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NH’s Congressional Representatives Decry Trump’s Decision To End DACA

Today, it was announced that President Trump will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) that protects 800,000 undocumented immigrants who came to this country as children.

“President Trump’s decision to end DACA is cruel, inhumane and completely unnecessary,” said Senator Jeanne Shaheen. “This decision drives hundreds of innocent Dreamers in the Granite State, and hundreds of thousands across the country, into the shadows of our society. I’m encouraged that several Republicans, including Speaker Ryan, have voiced their support for legislative action to continue DACA. Congress should immediately get to work on a bipartisan plan that protects Dreamers.”

“This decision is morally wrong and cruel. It also would hurt our economy, which is why a wide range of American businesses are speaking out,” said Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter. “I agree with Speaker Paul Ryan: decisions about the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program should be made by Congress. These are young people who were brought to the United States as children through no fault of their own. They are showing their dedication and commitment to our country by pursuing higher education, working in our communities, or serving our nation. Penalizing the 966 New Hampshire young people who take part in this program is harmful to our local economies and denies these students, workers, and veterans the opportunity to strengthen the communities they grew up in.”

“Immigration enforcement should focus on people who are criminals and threats to public safety, not young people who often have no significant connections to the countries of their births, and whose energy, hard work and innovation are vital components of our economic future,” said Senator Maggie Hassan. “President Trump’s decision to go back on his word to protect these young people is harmful and wrong. I strongly support the bipartisan DREAM Act and previously joined my colleagues in urging President Trump to protect these young people who have great potential to continue contributing to our society and economy. Members of both parties have expressed support for continuing this program, and I urge my colleagues to come together across party lines immediately to support these young people.”

“I’m deeply disappointed by President Trump’s decision to end DACA, which allows people brought to the United States as children the opportunity to work legally and live without fear of deportation,” said Congresswoman Annie Kuster. “The young people protected by DACA are contributing to our nation in countless ways: they are serving in our military, paying taxes, and helping to create jobs and grow our economy. Diversity strengthens our fabric as a nation and this ill-advised decision is nothing more than political pandering that will hurt real people and families. Congress must act as soon as possible to reform our broken immigration system and extend protections to Dreamers across the country, including the hundreds in New Hampshire.”

Last week, a group of business leaders sent an open letter to President Trump expressing their opposition to ending DACA. In the letter the groups writes, “All DACA recipients grew up in America, registered with our government, submitted to extensive background checks, and are diligently giving back to our communities and paying income taxes. More than 97 percent are in school or in the workforce, 5 percent started their own business, 65 percent have purchased a vehicle, and 16 percent have purchased their first home. At least 72 percent of the top 25 Fortune 500 companies count DACA recipients among their employees.

The letter continued, “Unless we act now to preserve the DACA program, all 780,000 hardworking young people will lose their ability to work legally in this country, and every one of them will be at immediate risk of deportation. Our economy would lose $460.3 billion from the national GDP and $24.6 billion in Social Security and Medicare tax contributions.”

“DREAMers, many of whom are still children, are a part of our American family,” said NH Democratic Party Chair Ray Buckley.  “Today, the Trump administration kicked this hardworking, inspiring group out of our shared home. So many DREAMers know no other country, flag or allegiance and came here through no fault of their own. DACA is simply a chance for DREAMers to work hard and stay in the country they deservedly call their own. Today’s decision by the Trump administration and the way in which they handled it are vindictive, cowardly, counterproductive and wrong-headed. It’s not how we’ve ever behaved in America and it is hypocritical for a country founded by, built by, and prosperous because of immigrants.”

The people at United We Dream put out a guide about what this new news means for Dreamers.

Labor Day 2017: Remembering All That Labor Has Done For America

New York Labor Parade 1882

“Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.”
Department of Labor, History of Labor Day

Today, we celebrate Labor Day: A day to honor all that the labor movement has done to help working people. Over the past 140 years, labor unions have fought and died to improve the working conditions and the lives of all workers.  Without labor unions we would not have things like weekends, vacations, retirement plans, and overtime.

It was also the labor movement that help to bring forth major social and economic changes like the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Civil Rights Act, the Equal Pay Act of 1963 & 2011, Social Security, and the Age Discrimination Act.  These are just of the dozens of laws that were proposed, pushed through, and ultimately passed with major help from labor unions.

Today, as was done in the first Labor Day parade in 1882, I will proudly march down main street flanked by my union brothers and sisters.  A smiling and waving reminder of all that labor has done for working people.

Some say the unions have become obsolete. They say that unions did a lot of good but we now have laws to protect us and that unions are no longer needed.

I say that could not be farther from the truth.

Yes, we have workplace safety protections and laws governed by OSHA, a program that unions helped to create, but every year politicians attack OSHA.  They slashed OSHA’s budget and told us that “industry” can regulate themselves.  The entire reason OSHA was created was because greedy corporate executives could not “regulate themselves” and put profits over the health and safety of their employees.

Even with OSHA, workers are still pushed to bend or outright break these safety regulations.  In 2016, OSHA sent out over 35,000 violations.  Failure to abide by fall protection regulations is once again at the top of the list with over 6,900 citations issued.

It is not just worker safety regulations that are rolling back. Just a few days ago the Republican led Legislature in Missouri pushed through a new law to lower the minimum wage in St Louis from $10 an hour to the state minimum of $7.70 an hour.  That’s right, the local city government raised the minimum wage and the state government passed a new law to make it illegal for cities within the state to raise the minimum wage in their area.  This new law is literally stealing $2.30 an hour from the hard working low-wage workers in St Louis.

Over the past few years, support for labor unions has continued to grow.  Working people are still suffering and struggling to pay their bills as wages have become stagnant.  Jobs are being shipped overseas and income inequality has grown to a point that rivals The Great Depression.  Working people are beginning  to realize the unions have been there fighting back all of this time and now labor unions’ approval rating exceeds 60%.  Support for unions has gained 13 points in the last ten years alone.

Personally, I am glad to see the labor movement doing more to get back to their roots, fighting for social and economic justice.  Labor unions are on the front lines of many of the major issues facing our country right now including:  Systemic racism, income inequality, climate change, access to the ballot box, LBGTQ rights, and women’s reproductive rights.

Every one of these issues affects the lives of working people and that is why labor unions are joining the fight. Should an employer be able to fire a worker for getting pregnant?  What are the health risks to all workers as the Trump administration rolls back environmental protections and allows companies to put more carbon into the air we breathe?  Should a worker be fired because they are gay or transgender?

These may not be what people think of as traditional union issues but are these any different from when labor helped push through an end to segregation?

So today,  as we celebrate Labor Day, let us remember all of the things that labor has done to help make America a better place for everyone.

If You’re Surprised By America’s Wage Stagnation, Then You’re Not Paying Attention

By Larry Willis, President of the Transportation Trades Department of the AFL-CIO

There’s been a lot of talk lately about the economy and how well it’s doing. The unemployment rate has steadily fallen for years now, and jobs are being created.

But wages? Not so much.

The latest jobs report shows that while the unemployment rate remains low, wages aren’t keeping up with inflation. Instead, they are falling flat.

Some economists and policymakers seem baffled — but TTD and our affiliated unions aren’t.

Yes, there are a number of reasons for this trend. But, as we reflect ahead of Labor Day, it is clear that anti-union policies, like so-called “right to work” laws, and failure to invest in our crumbling infrastructure are contributing factors that need to be called out and addressed.

Unions act as a check against corporate power, making union representation one of the most reliable ways for working people to improve their quality of life and secure a living wage. In fact, data shows a direct correlation between high union density and higher wages and better benefits. And while union members are more likely to have a pension, employer-paid health insurance, and earn an average of 13.2 percent more than their non-union counterparts, the union difference doesn’t just affect those covered by collective bargaining agreements. Strong union contracts influence competition, driving up wages, benefits, and standards of living for non-union workers too.

So what happens when working people don’t have access to unions? Take a look around – we’re seeing it right now. While millions of Americans struggle just to get by, the average CEO makes nearly $14 million annually – 200 times what an average employee earns. This is not a coincidence. It is the result of ruthless, decades-long attacks on the rights of working people to demand better for themselves and their families.

As for all those jobs being created, it is time we ask ourselves what kind of jobs they are. Based on an analysis from MIT’s living wage calculator, it takes a typical family of four (two adults, two children) more than $58,000 annually to have their basic needs met. A minimum-wage, non-union job just won’t cut it.

This country needs more good jobs — the kind that allow people to own a car, buy a house, and put their kids through college. Attacks on the rights of working people to negotiate together for better wages and benefits are not the only reasons these jobs are lacking. Failure by political leaders to invest in our nation’s transportation system hasn’t just left us with infrastructure that’s crumbling and dangerous — this inaction has also resulted in missed opportunities to create as many as 900,000 long-term, good paying jobs, annually.

Thanks to high union density in transportation and infrastructure industries, people working in these sectors — including frontline workers who build, operate, and maintain our transportation system — earn higher pay, better benefits, and more job security than their low-wage counterparts. In fact, at $38,480, the median annual wage paid by occupations in infrastructure is nearly $4,000 higher than the national median wage.

When Congress considers transportation and infrastructure spending, TTD and our affiliated unions will fight for policies that ensure these investments will continue to create the type of jobs we know our country needs. We cannot support an infrastructure plan that threatens long-standing labor standards or undermines the collective bargaining rights of working people.

There are ways to turn things around and make our economy work for everyone. But doing so requires taking a stand against the rich and powerful — something working people cannot do alone. America needs a commitment from political leaders on both sides of the aisle, not only to invest boldly in infrastructure, but to end attacks on the rights of working families, and understand that strong unions aren’t part of the problem — they are part of the solution.

AFL-CIO Makes A $500 Million Dollar Investment To Help Communities Hit By Hurricane Harvey

AFL-CIO Announces $5 Million in Cash Aid and $500 Million in Long-Term Investment to Help Communities Devastated by Hurricane Harvey

(Houston, TX) – AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler traveled to Houston to announce a significant investment by the labor movement to support Hurricane Harvey’s victims and to help rebuild areas destroyed by the historic storm. Specifically, she committed to raising $5 million in cash aid, and to marshalling labor’s investment and member benefits programs.

“This catastrophe has taken valuable lives. It has destroyed homes, leaving working people with nothing, but it will not take away our solidarity, or our strength and determination to stand together and get back on our feet,” said Shuler in Houston, addressing affected residents. “We are all in this together. Electricians, nurses, teachers and construction workers are on the front lines risking their lives to save lives. Working people here in Texas are at our best when we look after each other.”

While in Houston, Shuler also donated $100,000 from the national AFL-CIO to the Texas AFL-CIO’s Texas Workers Relief Fund.

Shuler added that the labor movement has a long-term commitment to help rebuild Houston and support working people affected by the storm.

“The AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust is putting together a program for investing $500 million over five years in affordable housing in the areas affected by Harvey,” she said. “We will be working together with the city of Houston, the Houston Housing Authority and community leaders to ensure these investments address both repair and new construction, in both owner-occupied housing and rental housing.”

A team from the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust will be traveling to the area next week to begin the planning work, Shuler said.

In addition, the AFL-CIO Building Investment Trust, a bank collective trust that provides risk-adjusted returns for union pension plans through investment in commercial real estate, and Ullico, a labor movement-affiliated financial service company, are working with the AFL-CIO on job-creating commercial real estate and infrastructure investment.

“Working people and our unions all across America are giving—our cash donations, our investment capital and our solidarity,” she concluded.

New Report Shows Non-Union Workers Are Less Likely To Have Paid Time Off

New AFL-CIO Labor Day Report Finds Americans’ Freedom to Spend Time with Family Eroding

Majority Think Unions Key to More Benefits on the Job

The majority of people agree that unions are the key to more benefits at work according to a new poll released today by the AFL-CIO, the Economic Policy Institute and GQRR.  The poll shows some startling results that fewer workers are getting paid time off for holidays and vacations, resulting in less time with their families. The poll also shows strong support for labor unions and that people want the ability to join a union.

Over the last twenty years research has shown that Americans are working more and more every year.  Productivity has gone up exponentially while wages have remained relatively flat.  For some, workers are working longer because they are forced to work two or three jobs, others because their employers expect them to work from home on their weekends.  63% of a people reported that they are taking fewer vacations and have less time off than they ever did in the past.
As workers face longer and longer workdays spending time with their families is becoming harder as many do not have access to paid time off for holidays or vacations.  The report shows that overall 23% of the workforce do not have paid holidays and 24% do not have paid vacations.  Access to paid time off even harder in low wage jobs.  “Among the bottom 10% of earners, 59% do not have access to paid holidays, while among the top 10% of earners, 7% do not have access to paid holidays.”

Share of private-sector workers without paid holidays, by wage group, 2017.

The report shows that if you want to have paid vacations, paid holidays, and overtime when you do work a holiday, it pays to be a union member.

The report showed: “While 78% of all working people polled have Labor Day off, 85% of union members do. Furthermore, 66% of union members receive overtime for working on Labor Day, compared with 38% of nonunion members. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of union members enjoy access to paid vacation, compared with 68% of nonunion members. Finally, 75% of union members have access to paid sick leave, compared with only 64% of nonunion members.”

The majority of American workers credit labor unions for many of the benefits they receive.
“Union workers empowered by the freedom to negotiate with employers do better on every single economic benchmark,” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. “Union workers earn substantially more money, union contracts help achieve equal pay and protection from discrimination, union workplaces are safer, and union workers have better access to health care and a pension.”

The report goes on to talk about how very few working people have access to paid family leave. This is paid time off to take your child to the doctor or stay home when they are ill. “Only a paltry 14% of private-sector workers have access to paid family leave through their employers.” the report stated.

This means that “37 million private-sector workers have no access to paid sick leave at all.”

Union Have Been Good for People by Raising Wages and Helping People Enter the Middle Class

Labor unions continue to push for more working people to have access to paid sick leave and family medical leave.  “Recently, in New Jersey, New York and Washington, D.C., respectively, the AFL-CIO has played lead roles in the fights to expand access to paid sick leave and paid family and medical leave for all working people. Elsewhere, individual unions have been at the forefront of new and ongoing fights in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, Oregon and Washington.”

These ongoing efforts have helped revitalize the labor movement.  The report found that “72% of Americans think unions help people enter the middle class.” They also understand the direct connection between unions and paid holidays and paid time off.

That is probably why 54% said that they would join a union today, IF they had the opportunity.

“This Labor Day, the AFL-CIO will continue to push for an economy that supports work-life balance and ensures every worker has the freedom to spend time with loved ones. Whether it’s strengthening the right to form a union and negotiate for paid time off, expanding paid leave nationwide or rewarding employers that do the right thing, we are committed to advancing commonsense solutions that allow more Americans to enjoy full and happy lives.”


Click here for the transcript of Richard Trumka talking to the Christian Science Monitor about the new report, “Laboring on Labor Day.”

The full “Laboring on Labor Day” report is included below.

17126_Report5-fin_1

Rep Kuster Explains How Trump’s Budget Cuts Hurt Students At Keene State

Kuster Discusses President’s Proposed Budget Cuts to Higher Education Affordability with Students, Higher Education Leaders at Keene State College 

(Keene, NH)- Today, Congresswoman Annie Kuster (NH-02) joined Granite State students and higher education leaders at Keene State College to discuss President Trump’s proposed budget cuts and their impact on higher education. Kuster heard directly from students and education stakeholders on how the President’s proposed budget reductions to critical higher education programs would impact access and affordability for students across New Hampshire.

“Access to quality, affordable higher education is one of the best ways to provide opportunity for our young people and maintain our state’s economic competitiveness,”said Congresswoman Kuster. “The budget proposed by President Trump would decimate critical financial aid programs and be a disaster for Granite Staters who want to pursue higher education. Our young people deserve the opportunity to access the educational opportunities that will help them achieve their goals, which is why I’m pushing legislation to increase financial support and address the costs of education. I will continue to advocate for policies that expand access to education and skills training programs and against President Trump’s harmful cuts.”

“Keene State College is pleased to host this important conversation about the need to keep the cost of college affordable,” said Dr. Melinda Treadwell, President of Keene State College. “As the state’s only public liberal arts college, we are guided by our mission to provide a high quality educational experience that is both accessible and affordable. We deeply appreciate Congresswoman Kuster’s leadership in this area and in other matters of importance to higher education here in New Hampshire and across the country.”

“I welcome the opportunity to join with our counterparts at Keene State to share key insights and information with Congresswoman Kuster,” said Dr. Kim Mooney, President of Franklin Pierce University. “I am encouraged by her interest in talking with us and with our students as budget cuts loom on the horizon that could have a deeply negative impact on our state and our country. New Hampshire has a long tradition of public and private colleges and universities collaborating around common higher-education issues and challenges in the best interests of our students and for the good of our state.”

Congresswoman Kuster has been a strong advocate in promoting college affordability during her time in Congress. She is currently supporting legislation to strengthen and expand Pell Grants through the Affordability for Constant and Continual Education to Enhance Student Success Act and the Year-Round Pell Grant Restoration Act. She has supported the Perkins Loan Program and funding for Pell Grants through her role as a member of the Higher Education Caucus.  This spring, Kuster helped reintroduce the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act to allow students to refinance their student loans at lower interest rates.

Kuster has also worked to expand access to community college and job training programs for Granite Staters. Earlier this year, she introduced her Workforce Development Investment Act, which would create tax incentives to encourage companies to partner with education providers to develop workforce training programs for skills that are in demand within their community or region. It would also create a separate credit for the cost of direct training conducted as part of an educational partnership or licensed apprenticeship.

Kuster was joined at today’s discussion by Dr. Melinda Treadwell, President of Keene State College; Dr. Kim Mooney, President of Franklin Pierce University; Steve Goetsch, Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management and Director of Student Financial Aid at Keene State College; Ken Ferreira, Associate Vice President of Student Financial Services at Franklin Pierce University; Debby Scire, Executive Director of Campus Compact for New Hampshire; Tori Berube, Vice President for College Planning and Engagement at New Hampshire Higher Education Assistance Foundation (NHHEAF); Jay Kahn, State Senator for New Hampshire District 10; Bailey St. Laurent, resident of Chicester and student at Keene State College; Luke Parkhurst, Littleton resident and student at Franklin Pierce University; and local students and higher education leaders, among others.

Nashua Teachers Union (AFT) Sends Support To Colleagues In The Wake Of Hurricane Harvey

NASHUA, NH August 31, 2017 – By now, we have all seen the destruction and devastating flooding left by Hurricane Harvey in Texas. As we start another school year here in Nashua, it’s hard not to think about the students, teachers, and school personnel who can’t go to school right now.

“It’s just heart-breaking,” said Adam Marcoux, President of the Nashua Teachers’ Union. “It’s hard to comprehend such destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey and the impact it has had on the communities. Here we are enjoying nice weather, the start of another school year, and they’re all just trying to survive, wondering where they might sleep or eat.”

The Nashua Teachers’ Union Board of Directors met on August 30 for their first meeting of the year. On the agenda was Texas AFT and how they could help their colleagues in Texas. To that end, the Board of Directors unanimously approved donating $2,415.00 to the Texas AFT Disaster Relief Fund. The $2,415.00 is an odd number for a donation, but it has special meaning.

“Members of the Nashua Teachers’ Union have met and become friends with members of the Houston Federation of Teachers, AFT Local 2415, through the AFT Teacher Leaders Program,” Marcoux said. He added, “The devastating event takes on a new meaning when you know people personally impacted by the destruction.” The $2,415.00 is in honor of the friends and colleagues of the Houston Federation of Teachers, AFT Local 2415. “AFT and locals around the country are bonded by our commitment to our profession and to our organization. We’re always going to be here to support each other,” Marcoux said.

The Nashua Teachers’ Union is also planning a school supplies drive for later in the year to help get the students, teachers, and classrooms ready for learning. Marcoux added, “They aren’t at a point yet where they can put these supplies to use so we’ll wait until November or December to collect those basic things like crayons and glue and then send them down.”

All the proceeds collected by Texas AFT will go to direct relief to affected Texas AFT members.

For more information, or to make a donation to Texas AFT, please visit http://www.texasaft.org/help-educators-impacted-hurricane-harvey/.

National Nurses United To The Rescue

RN Response Network Deploys Nurse Volunteers to Houston to Help Provide Medical Assistance Post-Hurricane Harvey

RNs to Provide Care as Well as Plan For Ongoing Nurse Deployments

National Nurses United (NNU)’s Registered Nurse Response Network (RNRN), a national network of volunteer nurses, will deploy its first delegation of RN volunteers to Houston, beginning Thursday, August 31, to work with locals on providing medical assistance in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, NNU announced today.

“As nurses, we felt immediately and strongly compelled to assist local communities in their process of healing and recovery from Hurricane Harvey,” said RN Response Network director Bonnie Castillo, RN. “This is just the beginning of our assistance, and RNRN will be working with local officials to send ongoing teams of volunteer nurses to areas impacted by the hurricane, in the months to come, given that the initial aftermath of a super storm like this is followed by continuing health challenges.

“RNRN has deployed volunteer nurses post-hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Typhoon Haiyan, as well as in other disaster relief and humanitarian assistance missions around the world, and we know from experience that long past the time when news cameras disappear, disaster-stricken communities still need care. Our nurses will be there to help.”

Registered nurse volunteers on the initial RNRN Hurricane Harvey relief deployment will be providing medical assistance at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, where around 9,000 people are seeking shelter from the storm. Over 1,000 registered nurses from 49 states and Puerto Rico have also answered RNRN’s call for Hurricane Harvey volunteers—and await possible future assignments.

“Being a nurse, you’ve sworn to care for people,” said RNRN volunteer Robert Enriquez, of El Paso Texas, a Cardio Vascular Intensive Care Unit RN, as well as an Emergency Medical Technician, paramedic and firefighter. “If people [impacted by the hurricane] need help, I feel like it’s my duty to help as much as I can.”

For Enriquez, the impact has even touched his own family, as a cousin in Houston “lost everything; everything is underwater.”

“One of the things I wanted to do with my license, when I got it about eight years ago, was to do volunteer work and to use my license to help people who really needed help,” said RN Erik Hoagland, an Intensive Care Unit nurse from Oakland, California, who will be deploying to Houston with RNRN. “I’m really proud to be part of National Nurses United.  It’s great that RNRN exists and that there’s an interest in taking care of the larger community.”

National Nurses United represents around 800 Texas registered nurses in communities hit by the storm. To that end, RNRN volunteers will also have the very personal experience of knowing that while they are deploying to provide assistance on the ground, they will be standing in solidarity with their local colleagues, who have been impacted both at work and at home.

“We nurses all just pulled together and got the job done,” said NNU member Valerie Gray, RN, a labor and delivery nurse from Houston who spent 97 hours at her hospital, in the aftermath of Harvey, working 12 hours then sleeping 12 hours. “I’m very proud of our team.”

“My mother lives in Port Aransas, and … everything is destroyed there. My mother’s house and my sister’s business are trashed,” said NNU member Kim Smith, RN, of Corpus Christie, who says local nurses are simply pulling together—despite struggles in their personal lives— to “do the most good for the most people you can; you’ve just got to go to work and keep going.”

Both local and RNRN volunteer nurses say they are concerned not just about immediate negative health impacts, as people face lack of food, shelter, water, power and basic sanitation, and lack of access to necessary medications—but also ongoing concerns ahead, with the potential for infectious diseases and injuries and illnesses in the cleanup effort.

“We understand that local people and first responders are still focused on the search and rescue process, and our nurses are going to be working in a way that will not add to the burden,” said Castillo. “We also understand that recovering will take time, and we want to assure local communities that our nurses will be here to help, today, tomorrow and in the months to come.”

“As the hurricane raged through Houston, my first thought was signing up to volunteer. I feel I have an ethical obligation to help any way I can in times of need,” said volunteer RN Amy Bowen, a flight nurse from Kansas City, Missouri, who will be adding the Houston deployment to her six previous deployments with RNRN.

“As a critical care registered nurse with prior disaster experience I understand the dire situation the people of Texas are facing, and I am compelled to offer any assistance that I can. With the support of National Nurses United, I know nurse volunteers make an impact.”


RNRN volunteer nurses have cared for thousands of patients during disaster relief and humanitarian assistance deployments that include the South Asian tsunami (2004); Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005); the Haiti earthquake (2010); Hurricane Sandy (2012); Super Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda (2013) and the Continuing Promise 2010 and 2015 humanitarian missions with the Department of Defense. RNRN volunteers have also provided first aid and basic response services to hundreds of community events across the country, as well as rotating teams who assisted the water protectors in Standing Rock in 2016. 

RNRN is powered by NNU, the largest organization of registered nurses in the U.S.

Executive Councilors To Hold Public Hearings On Proposed 10 Year Transportation Plan

This is your chance to tell the Executive Council loud and clear that New Hampshire must expand passenger rail service.

The condition of our roads and bridges has been a red hot topic over the past few years.  Overall New Hampshire has hundreds of “red” listed bridges which means they are in dire need of repairs. Tens of thousands of miles of roads that new to be repaved.

What roads should the state prioritize in their 1o year infrastructure plan?

What about new projects like expanding the Everett Turnpike or widening Route 3 through Concord?What new projects should the prioritize in their next 10 year plan?

And the million dollar question: Will the State finally get on board with expanding commuter rail service to New Hampshire?  If so, how far should the rail line go? Nashua? Manchester? Concord?

Past reports showed that expanded rail service would create over 5,000 new permanent jobs boosting our local economy.

Over the next two months Executive Councilors will be holding in-district meetings to hear directly from the people on what they State should prioritize in their 10 year transportation plan.  This is your chance to tell your elected representative that you support expanded rail.

They are asking to hear from you and now is your chance to tell them exactly how you feel.  Below is a printable PDF of all the scheduled public hearings and the Executive Councilor for that district.

Be sure to share this message and invite all your friends and family to attend.  It is time we make our voices loud and clear. We want RAIL!

( For more information on the benefits of expanding rail, click here)

GACIT Public Notice and Schedule

A Dartmouth Professor Gets Unfairly Chastised By College For Comments About ANTIFA

Since the events in Charlottesville there has been a growing discussion about “ANTIFA,” the nearly 100 year old organization thats sole purpose to stop the threat of fascism worldwide.

ANTIFA, short for Anti-Fascism, is made up of thousands of dedicated members who are willing to stand up and if necessary fight back against the militant rise of fascism.  As white supremacists in Charlottesville began attacking non-violent counter protestors, ANTIFA members defended them.  Dr. Cornel West said “that he felt that the antifa saved his life” as he stood with faith leaders singing “this little light of mine.”

Dr. Mark Bray, a lecturer at Dartmouth University has quickly emerged as the expert on ANTIFA and has recently spoken on a number of cable news outlets and Sunday talk shows.

Bray who authored the book, “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook” has come under fire for his comments on Meet the Press this week.  As the Union Leader reports, “Bray argued that ‘when pushed, self-defense is a legitimate response to white supremacist and neo-Nazi violence.’”

Dr Bray’s comments were then twisted by a right-wing news agency called “Campus Reform.”

“Following an article on the website Campus Reform that accused Bray of ‘endors[ing] Antifa violence,’ he has been subject of death threats and targeted online harassment,” wrote the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) that represents educators at Dartmouth. “We have recently seen a surge in politically motivated, targeted harassment against academics, especially those in ethnic and gender studies.”

Dartmouth President Phillip Hanlon quickly chastised Bray’s comments in a statement:

“Recent statements made by Lecturer in History Mark Bray supporting violent protest do not represent the views of Dartmouth. As an institution, we condemn anything but civil discourse in the exchange of opinions and ideas. Dartmouth embraces free speech and open inquiry in all matters, and all on our campus enjoy the freedom to speak, write, listen and debate in pursuit of better learning and understanding; however, the endorsement of violence in any form is contrary to Dartmouth values.”

Since Hanlon made his statement over 100 faculty members at Dartmouth have called for him to retract the statement.

“We continue to call on college and university leaders to denounce the targeted online harassment of their faculty members and to more forthrightly defend academic freedom, including the freedom of faculty members to speak as private citizens, even when their comments may provoke controversy or outrage,” said Henry Reichman, first vice president of the AAUP and chair of Committee A on academic freedom.

Reichman is right, Dr. Bray has done nothing wrong.  He spoke as a private citizen about a book that he wrote.  He never called for violence against white supremacists but stated that “self-defense is a legitimate response to white supremacist and neo-Nazi violence.”

I want to be clear, I do not condone violence but there is a significant difference between self defense and starting a fight.  Some people are ready, willing and able to stand up against these fascist white supremacists and defend those people who cannot.


Below is an interview from Democracy Now that recaps Dr West’s experience in Charlottesville before Dr Bray explains what Antifa is.

(Video should begin at 1:35 mark.)

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