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Fund the Government?
House GOP protects corporate interests, instead

budget_cutsThe House has passed a bill to keep the federal government from shutting down on March 27th.

According to Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers, the bill:

  1. provides $2 billion more than the President requested for non-war Defense funding – as well as an additional “$87.2 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) for Defense activities related to the Global War on Terror.”  It also includes $521 million more than the President requested for defense technologies research and development.
  2. includes “a provision allowing additional funding to ensure the safe and secure operation of Federal Prisons.”
  3. requires “Immigration and Customs Enforcement to sustain the mandated capacity of 34,000 detention beds.”
  4. extends the current pay freeze for federal employees.

Want to play connect-the-dots?

  1. Corporate profits of defense contractors are almost back to their pre-recession high.  Yet the defense industry “mobilized in a major way to stop the cuts to the Pentagon budget. The main thrust of the offensive has been a huge public relations campaign aimed at convincing Americans that the cuts would devastate defense contractors and the broader economy, causing the loss of about a million jobs.”  Connect the dots?   Chairman Rogers’ bill included defense funding levels that were higher than the President requested.  (For a sampling of how private contractors have wasted tax dollars, read the June 2009 Interim Report to Congress here.)
  2. The private prison industry didn’t actually feel the recession.  Contracting with the federal Bureau of Prisons is a growing business: up by almost 14% between 2010 and 2011.  Now check out the lobbyists: Corrections Corporation of America employed 33 different lobbyists last year.  (Geo Group had only four lobbyists; but one of them used to be Special Assistant for Legislative Affairs for President George W. Bush, so he probably knows a few people.)  Connect the dots?   Chairman Rogers’ bill provides “budget security” for federal prisons.
  3. And then there’s immigration.  Ever notice how – even though seven out of 10 Americans want there to be an easier path to citizenship – that idea hasn’t actually gotten very far in Congress? Ever wonder why Congress set a minimum number of ICE “detention beds”?  Just follow the money.  Private prisons spend $45 million on lobbying and rake in $5.1 billion for immigrant detention.  The industry invests in campaign contributions to key legislators.   Connect the dots?  Last month, sequestration cuts prompted ICE to release low-risk detainees from custody, dropping the number of detainees to less than 31,000.   Chairman Rogers’ bill requires ICE to resume paying for all 34,000 detention beds.  (And BTW, the cost of a detention bed is comparable to many hotel rooms.)
  4. And then there’s the pay freeze for federal workers.  (Are we ever going to have an economy that works for the 99%?)  Here’s the reality that most of us have known our entire working lives: productivity has skyrocketed, while our wages have remained relatively flat.  Growth of real hourly compensation for production/nonsupervisory workers and productivity, 1948–2011. Economic Policy Institute
    Ever since Richard Nixon was President, economic growth has been transformed into corporate profits rather than increased wages.  How does the 1% keep that trend going?  By pitting workers against each other.  By telling us to consider ourselves lucky to even have a job.  By breaking union contracts, cutting benefits and implementing pay freezes.  This move is straight out of the ALEC playbook.  Connect the dots?  Chairman Rogers’ bill extends the federal employee pay freeze and, by maintaining the sequester, mandates unpaid furlough days – guaranteeing that federal workers will be losing ground on wages, just like the rest of us.

Yep, the House GOP still thinks they were elected to protect corporate interests.  Nope, they still don’t care how their budget will affect America’s families.  Bottom line: this budget reflects the priorities of the House GOP.

Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

(Where can hungry five-year-olds find a good lobbyist?)

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About Liz Iacobucci

Liz Iacobucci is the former Public Information Officer for the State Employees’ Association of New Hampshire, SEIU Local 1984. Over the past three decades, she has served in government at the federal, state and municipal levels; and she has worked for both Democratic and Republican politicians.
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