Changing the Conversation – Earned Benefits are NOT Entitlements

(Photo by Robert Neff)

Social Security and Medicare are not “entitlements” – except in the sense that everyone should be entitled to the money (including interest) that they deposit in a bank account.

Our grandparents, parents and now you and I pay into these programs with every check we receive.  Pull out your paystub and look.  You will see deductions for FICA and for Medicare.  Why are these programs being included in conversations surrounding the “Fiscal Cliff”? 

For decades now, right-wing think tanks like the Heritage Foundation have been telling us we must “replace the culture of entitlements with one of mutual responsibility.”  But workers have always been responsible.  The only irresponsibility here belongs to Congress, who started borrowing from our fund  beginning in the Reagan years.

The Social Security Act of 1935 was a bipartisan accomplishment.  Politicians on both sides of aisle knew that disabled veterans returning from war, widows with dependent children and retirees to old to work, needed help.  This was not a government handout – it was a plan through which each employee would pay an income tax.  The money would be pooled together, and with interest, payments would be made to qualified recipients.

Why are some politicians trying to make us believe that Social Security is bankrupt?  The NH Sentinel Source.com reported in April 2011 that, “working Americans have paid so much in Social Security payroll taxes during the past three decades that they have built up a $2.6 trillion surplus in the account.”  Unfortunately, this account is now filled with “IOU’s” – and some politicians prefer to change the rules rather than looking at long-term solutions.

Senator Kelly Ayotte is one who believes that Social Security should be cut.  She voted for the Ryan Budet, which, according to the Kaiser Foundation, would harm 3.3 million people between the ages of 65-66.  This is not a reasonable answer or solution to the country’s fiscal situation.  Politicians should be protecting – not sacrificing – these programs that employees have paid into, all these decades.

It is up to all of us as American workers to ensure these programs will be there when we need them.  This begins with changing the conversation – and in particular, the wording.  Social Security and Medicare are not entitlements but Earned Benefits.  Our politicians must understand we will not give up on what is rightfully ours.

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About Terri Wright

Terri is the former Education & Training Coordinator for the State Employees' Association of NH. Prior to this, she worked for the National Education Association as a UniServ Director where she advocated for public education and worker's rights. She believes working together, "We Can Do It."
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