can’t afford COBRA premiums after a job loss or can’t find new employment before their COBRA eligibility expires. Trump slashes $627 billion from Medicaid, and that’s on top of draconian cuts in his so-called health plan that would cost 14 million Americans their insurance coverage next year and 23 million over 10 years. Trump says: no health care for the down and out.

For the residents of West Virginia glens with closed coal mines, and the citizens of shuttered mill towns in Western Pennsylvania and the in habitants of Michigan municipalities struck down by offshored auto manufacturing jobs, Trump would purge $41.3 billion from the community development program that provides both jobs and otherwise unaffordable crucial municipal improvements.

The unemployed or under-employed who hoped for jobs in Trump’s promised $1 trillion infrastructure program receive no reprieve in this proposed spending plan. It removes $97.2 billion from airports, $123.4 billion from ground transportation and $16.3 billion from water transportation projects.

Trump is mulling sending thousands of new troops to Afghanistan, and for some young people with few options, that service is attractive because it comes with good medical and education benefits. But the Trump budget diminishes that chance at success as well, ripping $154.1 billion from veterans’ services including $94.4 billion from hospital and medical care and $511 million from veterans’ education and training.

For young people who thought the AmeriCorps program might be an employment substitute for the military, no luck. Trump’s spending plan abolishes that service program.

Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget redefines America.  No longer the land of opportunity, it would be a place of welfare for the rich in the form of million-dollar tax breaks and subsidies for exclusive private schools. For the rest, hope would be extinguished. For them, Trump’s budget would convert America the beautiful into America the hellish hole.

Senator Hassan Calls Medicaid Cuts “Devastating” To NH Schools

Senator Hassan Highlights Devastating Impact Medicaid Cuts Would Have on Students with Disabilities & School Districts across New Hampshire

WASHINGTON – Today, Senator Maggie Hassan held a press call to highlight the devastating impact Medicaid cuts would have on students who experience disabilities and school districts across New Hampshire.

“Countless children who experience disabilities in New Hampshire are able to go to school and participate in their communities because of the Medicaid program, but under major proposals being floated in Congress, New Hampshire school districts stand to lose a minimum of $8.7 million in Medicaid funding,” Senator Hassan said. “We cannot go back to the days where we marginalized or don’t assist some of our most vulnerable students, and I will continue fighting against these senseless cuts to ensure that every student – regardless of their personal circumstances – has the support they need.”

On the call, Senator Hassan was joined by Dr. Carl Ladd of the New Hampshire School Administrators Association and Mike Skibbie of the Disability Rights Center, both of whom expressed extreme concern for what cuts to Medicaid would mean for students disabilities, as well as school districts who would have to make up for lost funding by cutting other critical programs that help students succeed.

“By covering medical support services for students who experience disabilities, Medicaid has been integral in helping school districts comply with IDEA requirements and fulfilling our obligation to Granite State students who experience disabilities,” said Dr. Carl Ladd, Executive Director of the New Hampshire School Administrators Association. “If schools lose funding from Medicaid, districts would face huge budget shortages and could be forced to cut access to behavioral health services, health screenings, and school nurses that countless students depend upon.”

“At the Disability Rights Center, we focus on eliminating barriers so that people with disabilities can live meaningful and fulfilling lives,” said Mike Skibbie, Policy Director of the Disability Rights Center New Hampshire. “As part of those efforts, we have fought to ensure that young people who experience disabilities have access to a quality public education…Medicaid funding to school districts is a very important part of making that access possible, providing support to students with disabilities so that they can be fully integrated into the classroom and succeed just like their peers.”

Last year, New Hampshire schools received $29 million in Medicaid funding. Analysis based on methodology from The School Superintendents Association, shows that under major proposals being considered in Congress, local New Hampshire school districts stand to lose a minimum of $8.7 million – and that number could grow significantly (click here for a district-by-district breakdown). Trumpcare also specifically targets special education with a provision declaring that states would no longer have to consider schools eligible Medicaid providers

Superintendents across New Hampshire have also spoken out about what the proposed cuts to Medicaid would mean for their schools and the quality of education they strive to provide all Granite State students:

Concord Superintendent Terri Forsten:

“Concord School District stands to lose more than $350,000 in Medicaid funding, which would be absolutely devastating for our students who experience disabilities and to the quality of education we strive to provide all of our students. Slashing Medicaid would force us to cut other critical programs in our already squeezed school budget. I urge the Trump Administration to reconsider cutting so much funding from a program that has helped countless students succeed and be fully included into their classrooms. This reduction in revenue would impact our plans to create a 21st century learning facility for our middle school students. These kinds of cuts inappropriately pit the necessity of funding special education programs against other community priorities when we should be working together to do what is best for all students.”

Berlin Superintendent Corinne Cascadden:

“I am deeply troubled that our school district could lose at least $100,000 in Medicaid funding under proposals we have seen in Washington. Medicaid funding has helped our students who experience disabilities become fully integrated members of their classrooms. Berlin currently has 24% of its students identified with disabilities, a much greater percentage than the state average. To make up for such a dramatic loss in funding from Medicaid, other school programs will need to be eliminated to meet the needs of students. Locally, the tax payers cannot bear the loss with an already high property tax rate $39.97 per 1000 and a high senior citizen population on fixed incomes to meet the deficit. I am deeply worried that the education of our students will suffer, and hope that the Trump Administration changes course before taking these steps that would hurt so many of our young people.”

Kuster Denounces President Trump’s Cuts That Will Hurt Rural New Hampshire, Most Vulnerable

 

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), Community Development Block Grants, and the Northern Border Regional are all slated for elimination in President Trumps FY 2018 Budget

(Washington, DC) – Yesterday, the Trump Administration released its FY 2018 budget which includes the complete elimination of the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), and the Northern Border Regional Commission. Congresswoman Annie Kuster (NH-02) expressed her serious concern about the impact of the elimination of these programs on vulnerable New Hampshire populations and economic development in rural parts of the state.

“It’s unconscionable that President Trump would single out programs for elimination that are so important to the most vulnerable Granite Staters and Americans,” said Congresswoman Kuster. “The complete elimination of the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program is particularly egregious and will harm low-income seniors and families who rely on this lifeline during the cold winter months.”

The budget proposed by President Trump would:

  • Eliminate the Community Development Block Grant Program
  • CDBG provided $9,208,375 to New Hampshire in 2015 to support affordable housing, spur economic development, and create jobs
  • Eliminate the Northern Border Regional Commission
  • New Hampshire received $1,800,000 in 2016, which leveraged $19,557,067 in private investment
  • Included funds for the Groveton Mill redevelopment, the Littleton Riverwalk and other economic development projects in New Hampshire’s North Country and other economically challenged areas
  • Eliminate the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
  • LIHEAP provided $25,749,807 in 2015 to help Granite State seniors and families stay warm during the winter

Kuster continued, “We’ve seen the success of programs like the Northern Border Regional Commission and Community Development Block Grants in spurring economic development programs throughout our state and in particular rural parts of New Hampshire. The last thing we should be doing is eliminating effective programs that create jobs and boost our economic competitiveness. I intend to oppose these misguided cuts and will fight for programs important to New Hampshire’s residents and economy.”

 

AFGE Union Says: Trump Budget Cuts Civil Service Pay, Jobs, And Benefits To Line CEO Pockets

Trump budget cuts civil service pay, jobs, and benefits to line CEO pockets, union says

Budget delivers huge tax breaks to CEOs and wealthy on backs of federal workers

WASHINGTON – President Trump’s budget funds huge tax breaks for corporations and the wealthiest Americans by slashing take-home pay, benefits, and jobs for the civil servants who care for our veterans, guard our borders, support our military, and ensure our health, the head of the largest federal employee union said today.

Federal workers would be forced to pay more toward their retirement – amounting to a six-percent pay cut – and would see those retirement benefits shrink through a change in how benefits are calculated and the elimination of annual cost-of-living adjustments.

“Thanks to years of pay freezes, meager wage hikes, and mandatory increases in retirement, federal employees earn 6.5 percent less today than they did at the start of the decade when adjusted for inflation,” Cox said. “President Trump’s budget continues this race to the bottom by penalizing the working-class people who serve and protect their fellow Americans.”

WATCH NOW: President Cox delivers a reality check on President Trump’s budget

 

 

Specifically, the budget would:

  • Increase current workers’ out-of-pocket payments toward their pensions by about 6 percent, not including payments they already make into the Thrift Savings Plan and Social Security.
  • Reduce future pension benefits by averaging an employee’s highest five years of salary, instead of the highest three years.
  • Eliminate annual cost-of-living adjustments for current and future employees under the Federal Employees Retirement System, and cut the COLA for employees under the older Civil Service Retirement System by 0.5 percent from the current formula.
  • Eliminate supplemental payments to employees who retire before age 62, such as law enforcement agents and firefighters.

“This budget rips away any sense of financial security that federal workers currently have and shows how little regard this administration has for the everyday Americans who keep our government running,” Cox said.

The retirement cuts total about $117 billion over a decade, which would be on top of $182 billion in cuts to federal employee pay and benefits since 2010. Federal employees also are at risk by budget proposals that would eliminate subsidized student loans and end student debt forgiveness for those who enter public service.

The budget also proposes eliminating thousands of current jobs, with significant cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency and the Agriculture, Interior, and Treasury departments.

“The federal government has roughly the same number of workers today as it did when Dwight Eisenhower was president, serving a population that has doubled in size,” Cox said. “Federal employees do a tremendous job serving the public with limited resources and little appreciation. Unfortunately, this budget stacks the deck against them by cutting their jobs, wages, and benefits – all to benefit Wall Street executives and the wealthy elite.”

CWA: Working People Will Fight Against Shameful Trump Budget

Following is a statement by CWA President Chris Shelton on the budget released today by the Trump Administration:

“President Trump’s budget is a slap in the face to millions of people who voted for him based on the promises he made on the campaign trail. During the election, Trump visited struggling communities and vowed to preserve and strengthen Medicare and Social Security. His first budget proposal shows that the promise was an outright lie.”

“The Trump budget takes a hatchet to Medicaid, Social Security disability benefits, food assistance for older Americans, food stamps, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), cutting these and other programs by more than $1.7 trillion in order to give an enormous tax cut to the wealthiest.”

“This budget is shameful. Millions of Americans would face draconian cuts to programs that help them with basic needs while billionaires pad their bank accounts with new tax breaks.”

“President Trump, contrary to his campaign promises, has put the concerns and interests of working families dead last. We’re putting Members of Congress on notice: working people will fight back against this vicious budget that targets average Americans in order to give a big handout to the top 1%.”

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